Tag Archives: Jeff Koons

PARKETT — PHOTO

Parkett presents PHOTO, “the first survey exhibition of all photographic works made by artists for the journal over the last three decades. On view at Parkett’s Zurich space, the show includes some ninety works spanning a rarely seen, vast, and diverse range of photographic positions and ideas.”*

“The exhibition follows the evolution of photographic methods in the past three decades, with many of the earlier photographs making use of analog techniques, while digital editing informs the more recent works. Common threads including people and portraiture, landscapes both urban and natural, everyday objects, and abstraction, connect an otherwise expansive range of visual topics.”*

“Many of the works on view combine photographic elements with other media, such as gouache, collage, textiles, installation, or printmaking. Also on view are works, which while similar in terms of media and format, are unique and contain distinct differences within each project. Further exhibition displays include five video works, as well as a selection of artists’ inserts—the specially commissioned 10–12 book page projects published in each issue of Parkett.”*

“You can grab an issue from thirty years ago and see the context. You can grab that context and time. The internet has no historical orientation. You click on an article and you don’t know what context [it was published in]. I think this loss of memory is deplorable.” — Jacqueline Burckhardt, Parkett co-founding editor**

PHOTO

THE FIRST SURVEY OF ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS MADE BY ARTISTS FOR PARKETT SINCE 1984*

Through September 28.

Parkett Space Zürich

Limmatstrasse 268, Zürich.

**See “Time, Context, Object—The Parkett Story,” PARIS LA 16 (2018).

PHOTO artists include: Tomma Abts, Franz Ackermann, Doug Aitken, Allora/Calzadilla, Francis Alys, Ed Atkins, John Baldessari, Yto Barrada, Vanessa Beecroft, Alighiero e Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Glenn Brown, Angela Bulloch, Maurizio Cattelan, Chuck Close, Tacita Dean, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Trisha Donnelly, Tracey Emin, Omer Fast, Robert Frank, Katharina Fritsch, Cyprien Gaillard, Ellen Gallagher, Adrian Ghenie, Gilbert & George, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Andreas Gursky, David Hammons, Rachel Harrison, Christian Jankowski, Annette Kelm, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Jannis Kounellis, Lee Kit, Zoe Leonard, Liu Xiaodong, Paul McCarthy, Marilyn Minter, Tracey Moffatt, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Bruce Nauman, Gabriel Orozco, Richard Phillips, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, RH Quaytman, Charles Ray, Jason Rhoades, Pipilotti Rist, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Thomas Ruff, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Gregor Schneider, Shirana Shahbazi, Cindy Sherman, Roman Signer, Dayanita Singh, Hito Steyerl, Beat Streuli, Thomas Struth, Sturtevant, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sam Taylor-Wood, Diana Thater, Rosemarie Trockel, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo, Charline von Heyl, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Wool, and Yang Fudong.

Parkett editions, from top: Doug Aitken, Decrease the Mass and Run like Hell, 1999, for Parkett 57; Vanessa Beecroft, untitled, 1999, for Parkett 56; Andy Warhol, untitled, 1987, for Parkett 12, 1987; David Hammons, Money Tree, 1992, for Parkett 31; Wolfgang Tillmans, Parkett edition 1992–1998, for Parkett 53; Trisha Donnelly, The Dashiell Delay, 2006 (2), for Parkett 77; Shirana Shahbazi, Composition with Mountain, 2014, for Parkett 94; Sigmar Polke, Desastres und andere bare Wunder, 1982–1984, for Parkett 2; Cindy Sherman, untitled, 1991, for Parkett 29; Jannis Kounellis, untitled, 1985, for Parkett 6; Tracey Emin, Self-Portrait, 12.11.01, for Parkett 63; Franz Ackermann, Peak Season, 2003, for Parkett 68. Images courtesy and © the artists and Parkett.


ABSTRACT FIGURATION

Earlier this year, former Interview editor and Vanity Fair special correspondent Bob Colacello made his curatorial debut with THE AGE OF AMBIGUITY: ABSTRACT FIGURATION/FIGURATIVE ABSTRACTION at the Vito Schnabel Gallery in St. Moritz.

