Tag Archives: Jasmine Orpilla

LIGIA LEWIS — DEADER THAN DEAD

Maybe within the museum dance can have another rhythm, temporality, be made more elusive. Dance could then escape the heavily prescribed regime often found in theaters, with concise beginnings and ends and a required length. Here then it could even be made “ghostly.”

Even then, I can attest to my general feelings of unease with the weightlessness of History and the collecting of objects within the museological frame. This unease also bears on questions of site/sight as it pertains to the museum as space for viewing dance and performance. I have become increasingly more comfortable and, let’s say, provoked by the role of seeing and being seen by an audience. This relation to an audience is crucial and in large part where the resistance lies in my work. — Ligia Lewis*

As the Hammer Museum, the Huntington, and an art-starved public wait for the chance to experience Made in L.A. 2020: a version in person, artist and choreographer Ligia Lewis has created a video documenting deader than dead, her work for the biennial.

Performed by Jasper Marsalis, Jasmine Orpilla, Austyn Rich, and Lewis, deader than dead “began with an intrigue-based inquiry into deadpan, an impassive mannerism deployed in comedic fashion in order to illustrate emotional distance. Utilizing this expression as a type of stasis, Lewis initially developed a choreography for ten dancers that remained expressively flat or dead, resisting any narrative or representational hold tied to a climactic build or progression. Lewis had relegated deader than dead to this corner of the gallery (a kind of ‘dead’ space) where the dance would ostensibly emerge, although deadened in its repetition, limited in its fate, as it ricocheted from wall to wall.

“[Lewis] abandoned this recursive ensemble of death due to COVID-19, reducing the cast to four performers and pivoting to a more traditionally theatrical presentation. In this new work the dancers use Macbeth’s culminating soliloquy (‘Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,’ a reflection on repetition and meaninglessness) as the beginning of a work that unfolds in modular parts, each one an illustration or parody of death, stasis, and the void, each one tied to its own carefully selected soundtrack or sample.”*

See link below to watch the video.

LIGIA LEWIS—DEADER THAN DEAD*

Made in L.A.: a version

Hammer Museum and the Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Gardens

Through March 2021.

*“Ligia Lewis and Ikechukwu Onyewuenyi in Conversation,” in Made in L.A. 2020: a version (Los Angeles: Hammer Museum; Munich: DelMonico-Prestel, 2020).

Ligia Lewis, deader than dead (2020), Made in L.A. 2020: a version. Video images © Ligia Lewis, courtesy of the artist, the performers, the Hammer Museum, and the Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Gardens.

ADAM LINDER AT REDCAT

Playwright Bernard-Marie Koltès (1948–1989)—a key figure in French postwar drama—believed that dramatic action is always transactional because, writes stage director and Koltès scholar Fabrice Conte, “characters can only interact within the context of a form of negotiation.”

The relationship between the Client and Dealer in Koltès’ play Dans la solitude des champs de coton was the impetus for Adam Linder‘s contemporary opera THE WANT—at Redcat this week in its premiere Los Angeles engagement.

THE WANT will be performed by Jess Gadani, Justin F. Kennedy, Jasmine Orpilla, and Roger Sala Reyner.

Ethan Braun wrote the music and the lighting design is by Shahryar Nashat. The Los Angeles production is co-presented by CAP UCLA.

Working on projects in which our roles interweave, we don’t start with Shahryar as the maker of sculptures or of moving images. Because he’s worked in those mediums, his way of thinking has a particular texture. And because I’ve worked in performing arts and with liveness and theater, my way of thinking has a specific texture.

What interests us is how these textures either complement or productively resist each other. It’s not about the formal outcome of these mediums being combined. And that’s where I would ontologically separate our way of working together from the notion of the “interdisciplinary.” We don’t care about disciplines meeting, but about our sensibilities crisscrossing.Adam Linder

The reason why Adam and I say we never collaborate and are not interested in doing so is that we don’t really make work together. When he comes to me asking if I would do the stage design for a piece he’s making, I’m happy to work within his concept and apply my skills to his vision. For an artist, it can be playful to have these limitations—in an applied arts versus visual arts kind of way. Adam becomes a bit like my client. — Shahryar Nashat

ADAM LINDER—THE WANT

Thursday through Saturday, September 19, 20, and 21, at 8:30 pm.

Sunday, September 22, at 7 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Linder and Nashat quotes are from their 2018 Bomb interview by Aram Moshayedi.

Adam Linder, The Want, 2019. Images courtesy and © the artists, performers, and videographer.

ADAM LINDER — THE WANT

Inspired by the Bernard-Marie Koltès play In the Solitude of Cotton Fields (1986), choreographer Adam Linder has created a new opera, THE WANT, with music by Ethan Braun and a libretto in co-operation with Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer.

The work premieres this week in Berlin, and will open in Hamburg in January. The cast of singers, actors, and dancers includes Jess Gadani, Justin F. Kennedy, Jasmine Orpilla, and Roger Sala Reyner.

THE WANT—Premiere

Thursday through Saturday, December 13, 14, and 15, at 8:30 pm.

Sunday, December 16, at 7 pm.

Hebbel am Ufer, HAU 2, Hallesches Ufer 32, Berlin.

 

THE WANT

Thursday through Saturday, January 10, 11, and 12, at 8 pm.

Kampnagel, K1, Jarrestrasse 20, Hamburg.

Adam Linder, The Want (2018). Photographs by Andrea Rossetti.

Images courtesy the artists and Hebbel am Ufer.

MIWA MATREYEK AND MORGAN SORNE

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The animator and performer Miwa Matreyek will collaborate with five-octave vocalist Morgan Sorne this week as part of Week One of Redcat’s NOW FESTIVAL 2018.

EAT YOUR YOUNG is a “visual kaleidoscope of complex shape-shifting imagery of the anthropocene,” and will be performed nightly.*

Also on the bill: SOLID, LIKE A ROCK—a dance piece from choreographer Jmy James Kidd and composer-instrumentalist Tara Jane O’Neil—and HOW MANY YEARS DID WE FIGHT THE BEAST TOGETHER, a collaboration between singer-composer Jasmine Orpilla and Peter Deguzman, the artistic director of Malaya Filipino-American Dance Arts.

 

MIWA MATREYEK and MORGAN SORNE—EAT YOUR YOUNG

Thursday through Saturday, July 19, 20, and 21, at 8:30 pm.

REDCAT, Disney Hall, 631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

redcat.org/now2018week1

Miwa Matreyek (above) and Morgan Sorne.

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