Tag Archives: Hauser & Wirth

FUTURE BODIES FROM A RECENT PAST

Contemporary sculpture is populated by hybrid techno-bodies. But such connections between technology and the body reach far back into modernity. The symposium explores these lines of reference: How can sculpture be thought of and defined in relation to technological developments? How, in turn, does sculpture relate to changing concepts of the body and corporeality? What are the consequences for a theory of contemporary sculpture? These and other questions form the focus of the discussion with leading theorists from various disciplines.*

Museum Brandhorst presents the online symposium FUTURE BODIES FROM A RECENT PAST—SCULPTURE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY SINCE THE 1950S. Participants include Marta Dziewanska, Louis Chude-Sokei, N. Katherine Hayles, Namiko Kunimoto, Jeannine Tang, Ursula Ströbele, and many others.

See link below to register.

FUTURE BODIES FROM A RECENT PAST—SCULPTURE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY SINCE THE 1950S*

Museum Brandhorst

Thursday, January 21 through Saturday, January 23.

From top: Mark Leckey, UniAddDumThs, 2014–ongoing, detail from the section Man, installation view Mark Leckey: UniAddDumThs at Kunsthalle Basel, 2015, photograph by Philipp Hänger, image © Mark Leckey, courtesy of the artist and Kunsthalle Basel; Alina Szapocznikow, Untitled (Fetish VII), 1971, Ursula Hauser Collection, Switzerland, image © 2020 VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, courtesy of the Estate of Alina Szapocznikow, Piotr Stanislawski, Galerie Loevenbruck, Paris, and Hauser & Wirth; BINA48 (Breakthrough Intelligence via Neural Architecture 48), robotic face combined with chatbot functionalities, owned by Martine Rothblatt’s Terasem Movement, modeled after Rothblatt’s wife, image © 2010 Hanson Robotics; Albert Renger-Patzsch, Marmor an der Lahn (Metamorphit), 1963, plate 55, Gestein, 1966, image © 2020 Albert Renger-Patzsch and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; David Smith, Forging series of sculptures in progress, Bolton Landing Dock, Lake George, New York, circa 1956, image © 2020 Estate of David Smith and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Tishan Hsu, Autopsy, 1988, installation view Tishan Hsu: Liquid Circuit at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, 2020, private collection, image © Tishan Hsu, courtesy of the artist and the Hammer Museum; Aleksandra Domanović, production photograph of The Future Was at Her Fingertips, 2013, image © Aleksandra Domanović, courtesy of the artist.

LUCHITA HURTADO —JUST DOWN THE STREET

If I have a voice at all, I’m going to use it… to complain [laughter]. Because it’s the only way that you get anything done. — Luchita Hurtado*

The exhibition LUCHITA HURTADO—JUST DOWN THE STREET is now open in Zürich. The show brings together the artist’s drawings and paintings on paper from the 1960s.

LUCHITA HURTADO—JUST DOWN THE STREET

Through July 31.

Hauser & Wirth

Limmatstrasse 270, Zürich.

*Hurtado and Hans Ulrich Obrist in conversation at LACMA, February 2020.

Luchita Hurtado, from top: Untitled, 1965, acrylic on paper; Just Down the Street, 1965, oil on paper; Portrait, 1965 / 1968, oil on paper; Luchita Hurtado—Just Down the Street, May 11, 2020–July 31, 2020, installation view; Untitled, circa 1957 / 1968, oil and conte on paper; Untitled, 1968, oil and graphite on paper. Artwork photographs by Jeff McLane. Images courtesy and © 2020 the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

RASHID JOHNSON — THE HIKERS IN PERFORMANCE

As part of THE HIKERSRashid Johnson’s new show and film at Hauser & Wirth New York—Martha Graham Dance Company members Leslie Andrea Williams and Lloyd Knight will perform a dance/movement iteration of the work.

THE HIKERS IN PERFORMANCE

Saturday, January 11, at 2 pm and 4 pm.

Hauser & Wirth

548 West 22nd Street, New York City.

Rashid Johnson, The Hikers, from top: Leslie Andrea Williams and Lloyd Knight in performance (2); Williams, choreographed by Claudia Schrier, photographs by Tony Prikryl, Aspen Art Museum, 2019. Rashid Johnson, Untitled Broken Men; The Hikers, film still. Images courtesy and © the artist, the Aspen Art Museum, and Hauser & Wirth.

ALINA SZAPOCZNIKOW — TO EXALT THE EPHEMERAL

My work has its roots in sculpture. For years I threw myself into studying problems of balance, volume, space, shadow, and light…

I took stock of the awareness of our time. I used my knowledge of the craft, my intuition, and my intelligence to note with increased clarity the poverty of my methods in comparison to modern techniques. I have been conquered by the hero-miracle of our age, the machine. To it belong beauty, revelations, testimonies, the recording of history. To it belong, in the end, truthful dreams and public demand…

Despite everything, I persist in trying to fix in resin the traces of our body: I am convinced that of all the manifestations of the ephemeral, the human body is the most vulnerable, the only source of all joy, all suffering, and all truth, because of its essential nudity, is as inevitable as it is inadmissible on any conscious level.Alina Szapocznikow, March 1972, Malakoff*

TO EXALT THE EPHEMERAL—ALINA SZAPOCZNIKOW, 1962–1972, a comprehensive exhibition of work by this essential artist, is on view in Manhattan for one more week.

