Tag Archives: Juliette Binoche

KIEŚLOWSKI AT THE EGYPTIAN

Apart from being a distinguished artist, Kieslowski had a striking moral authority. Both in his private and public life, he was known as an honest and straightforward man… He was all opposites: his love for others was covered by an outer harshness. This was because he was afraid of lies in public life: he was very severe and refused to compromise… Everything about his life was “clean”—all was transparent.Krzysztof Zanussi

The American Cinematheque’s SHORT SERIES ABOUT KRZYSZTOF KIEŚLOWSKI features a pair of double features and a Sunday triple-bill of the director’s valedictory TROIS COULEURS films.

The series opens with A SHORT FILM ABOUT LOVE and A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING—both 1988—the full-length versions of two of the filmmaker’s Decalogue episodes.

Friday night features a masterworks double bill: THE DOUBLE LIFE OF VÉRONIQUE (1991)—with Irène Jacob in a dual role—and BLIND CHANCE (1981), starring Bogusław Linda, and presented in its complete original form.

The series wraps on Sunday with the trilogy marathon BLUE (1993), WHITE (1994), and RED (1994), Kieślowski’s final features.

A SHORT FILM ABOUT LOVE and A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING

Thursday, September 5, at 7:30 pm.

THE DOUBLE LIFE OF VÉRONIQUE and BLIND CHANCE

Friday, September 6, at 7:30 pm.

BLUE, WHITE, and RED

Sunday, September 8, at 5 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Krzysztof Kieślowski, from top: Irène Jacob in The Double Life of Véronique; Grażyna Szapołowska in A Short Film About Love; Mirosław Baka in A Short Film About Killing; Bogusław Linda (left) in Blind Chance; Juliette Binoche in Blue; Julie Delpy in White; Jacob in Red. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker’s estate, the artists, the photographers, and the distributors.

ASSAYAS DOUBLE BILL AT THE AERO

To mark the release of NON-FICTION—the new film from Olivier Assayas—the American Cinematheque presents a double feature of Assayas’ 1996 cult film IRMA VEP and a 35mm presentation of his 2008 masterpiece SUMMER HOURS. Both screen on Thursday.

NON-FICTION will screen the following night.

IRMA VEP and SUMMER HOURS

Thursday, May 2, at 7:30 pm.

NON-FICTION

Friday, May 3, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Maggie Cheung in Irma Vep; Jérémie Renier (left) and Olivier Assayas on set, Summer Hours; Édith Scob and Juliette Binoche in Summer Hours; Renier, Dominique Reymond, and Charles Berling in Summer Hours; Jean-Pierre Léaud (right) and Cheung in Irma Vep.

CLAIRE DENIS IN SANTA MONICA

For the opening night of the American Cinematheque program Salt, Sweat and Sunshine—The Cinema of Claire Denis, the director will join L.A. Times writer Mark Olsen for an onstage conversation at the Aero, followed by a double-bill of CHOCOLAT and WHITE MATERIAL, both of which reference Denis’ upbringing in colonial French Africa.

On Saturday afternoon, Denis will present BEAU TRAVAIL and participate in a post-screening discussion with Justin Chang.

Double-features will fill the rest of the weekend, with pairings of NÉNETTE ET BONI with 35 RHUMS, both with Alex Descas, and TROUBLE EVERY DAY with LET THE SUNSHINE IN, each featuring Nicolas Duvauchelle.

CLAIRE DENIS—CHOCOLAT and WHITE MATERIAL

Friday, April 12, at 7:30

CLAIRE DENIS—BEAU TRAVAIL

Saturday, April 13, at 5 pm.

NÉNETTE ET BONI and 35 RHUMS

Saturday, April 13, at 7:30 pm.

TROUBLE EVERY DAY and LET THE SUNSHINE IN

Sunday, April 14, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1321 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Cécile Ducasse and Isaach De Bankolé in Chocolat (1988); Alice Houri in Nénette et Boni (1996); Grégoire Colin (left) and Denis Lavant in Beau Travail (1999); Béatrice Dalle in Trouble Every Day (2001); Mati Diop and Alex Descas in 35 rhums (2008); Isabelle Huppert in White Material (2009); Juliette Binoche and Nicolas Duvauchelle in Let the Sunshine In (2017).

CLAIRE DENIS — HIGH LIFE

HIGH LIFE is a space mystery and it’s a new film directed by Claire Denis, which are the only two things you need to know before going to see it.

(But between your first and second viewing, you’ll want to read as much as you can. And remember that one of Denis’ favorite songs is The Beach Boys‘ “In My Room”—which is not in the film.)

HIGH LIFE

Now playing

Arclight Hollywood

6360 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles.

The Landmark

10850 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Juliette Binoche and Robert Pattinson in High Life (2018); Binoche, Lars Eidinger, Mia Goth, Pattinson, and Claire Tran; André Benjamin; Jessie Ross and Pattinson. Images courtesy A24.

OLIVIER ASSAYAS’ NON-FICTION

How our habitual engagements with writing, reading, performance, publishing, and politics have been transformed in the internet age are some of the concerns addressed in NON-FICTION (Double vies), the new film from writer-director Olivier Assayas.

The film—Assayas’ seventeenth feature, and one that carries a strong echo of Rohmer—stars Juliette Binoche, Guillaume CanetChrista ThéretVincent MacaigneNora Hamzawi, and Pascal Greggory as denizens of the Parisian culture-media complex, and its Los Angeles premiere this week is part of the annual AFI Fest.

NON-FICTION

Friday, November 9, at 6 pm.

Thursday, November 15, at 12:30 pm.

Chinese Sixplex, 6925 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

See Will Self on the tyranny of the virtual.

Top: Guillaume Canet in Non-Fiction.

Above: Vincent Macaigne (right) and Canet.

Below: Juliette Binoche and Canet.