The catalogue—published by Schnabel, with text by Colacello—is an 82-page hardcover featuring work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Jeff Elrod, Jacqueline Humphries, Rashid Johnson, Adam McEwen, Sterling Ruby, Borna Sammak, Jonas Wood, Vito’s father Julian Schnabel, and Bob’s former employer Andy Warhol.

“As the 21st century grapples its way through its second decade, America seems to have entered what may be called The Age of Ambiguity, a time when everything is fluid and nothing concrete, and confusion overwhelms certainty… It is said that the best artists are the antennae of their society, the prophets of their era. Is it any wonder, then, that many younger American painters and sculptors have long abandoned the bygone absolutisms of Minimalism on one hand and Hyper-Realism on the other and are making works today that hover in a hard to define space that might be called Abstract Figuration or Figurative Abstraction?” — Bob Colacello*

BOB COLACELLO, THE AGE OF AMBIGUITY (Vito Schnabel, 2017). Edition: 1000.

SKYLIGHT BOOKS, 1818 North Vermont Avenue, Los Feliz, Los Angeles.

BOOK SOUP, 8818 Sunset Boulevard, West Hollywood.

ART CATALOGUES, LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

vitoschnabel.com/fr/publications/the-age-of-ambiguity

vitoschnabel.com/fr/projets/group-show7/artworks?view=slider

* artnet.com/galleries/vito-schnabel/the-age-of-ambiguity-curated-by/

Top: Exhibition catalogue. Bottom: The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Landscape with Travelers Resting, 2015. Both images courtesy of the Vito Schnabel Gallery.

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ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAY 4: REFLECTIONS ON DEPARTURE

Paris, LA’s final day at Art Basel was spent perusing missed booths at the Miami Beach Convention Center’s main fair, and soaking up the last few rays of sunshine on the beach. There was perhaps no better way to bookend a whirlwind tour of art and culture on both sides of Biscayne Bay, stretching into late night and early morning parties.

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The Saturday and Sunday crowd was noticeably more casual than at Wednesday’s VIP preview, and a number of works had been replaced with others, having been bought off the wall by collectors earlier in the week. Still, a number of standouts remained. Katharina Fritsch’s bright orange Octopus drew viewers into Matthew Marks’s booth, where a stunning new Ellsworth Kelly aluminum wall sculpture was displayed near polyurethane objects by Fischli/Weiss and a photograph by Thomas Demand. Luhring Augustine displayed one of Rachel Whitread’s Untitled (Stories) sculptures, a cast of the negative space around books on a shelf, which the artist later used in her poetic Vienna Holocaust Memorial.

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Some works humorously reappeared, referenced by other artists. Doug Aitken’s Exit (Large), on display in Regen Projects’ booth, appeared in an Eric Fischl painting not far away. Jeff Koons’s Balloon Rabbit appeared suspended upside down from a totem pole in a Jason Rhodes sculpture, on display at David Zwirner’s Basel booth.

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Fergus McCaffrey presented a colorful survey of Jack Early works, particularly homoerotic paintings of crotch close-ups on children’s wallpaper, featuring cheerful hand-holding soldiers. A canary yellow phonograph in the center of the gallery played Early’s “Biography in 20 Minutes”, recounting how the artist chose the wallpaper for his first bedroom, further referencing his memories of queer childhood and early budding sexuality. Another arresting survey show was Alison Knowles’s The Boat Book, sponsored by James Fuentes of New York. A series of wooden frames painted and draped in silkscreens, prints, photographs and maritime diagrams, The Boat Book looks like an unfolded large-scale scrapbook, memorializing the artist’s fisherman brother.

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Urs Fischer’s Small Rain drew curious crowds to the Sadie Coles HQ, London booth. Nearby Galerie Buchholz’s booth featured a stunning mechanistic sculpture by newcomer Simon Denny, with the familiar Snapchat ghost logo embedded like a 3D phantom in a plastic cube atop a computer server. Artist Sean Raspet also drew crowds to Société gallery’s booth in the Nova section with a wall of plastic tanks filled with a manufactured green polyether substance.

