Tag Archives: Joan Los Angeles

RACHEL MASON IN CONVERSATION

This weekend, Joan Los Angeles presents an online conversation with CIRCUS OF BOOKS director Rachel Mason and producers Cynthia Childs, Kathryn Robson, and Rhianon Jones, moderated by Evan Moffitt.

For over thirty-five years, the gay porn shop Circus of Books served as an epicenter for LGBT life and culture in Los Angeles. Unbeknownst to many in the community it served, the store was cultivated and cared for by its owners, Karen and Barry Mason—a straight couple with three children. The documentary CIRCUS OF BOOKS is an intimate portrait of the Masons and their journey to become one of the biggest distributors of hardcore gay porn in the United States. Their story unfolds through the lens of their daughter, filmmaker and artist, Rachel Mason.

RACHEL MASON’S CIRCUS OF BOOKS—A VIRTUAL CONVERSATION MODERATED BY EVAN MOFFITT

Sunday, May 24.

4 pm on the West Coast; 7 pm East Coast.

The West Hollywood outpost of Circus had a brief resurrection in the Spring of 2020.

From top: Circus of Books, West Hollywood facade; Karen Mason taking stock; Circus of Books poster; Rachel Mason in 2019 at the Tribeca Film Festival presentation of Circus of Books; the Silver Lake location at Sunset Junction. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker and Netflix.

JENNIFER WEST VIRTUAL PUBLIC CONVERSATION

On the occasion of Jennifer West’s exhibition FUTURE FORGETTING, Joan Los Angeles presents an online conversation with West, writer Norman Klein, and curator Lauren Mackler—organized by David Matorin.

See link below for details.

JENNIFER WEST IN CONVERSATION

Sunday, April 19.

4 pm on the West Coast; 7 pm East Coast.

Jennifer West, Future Forgetting, Joan Los Angeles, February 28, 2020–April 26, 2020. Artwork and installation views courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, and Joan Los Angeles.

PAULINE BOUDRY AND RENATE LORENZ — MOVING BACKWARDS

We do not feel represented by our governments and do not agree with decisions taken in our name. We witness European nations building giant walls and fences around borders that already didn’t seem useful in the first place, rejecting rescue ships at the harbors. Philosopher Achille Mbembe speaks of the “Society of Enmity.” Queer scholar José Esteban Munoz calls the here and now a “prison house.” People stop using gender neutral language and move from their polyamorous groups into traditional families. Hate speech not only seems acceptable, but becomes a motor of aggressively arresting us into what is considered a normal life. Do you sometimes feel as if you are massively being forced to move backwards?

We have, of course, no recipe. But after taking a deep breath we are up for turning disadvantage into a tool: Let’s collectively move backwards…

Women of the Kurdish guerrillas wore their shoes the wrong way round to walk from one place in the snowy mountains to the other. This tactic saved their lives. It seems as if you are walking backwards, but actually you are walking forwards. Or the other way around.

Let’s take this story as a starting point for the project: Can we use the tactical ambivalence of this movement as a means of coming together, re-organizing our desires, and finding ways of exercising freedoms? Can its feigned backwardness even fight the notion of progress’ inevitability?

We will move backwards and think about the ways in which we wish to live with loved but also unloved others. We will move backwards, because strange encounters might be a pleasant starting point for something unforeseen to happen. — Renate and Pauline

This weekend, Joan presents the United States premiere of Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz’ 2019 Venice Biennale video installation MOVING BACKWARDS.

The Venice iteration in the Swiss Pavilion—curated by Charlotte Laubard—incarnated a nightclub environment, and the opening weekend in Los Angeles will feature a live performance by Marbles Jumbo Radio.

PAULINE BOUDRY and RENATE LORENZ—MOVING BACKWARDS

Opening Night

Saturday, December 7, from 7 pm.

PAULINE BOUDRY and RENATE LORENZ IN CONVERSATION WITH ANNE ELLEGOOD

Sunday, December 8, at 4 pm.

Performances

Opening Night at 7 pm and Sunday, December 8, from noon to 4 pm.

Joan

1206 Maple Avenue, suite 715, downtown Los Angeles.

In addition to Marbles Jumbo Radio, performers in the video include Julie Cunningham, Werner Hirsch, Latifa Laâbissi, and Nach.

The MOVING BACKWARDS exhibition catalog is available from Skira.

Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz, Moving Backwards, 2019, installation and performance photographs from the 58th Venice Biennale, Swiss Pavilion. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, the performers, la Biennale di Venezia, and Skira.

HARRY DODGE — WORKS OF LOVE

At Tufts, outside Boston, the exhibition HARRY DODGE—WORKS OF LOVE brings together sculptures, drawings, and videos that “revel as much in theoretical ideas about a post-human future as they do in the ecstasy of the workaday present.”*

This week join Dodge and Amy Sillman in a public conversation for the annual Beckwith Lecture at the Museum of Fine Arts.

HARRY DODGE—WORKS OF LOVE*

Though April 14.

Tufts University Art Gallery

Aidekman Arts Center

40 Talbot Avenue, Medford.

HARRY DODGE and AMY SILLMAN

Wednesday, March 6, at 7 pm.

Museum of Fine Arts

Remis Auditorium

465 Huntington Avenue, Boston.

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HARRY DODGE—WORKS OF LOVE is an expanded version of Dodge’s 2018 show at Joan, Los Angeles.

From top: Harry Dodge, Emergency Weapon #26Harry Dodge, Emergency Weapon #21Harry Dodge, Works of Love installation view, Joan, Los Angeles, 2018. Photograph by Paul Salveson. Images courtesy the artist.