Tag Archives: Helen Frankenthaler

FRANKENTHALER IN VENICE

PITTURA/PANORAMA—PAINTINGS BY HELEN FRANKENTHALER, 1952–1992—an exhibition at Palazzo Grimani—is the first presentation of her work in Venice since the 33rd Biennale in 1966.

Curated by John Elderfield, the show features fourteen works and “focuses on the artist’s development of the pittura (painting) and the panorama: the interplay between works like easel paintings, although made on the floor, and large, horizontal paintings that open onto shallow but expansive spaces, in the way that panoramas do.”*

“There are no rules. I’d rather risk an ugly surprise than rely on things I know I can do. Art has a will of its own. You have to know how to use the accident, how to recognize it, how to control it, and ways to eliminate it so that the whole surface looks felt and born all at once.” — Helen Frankenthaler

PITTURA/PANORAMA—PAINTINGS BY HELEN FRANKENTHALER, 1952–1992*

Through November 17.

Palazzo Grimani

Ramo Grimani 4858, Venice.

From top: Helen FrankenthalerRiverhead, 1963, acrylic on canvas; Frankenthaler (center) in Venice in 1966 for the 33rd Biennale; Helen FrankenthalerMaelstrom, 1992, acrylic on canvas; Helen FrankenthalerFor E.M., 1981, acrylic on canvas (“E.M.” is Édouard Manet); Frankenthaler pouring paint—her “soak-stain” technique—onto a large unprimed canvas, photographs by Ernest Haas (2): images from the exhibition catalog Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992, published by Gagosian, 2019 (3); Helen FrankenthalerOpen Wall, 1953, oil on unsized, unprimed canvas; Frankenthaler in her studio at Third Avenue and East 94th Street, New York City, with  Mediterranean Thoughts (1960, in progress, left) and Figure with Thoughts (1960, in progress, center), March 1960, photograph by Tony Vaccaro. Images of Frankenthaler works were photographed by Rob McKeever and are courtesy and © the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc., Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Gagosian, 2019.

LEE KRASNER

The first major European retrospective of the artist’s work in half a century, LEE KRASNER—LIVING COLOUR brings together nearly 100 paintings, drawings, collages, and photographs by this pioneer of Abstract Expressionism.

A section of the exhibition at the Barbican reproduces Krasner’s small upstairs studio at the house in the Springs (East Hampton) she shared with Jackson Pollock during the decade of their marriage—from 1945 until Pollock’s death in a car crash in 1956—after which she took over Pollock’s studio and began her work on large, unstretched canvases.

After London, the show will travel to Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt.

LEE KRASNER—LIVING COLOUR

Through September 1.

Barbican Art Gallery

Silk Street, London.

See Mary Gabriel, Ninth Street Women—Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art (New York: Little, Brown, 2018).

From top: Lee Krasner, Polar Stampede, 1960, the Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy Kasmin Gallery, New York, photograph by Christopher Stach; Lee Krasner, Desert Moon, 1955, LACMA, © 2018, Digital Image Museum Associates, LACMA, Art Resource, New York, Scala, Florence; Krasner, circa 1938, photographer unknown; Lee Krasner, Palingenesis, 1971, courtesy Kasmin Gallery; Lee Krasner, Abstract No. 2, 1946–1948, Institut Valencià d’Art Modern, photograph provided by IVAM; Lee Krasner, Icarus, 1964, Thomson Family Collection, New York City, courtesy Kasmin Gallery, photograph by Diego Flores; Lee Krasner, Bald Eagle, 1955, collection of Audrey Irmas, Los Angeles, photograph by Jonathan Urban. Images courtesy and © the Pollock-Krasner Foundation.