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Hauser & Wirth exhibited an impressive new teardrop-shaped sculpture by Mark Bradford. Other fair favorites included Jose Dávila, whose marble and glass slabs precariously pitched outward on colorful red and orange straps were shown at a half dozen galleries from Latin America, Europe, and the United States. Sherrie Levine’s minimalist objects in glass cases were scattered all over the winding Basel booths.

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At the booth for famed editions workshop and gallery Gemini G.E.L., new works by Richard Serra, Julie Mehretu, and Sophie Calle were on display. Serra’s monochromatic black Rift series was partly inspired by rubbings of asphalt textures in the Gemini parking lot. Mehretu’s Myriads, Only By Dark, composed of many layers of finely colored inks and intricately textured gestures in black, took over a year to complete. Calle’s work, In Memory of Frank Gehry’s Flowers, featured a collage cut-out of dried flowers given to the artist by her friend, architect Frank Gehry, in honor of her exhibition openings, alongside photographs of the flowers when fresh and a vase of real roses designed by Gehry himself.

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Between 250 galleries at Art Basel alone, 10 independent art fairs, and countless events, parties, exhibition openings, performances, and lectures, it was truly impossible to see it all here in Miami this week. Some important lessons were learned: few people come to Miami Beach in early December to view artwork. Perusing the fairs is like speed-dating high culture–there simply isn’t time to stop and study. As the fashion and music industries have teamed up with Art Basel, many more have arrived just for the parties, and parties they find: many of them last late into the night and well past sunrise. And as Art Basel has grown, so has Miami, sprouting gleaming new residential skyscrapers (including the new Zaha Hadid 10 Museum Park) that crowd out the two-lane boulevards and classic white Art Deco hotels.

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If you plan on attending Art Basel Miami Beach next year, don’t forget to pack good walking shoes, your favorite hangover cure, and a well-planned schedule. With the right preparation, you won’t find a better way to spend the first days of winter.

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH – DAY 2

For the second day of our coverage of Art Basel Miami Beach, Paris, LA visited the Pulse and NADA independent art fairs, the Rubell Family Collection, Hans Ulrich Obrist’s “Instagram as an Artistic Medium” panel, and Ryan McNamara’s MEEM 4 Miami: A Story Ballet About the Internet.

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But first, let’s rewind a bit: not content to remain a daytime affair, the cultural events and opening parties during steamy South Beach’s Basel week stretch late into the night. And last night, after a visit to the Untitled. fair, Paris, LA visited the opening party for Peter Marino at the Bass Art Museum. The storied architect of contemporary Gucci and Louis Vuitton branches around the world donated his extensive collection of blue chip contemporary art, including several especially commissioned Damien Hirsts, for the show. The galleries were awash with especially salable black paintings, gold-lacquered skulls, and morbid readymades, like a gas mask case. Most press cited the show as proof of Art Basel’s pop apotheosis, though that was confirmed further by the Jeffrey Deitch-hosted Miley Cyrus concert later in the night.

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In the lobby level of the Bass was Gold, a flashy show that encapsulated the ostentatious displays of wealth at Art Basel. Although the curatorial text hinted that the present artworks’ use of gold was intended to be critical, it wasn’t clear of what. Instead, visitors saw two rooms of shiny things–reinforcing the commodity status of the art object, in the midst of a large commercial art fair.

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Outside the museum, in Collins Park, a public sculpture display and performance featured a Lynda Benglis fountain and a fascinating Alfredo Jaar piece with revolving speaker heads speaking in a robotic drone. Visitors lined up to stand inside Truth, and others spraypainted, carved up, and reassembled a wooden wall in a participatory piece by Christian Falsnaes (a work whose best aspect was also its worst: the utter inconsequence of its ultimate form). Finally, the night ended at the Artsy Dance Party, hosted by Carter Cleveland and Wendi Murdoch at the historic Moore building in honor of Chinese painter Shen Wei, which featured a performance by rapper Theophilius London.

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Thursday: there was little sleep do be had before Paris, LA was back at it again, this time perusing some of Miami’s many independent art fairs. The morning began (with strong Cuban coffee in hand) at Pulse, on the shorts of Indian Creek Park. There Danziger Gallery exhibited contemporary Dutch portraits by Hendrik Kerstens, using plastic bags and hand towels as traditional Flemish headwear. Unique at Pulse was an African presence, with photographs by Pieter Hugo, Malick Sidibé, and others.

