Tag Archives: Huma Bhabha

ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE

“While geological epochs are known as products of slow change, the Anthropocene has been characterized by speed. Runaway climate change, rising water, surging population, non-stop extinction, and expanding technologies compress our breathless sense of space and time.”*

Organized around seven themes—Deluge, Raw Material, Consumption, Extinction, Symbiosis and Multispecies, Justice, and Imaginary Futures—the traveling exhibition THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE explores the ongoing crisis through the work of over forty artists.

THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE*

Through March 3.

Harn Museum of Art

University of Florida

3259 Hull Road, Gainesville.

From April 27 through July 28:

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery

University of Michigan Museum of Art

525 South State Street, Ann Arbor.

See: Antek Walczak, “Welcome to the Anthropocene: Tornadoes of Cash and Hurricanes of Capital,” in Oscar Tuazon Live (Los Angeles: DoPe Press/Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2014), 55–62.

THE WORLD TO COME includes work by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, Claudia Andujar, Sammy Baloji, Subhankar Banerjee, Huma Bhabha, Liu Bolin, Edward Burtynsky, Sandra Cinto, Elena Damiani, Dornith Doherty, Charles Gaines, Mishka Henner, Felipe Jácome, Chris Jordan, William Kentridge, Wifredo Lam, Maroesjka Lavigne, Eva Leitolf, Dana Levy, Yao Lu, Pedro Neves Marques, Noelle Mason, Mary Mattingly, Gideon Mendel, Ana Mendieta, Kimiyo Mishima, Richard Misrach, Beth Moon, Richard Mosse, Jackie Nickerson, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, Abel Rodríguez, Allan Sekula, Taryn Simon, Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Laurencia Strauss, Thomas Struth, Bethany Taylor, Frank Thiel, Sergio Vega, Andrew Yang, and Haegue Yang.

From top: Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Spatial Intervention 1, video still, 2002. Courtesy the artists. © Bildrecht, Vienna, 2017; Taryn SimonWhite Tiger (Kenny), Selective Inbreeding, Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge and Foundation, Eureka Springs, Arkansas (detail), 2006–07, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007, © Taryn SimonLiu Bolin, Hiding in the City, No. 95, Coal Pile, 2010, image courtesy the artist, © Liu BolinRichard Mosse, Stalemate, 2011, courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Maroesjka LavigneWhite Rhino, Namibia, from the series Land of Nothingness (2015), courtesy of the artist.

SYMPOSIUM ON MIKE KELLEY’S KANDORS

Huma Bhabha, Thomas E. Crow, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Sylvia Lavin, David Mather, Dan Nadel, John C. Welchman, and Mary Clare Stevens will be at Redcat this weekend for a day-long seminar on Mike Kelley’s KANDORS.

 

SYMPOSIUM ON MIKE KELLEY’S KANDORS, Saturday, November 18, from 10:30 am through 4 pm.

REDCAT, Disney Hall, Music Center, downtown Los Angeles.

redcat.org/event/symposium-mike-kelleys-kandors

MIKE KELLEY—KANDORS, through January 21, 2018.

HAUSER & WIRTH LOS ANGELES, 901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

hauserwirthlosangeles.com

All work by Mike Kelley. From top: 

City 17, 2011; Kandor 10B (Exploded Fortress of Solitude), 2011; Lenticular 7, 2007. Exhibition view.

Image credit: Hauser & Wirth. City 17 photograph by Fredrik Nilsen.

 City 17, 2011 Tinted urethane resin on illuminated base 213.4 x 41.9 (diam.) cm / 84 x 16 1/2 (diam.) in Photo: Fredrik Nilsen © Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts. All Rights Reserved/Licensed by VAGA, New York NY

20130613_city-17-4-5-_kelle70596-uLiGzn

20110617_gg_mk-cave_147b_KELLE70114

Lenticular 7, 2007 Lenticular panel, lightbox 180.3 x 126.4 x 8.9 cm / 71 x 49 3/4 x 3 1/2 in 2011-03-25-kandor

AT MARCIANO, UNPACKING REPACKING

UNPACKING—the inaugural show at the Marciano Art Foundation—will be up through mid-September, when it makes way for the installation of a Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA exhibition, opening in October, 2017.

Included in UNPACKING—curated by Philipp Kaiser—are works by El Anatsui, Walead Beshty, Huma Bhabha, Carol Bove, Latifa Echakhch, Cyprien Gaillard, Rashid Johnson, Glenn Ligon, Paul Sietsema, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Oscar Tuazon, and Kaari Upson.

The foundation’s building—a repurposed Masonic temple—also features one of the best small bookstores in town. The shop stocks a comprehensive selection of catalogues and art books by artists in Maurice and Paul Marciano’s collection, as well as a shelf-full of back issues of the recently discontinued journal Parkett.

UNPACKING—THE MARCIANO COLLECTION

Through September 16.

Marciano Art Foundation

Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Oscar Tuazon, Playboy Papercrete, 2012/2013 (detail) and Latifa Echakhch, All Over 2016, images courtesy the artists and Galerie Eva PresenhuberAdrián Villar RojasTwo Suns (II), 2015, image courtesy the artist and the Marciano Art Foundation.