TO EXALT THE EPHEMERAL—ALINA SZAPOCZNIKOW, 1962–1972

Through December 21.

Hauser & Wirth New York

32 East 69th Street, New York City.

February 7 through May 7, 2020.

Hauser & Wirth London

23 Savile Row, London.

*Alina Szapocznikow“Mon œuvre puise ses racines…,” March 1972, (courtesy Alina Szapocznikow Archive, Piotr Stanisławski, National Museum in Kraków), in To Exalt the Ephemeral: Alina Szapocznikow, 1962–1972, exhibition catalog (Zürich: Hauser & Wirth, 2019).

See Griselda Pollock, “Traumatic Encryption: The Sculptural Dissolutions of Alina Szapocznikow,” in After-affects / After-Images: Trauma and Aesthetic Transformation in the Virtual Feminist Museum (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013).

To Exalt the Ephemeral—Alina Szapocznikow, 1962–1972, Hauser & Wirth, New York, October 29–December 21, 2019, from top: Cendrier de célibataire I (The Bachelor’s Ashtray I), 1972, colored polyester resin and cigarette butts; Noga (Leg), 1962, plaster; Pamiątka I (Souvenir I), 1971, polyester resin, fiberglass, and photographs; Iluminowana (Illuminated Woman), 1966–1967, plaster, colored polyester resin, electrical wiring, and metal; Forma II, 1964–1965, unfired pink clay; Tumeur (Tumor), 1970, colored polyester resin and gauze; Szapocznikow in 1968, photograph by Roger Gain; Lampe-bouche (Illuminated Lips), 1966, colored polyester resin, electrical wiring, and metal; Sculpture-lampe, colored polyester resin, electrical wiring, and metal; Autoportrait, 1971, polyester resin and gauze; Man with an Instrument, 1965, cement, car part, and black patina; To Exalt the Ephemeral installation view, 2019; Szapocznikow with Envahissement de tumeurs (Invasion of Tumors) at her Malakoff studio, 1970; Sans titre (No Title), 1964–1965, original plaster; Ventre-coussin (Belly Cushion) , 1968, polyurethane foam, and Ventre, 1968, plaster, installation view, Alina Szapocznikow Malakoff studio, Paris, 1968. Artwork photographs by Fabrice Gousset, except To Exalt the Ephemeral installation view by Genevieve Hanson, Noga (Leg) by Thomas Barratt, and Forma II by Filip Vanzieleghem. All artwork by Alina Szapocznikow; images courtesy and © 2019, ProLitteris, Zürich, ADAGP, Paris, the Estate of Alina Szapocnikow, Piotr Stanislawski, Galerie Loevenbruck, Paris, and Hauser & Wirth.

CHARLES GAINES — MANIFESTOS 3 IN PERFORMANCE

The whole MANIFESTOS series is created this way: I put manifestos that I come across in a research file. And then I translate the text of each manifesto into musical notation. All the letters of the alphabet from A to G are converted directly into musical notation. So if the letter A pops up, then that’s translated into the note A. I also translate H as B flat, which is part of a Baroque tradition… All of the letters that are not notes becoming resting silent beats…

The whole idea, of course, is that the music is not produced subjectively. It’s produced following the system. The uncanny thing is that sound is subjectively realized. That happens because of the notational system; it’s a diatonic scale. The notational system is intuitive to anybody familiar with Western music… The listener finds the music meaningful regarding content and representation but fully understands there is no intention to produce meaning, or that the music is an expression of the artist… Whoever’s listening is making the meaning, because we’ve been trained to make those links. In other words, our cultural learning is producing our comprehension of the sound. That’s crucial to all my work. I’m arguing that the idea of the subjective imagination is an ideology, it’s not a fact.Charles Gaines*

In conjunction with the exhibition CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS, the artist’s MANIFESTOS 3—”a multimedia installation that functions as a systematic transliteration of two revolutionary manifestos into musical notation”—will be performed by pianist Richard Valitutto at Hauser and Wirth in Los Angeles.

An interpretation of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1967 speech at Newcastle University and James Baldwin’s 1957 essay “Princes and Powers”—a report from the famous 1956 Sorbonne conference of black writers—this MANIFESTOS 3 premiere will be followed by a conversation with Gaines and a book signing of the artist’s current exhibition catalog.

MANIFESTOS 3 BY CHARLES GAINES

Tuesday, December 10, at 7:30 pm.

CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS

Through January 5.

Hauser and Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

*“Manifestos: Charles Gaines in conversation with Cherise Smith, Part 2,” in Charles Gaines: Palm Trees and Other Works (Zürich: Hauser & Wirth, 2019), 118.

From top: Charles Gaines, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen; Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967 at Newcastle University; James Baldwin; Charles Gaines, Manifestos 3 (detail), 2018, photograph by Nilsen; Richard Valitutto; Numbers and Trees: Palm Canyon, Palm Trees Series 2, Tree #7, Mission (detail), 2019, acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, photograph, two parts, photograph by Nilsen. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, and Hauser & Wirth.