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Elizabeth Leach Gallery of Portland exhibited drawings and wall sculptures made of tessellated paperback book scraps by Ann Hamilton. Nearby, Leslie Heller Workspace of New York gave a solo presentation of Lothar Osterburg, who makes photogravures of miniature models of mid-20th century New York City.

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Greg Kucera Gallery from Seattle exhibited work by Los Angeles-based artist Chris Engman, who photographs sculptures and installations to suggest intense depth in a truly stunning tromp l’oeil trick.

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Next Paris, LA travelled north to NADA, the New Art Dealers Alliance. Just within the hall entrance, London-based Jonathan Viner’s booth impressed with works by Amir Nikravan (who recently closed a show at VSF Los Angeles), Nicholas Deshayes, and Pentti Monkkonen.

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Nextdoor, New York’s Lisa Cooley displayed work by Andy Coolquitt and others. Los Angeles-based François Ghebaly Gallery’s booth featured a graph-paper drawing by Channa Horowitz and a photograph by Charlie White. London’s Ibid Projects exhibited new paintings by Jack Conway, whose work is also currently on display at their L.A. branch. Featuring flying bill notes and sacks of gold, Conway ironically captured the high-octane spending at Art Basel, much more effectively than the Bass Museum’s gaudy exhibition.

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Other striking booths at NADA including Night Gallery of Los Angeles, Frutta of Rome, and Tomorrow of New York, with its rainbow resin ant farm.

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After a quick break to feel the soft sand and warm seawater outside NADA at the Deauville Beach Resort, Paris, LA headed to the mainland neighborhood of Wynwood to see the Rubell Family Collection.

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Founded by hoteliers Donald and Mera Rubell, the collection features a laundry list of influential American and British artists–primarily from the 1980s–housed in the former DEA headquarters of “Miami Vice” fame, where confiscated cocaine and Kalashnikovs were stored. The galleries were full of works by Richard Prince, Robert Longo, Jeff Koons, Jason Rhoades, Glenn Ligon, and Charles Ray.

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The lobby featured a new commission by Kaari Upson: a silicone and spandex mattress cast over a fiberglass frame, caked in sooty black charcoal dust.

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After a quick bite near the Keith Haring-decorated Wynwood Walls, Paris, LA headed back to Art Basel for “Instagram As an Artistic Medium”, a Digital Talk panel discussion featuring curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, artist Amalia Ulman, collector Simon de Pury, MoMA PS1 Director Klaus Biesenbach, and Instagram founder Kevin Systrom, moderated by ForYourArt founder Bettina Korek. After discussing each of their projects and how they involve Instagram, the panelists wondered how the format of a social media platform may be similar or different from past art.

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Biesenbach cited On Kawara and Yoko Ono as two artists who predicted the seriality and repetition of Twitter and Instagram, and said that Instagramming his bedroom window every day had seriously affected his sense of time and change. Korek argued that Instagram shouldn’t count as “art” because it isn’t trying to be art at all, but rather a kind of filtered documentation. Finally, the panelists wrapped up with a brief argument over the nature of authenticity: while Systrom stated that the freedom to choose a subject and frame it makes Instagram an authentic platform, Ulman wondered aloud whether preselected screens or filters subvert this presumed authenticity.

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Finally, after a brief break for drinks at Disaronno’s party at the Art Deco Gale Hotel, Paris, LA attended Ryan McNamara’s MEEM 4 Miami: A Story Ballet about the Internet, commissioned by Performa. There were truly no bad seats in the house as audience members were carted around by trained workers to various parts of the theater (and even a secret back room), where dancers performed for groups of 10-20 people at a time individually, in pairs, or triplets.

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Once the audience had fragmented, perspectives shifted constantly. It was difficult to determine when one’s seat position would change, as the lifts always picked up the theater’s chairs from behind. In all, the dancers performed feverishly for over an hour, ending in the balcony as the music collapsed into itself, with a disjointed mashup of pop hits.

Stay tuned tomorrow for Day 3 of Art Basel Miami Beach.