Tag Archives: James Baldwin

CHARLES GAINES — MANIFESTOS 3 IN PERFORMANCE

In conjunction with the exhibition CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS, the artist’s MANIFESTOS 3—”a multimedia installation that functions as a systematic transliteration of two revolutionary manifestos into musical notation”—will be performed by pianist Richard Valitutto at Hauser and Wirth in Los Angeles.*

An interpretation of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1967 speech at Newcastle University and James Baldwin’s 1957 essay “Princes and Powers”—a report from the famous 1956 Sorbonne conference of black writers—this MANIFESTOS 3 premiere will be followed by a conversation with Gaines and a book signing of the artist’s current exhibition catalog.

MANIFESTOS 3 BY CHARLES GAINES*

Tuesday, December 10, at 7:30 pm.

CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS

Through January 5.

Hauser and Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Charles Gaines, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen; Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967 at Newcastle University; James Baldwin; Charles Gaines, Manifestos 3 (detail), 2018, photograph by Nilsen; Richard Valitutto; Numbers and Trees: Palm Canyon, Palm Trees Series 2, Tree #7, Mission (detail), 2019, acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, photograph, two parts, photograph by Nilsen. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, and Hauser & Wirth.


TONY LEWIS AND HAMZA WALKER

In conjunction with CHARLATAN AND ULTIMATELY A BORING MAN—the Tony Lewis exhibition at Blum & Poe that takes as its point of focus the 1965 Cambridge University debate between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr.—Lewis will join Hamza Walker for a talk at the gallery.

TONY LEWIS AND HAMZA WALKER in conversation

Saturday, June 29, from 2 pm to 4 pm.

Blum & Poe

2727 South La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Tony Lewis, from top: …The Gravamen Of Mr. Baldwin’s Charges Against America…, 2019, graphite and Epson UltraChrome ink on paper; Man, 2018, pencil, graphite powder, and correction tape on paper and transparency; Tony Lewis—Charlatan and Ultimately a Boring Man, 2019, Blum & Poe, installation views (2); Boring, 2019, graphite, pencil, and colored pencil on paper mounted on wood (2, first 76 x 99 inches, second 76 x 100 inches); Tony Lewis—Charlatan and Ultimately a Boring Man, 2019, Blum & Poe, installation views (2). Images courtesy and © the artist and Blum & Poe.

MOVED BY THE MOTION — SUDDEN RISE

SUDDEN RISE—co-written by Wu Tsang, boychild, and Fred Moten—is the New York City performance debut of the ensemble Moved by the Motion.

This “collage” of text, film, movement, and sound is complemented by the words of Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Hannah Arendt, W.E.B. Du Bois and Jimi Hendrix.

MOVED BY THE MOTION—SUDDEN RISE

Friday, April 26, at 8 pm.

Saturday April 27, at 4 pm and 8 pm.

Whitney Museum of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

Moved by the MotionSudden Rise, photographs by Paula Court/EMPAC. Images courtesy of Moved by the Motion and the photographer.

HILTON ALS — A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN

“Troubled times get the tyrants and prophets they deserve. During our current epoch, the revival of interest in author James Baldwin has been particularly intense. This is in part due, of course, to his ability to analyze and articulate how power abuses through cunning and force and why, in the end, it’s up to the people to topple kingdoms.

“As a galvanizing humanitarian force, Baldwin is now being claimed as a kind of oracle. But by claiming him as such, much gets erased about the great artist in the process, specifically his sexuality and aestheticism, both of which informed his politics.” — Hilton Als*

GOD MADE MY FACE—A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN—a group show curated by Hilton Als, featuring the work of Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Alvin Baltrop, Beauford Delaney, Marlene Dumas, Ja’Tovia Gary, Glenn Ligon, Alice Neel, Cameron Rowland, Kara WalkerJane Evelyn Atwood, and James Welling—is on view through mid-February.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Metrograph and Als will present a series of films featuring Baldwin through the years, at home and abroad.

GOD MADE MY FACE—

A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN*

Through February 16.

David Zwirner

525 and 533 West 19th Street, New York City.

HILTON ALS ON JAMES BALDWIN FILM SERIES

Friday and Saturday, February 1 and 2.

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street, New York City.

See “The Energy of Joy: Hilton Als in conversation with David Bridel and Mary-Alice Daniel,” PARIS LA 16 (2019): 217–221.

From top: Marlene Dumas, James Baldwin, 2014, from the Great Men series exhibited at Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, image credit: Marlene Dumas and Bernard Ruijgrok PiezographicsBeauford Delaney, Dark Rapture, 1941, oil on canvas; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (man sitting), 1975-1986, photograph; Richard AvedonJames Baldwin, writer, Harlem, New York, 1945, © The Richard Avedon Foundation; Ja’Tovia Gary, An Ecstatic Experience, 2015, video still; Jane Evelyn AtwoodJames Baldwin with bust of himself sculpted by Larry Wolhandler, Paris, France, 1975 (detail), gelatin silver print. All images courtesy David Zwirner.

JULIANA SPAHR AND CLAUDIA RANKINE

DU BOIS’S TELEGRAM is a brilliant inquiry into the institutions—from the CIA to the foundations and literary magazines it funded—that inform and shape literary production. The promoted, the funded and heralded—from Richard Wright to Gertrude Stein to James Baldwin—do the work of the nation state under the umbrella of culture. Our complicit freedoms are brought out in the open in this thought-provoking and erudite book. This is not a book to agree or disagree with, but rather a compelling argument that brings relevant facts forward for clear-eyed consideration. One would be remiss to pass on such essential research and analysis.” — Claudia Rankine

Juliana Spahr—author of DU BOIS’S TELEGRAM —will be joined by Rankine for a discussion about the book, which takes as its impetus the telegram W.E.B. Du Bois sent when he was denied a passport to attend the 1956 Présence Africaine Congress of Black Writers and Artists in Paris:

“Any Negro-American who travels abroad today must either not discuss race conditions in the United States or say the sort of thing which our State Department wishes the world to believe.” — W.E.B. Du Bois

 

CLAUDINE RANKINE AND JULIANA SPAHR

Thursday, December 13, at 7:30 pm.

92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Avenue, New York City.

 

DUBOIS’S TELEGRAM—LITERARY RESISTANCE AND STATE CONTAINMENT, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018).

Above: Claudia Rankine.

Below: Juliana Spahr.