Tag Archives: Howardena Pindell

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF—a group show of women artists at Morán Morán, curated by Eve Fowler—is on view for one more week.

This highly recommended exhibition includes the work of Etel Adnan, Frances Barth, Donna Dennis, Florence Derive, Simone Fattal, Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Barbara Hammer, Harmony Hammond, Maren Hassinger, Suzanne Jackson, Virginia Jaramillo, Harriet Korman, Joyce Kozloff, Magali Lara, Mary Lum, Mónica Mayer, Dona Nelson, Senga Nengudi, Howardena Pindell, and Joan Semmel.

“The title of the show is from a Gertrude Stein text that Fowler selected for its ambiguous poetry that she felt honored the artists.”

I’m not asking the artists to tell me anything, but they allowed me in their studios—a private place where artists often feel vulnerable. — Eve Fowler*

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF*

Through August 24.

Morán Morán

937 North La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Please Recall to Me Everything You Have Thought Of, curated by Eve Fowler, Morán Morán, 2019, from top: Howardena Pindell, Untitled #51, 2010, mixed media on board, courtesy Garth Greenan Gallery; Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Untitled, 1972, glazed stoneware; Senga Nengudi, Rapunzel, 1981, silver gelatin print; Suzanne Jackson, finding joy in the mirror, 2016, acrylic, wood veneer, Bogus paper, loquat seeds, courtesy of O-Town House; Donna Dennis installation view; Florence Derive, Blue Manuscript, 2017, oil on raw linen; Maren Hassinger, Whole Cloth, 2017, photograph on fabric; Barbara Hammer, South Fork Yuba River, California, 1973, 2017, silver gelatin print, courtesy of Company Gallery; Barbara Hammer, Dyketactics, 1974, 16mm film transferred to video with sound; Harmony Hammond, Aperture #6, 2013, monotype on paper, courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates; Simone Fattal, Woman as Tree (1), 2010, porcelain, courtesy of Kaufmann Repetto; Frances Barth, A Tiny Pinch, 2017, acrylic on gessoed wood panel; Joan Semmel, Untitled, 2016, oil crayon on paper, courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates; Dona Nelson, Luka, 2015, acrylic and mixed media on canvas, courtesy of Michael Benevento; Etel Adnan, Mount Tamalpais, 2013, ink on handmade paper (2), courtesy of Callicoon Fine Arts; Mary Lum, Informations Practiques, 2019, acrylic on paper; Virginia Jaramillo, Visual Theorems 15, 1979, linen fiber with hand-ground earth pigments, courtesy of Hales Gallery; Harriet Korman, Untitled, 2016–18, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artists and Morán Morán.

HOWARDENA PINDELL

Howardena Pindell’s retrospective exhibition WHAT REMAINS TO BE SEEN is now on view at Brandeis in Massachusetts.

HOWARDENA PINDELL—WHAT REMAINS TO BE SEEN

Through May 19.

Rose Art Museum

Brandeis University

415 South Street, Waltham.

From top: Howardena Pindell, Untitled #20 (Dutch Wives Circled and Squared), 1978 (detail), mixed media on canvas; Howardena Pindell, Night Flight, 2015–2016, mixed media on canvas; Howardena Pindell, Video Drawings: Swimming, 1975, chromogenic print; Howardena Pindell, Untitled #5B (Krakatoa), 2007, mixed media on paper collage. Images courtesy the artist, Garth Greenan Gallery, New York, and MCA Chicago.

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION—BLACK RADICAL WOMEN, 1965–1985 “examines the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism.”

The exhibition includes work by Emma Amos, Camille Billops, Kay Brown, Vivian E. Browne, Linda Goode Bryant, Beverly Buchanan, Carole Byard, Elizabeth Catlett, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Ayoka Chenzira, Christine Choy and Susan Robeson, Blondell Cummings, Julie Dash, Pat Davis, Jeff Donaldson, Maren Hassinger, Janet Henry, Virginia Jaramillo, Jae Jarrell, Wadsworth Jarrell, Lisa Jones, Loïs Mailou Jones, Barbara Jones-Hogu, Carolyn Lawrence, Samella Lewis, Dindga McCannon, Barbara McCullough, Ana Mendieta, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Alva Rogers, Alison Saar, Betye Saar, Coreen Simpson, Lorna Simpson, Ming Smith, and Carrie Mae Weems.

 

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION—BLACK RADICAL WOMEN, 1965–1985, through January 14.

CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM, 600 State Drive, Exposition Park, Los Angeles.

https://caamuseum.org/exhibitions/2017/we-wanted-a-revolution

Closing symposium, Saturday, January 14, from 1 pm to 7 pm.

caamuseum.org/we-wanted-a-revolution-closing-symposium

Faith Ringgold, The People’s Flag Show.

ringgold_peoplesflagshow_810x455

POWER AT SPRÜTH MAGERS

“The cultural contributions of women and women of color are still underrepresented in the art world, and we are still asked to contextualize our practice in ways that other privileged artists simply are not.” — Shinique Smith*

“I have recently been exploring the idea of doing my work in secret. I was inspired by discovering the work of The United Order of Tents. They are a secret society of black nurses. They have supported each other and done good works since the Civil War. The Mother Emmanuel Church met in secret for 35 years, while black churches were banned in South Carolina after the Nat Turner rebellion.

“I don’t really have time to explain my work to people who feel that I have an identity and they don’t. I don’t have time to unpack all that. I’m focused on using black feminist theory or any other tools that can help me sharpen my knife, and make better work.” — Simone Leigh*

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, a survey of over 60 works by 37 artists—including Ellen Gallagher, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Betye Saar, Ntozake ShangeMickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, and Carrie Mae Weems—is now on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles.

The exhibition, curated by Todd Levin, also includes a selection of images from the Ralph DeLuca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography.

 

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, through June 10.

SPRÜTH MAGERS, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

*Artists’ quotes from Power, the booklet published on the occasion of the exhibition:

spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/445

ALSO SEE: theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/apr/05/kara-walker-karon-davis-power-black-female-artists

The participating artists: Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Sonya Clark, Renee Cox, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Karon Davis, Minnie Evans, Nona Faustine, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ellen Gallagher, Leslie Hewitt, Clementine Hunter, Steffani Jemison, Jennie C. Jones, Simone Leigh, Julie Mehretu, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Sondra Perry, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Joyce J. Scott, Emmer Sewell, Ntozake Shange, Xaviera Simmons, Lorna Simpson, Shinique Smith, Renee Stout, Mickalene Thomas, Alma Woodsey Thomas, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Kara Walker, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Carrie Mae Weems, and Brenna Youngblood.

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014 Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood 243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm 96 x 20 x 20 inches Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014
Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood
243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
96 x 20 x 20 inches
Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers

HOWARDENA PINDELL AT HONOR FRASER GALLERY

 

Howardena Pindell, Video Drawings: Track, 2007. Cibachrome, 8 x 10 inches.

 

 

Howardena Pindell
Honor Fraser, Culver City, CA
September 11 – October 31, 2015

 

Howardena Pindell, 2015, Installation view

Howardena Pindell, 2015, Installation view

Howardena Pindell, War: Cambodia (Over 5 Million Killed), 1988. Chromogenic print, 8 x 10 inches.

Howardena Pindell, Untitled #22, 2003, Mixed media on board, 7 x 8 inches

Howardena Pindell, Untitled #22, 2003. Mixed media on board, 7 x 8 x 1/2 inches.

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