Tag Archives: Kehinde Wiley

PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ

Peggy Cooper Cafritz—the Washington, D.C., collector of African-American art, salonist, activist, fundraiser, co-founder of the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, and just-published author—died last week in the capital.

Her 2018 book FIRED UP! READY TO GO!—FINDING BEAUTY, DEMANDING EQUITY brings together images of more than 200 works of art that were lost in a 2009 house fire, as well as the art Cooper Cafritz had collected in the years since the catastrophe.

The Cooper Cafritz collection includes pieces by Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Edward Mitchell Bannister, Alma Thomas, Norman Lewis, Kara Walker, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas, El Anatsui, Yinka Shonibare, Nick Cave, Kehinde Wiley, Glenn Ligon, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae WeemsNoah Davis, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Titus KapharNjideka Akunyili Crosby, and Toyin Ojih Odutola.

PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ, FIRED UP! READY TO GO!—FINDING BEAUTY, DEMANDING EQUITY: AN AFRICAN AMERICAN LIFE IN ART, THE COLLECTIONS OF PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ (New York: Rizzoli , 2018).

Contributors to the book’s text include Thelma Golden, Simone Leigh, Uri McMillan, Jack ShainmanTschabalala Self.

From top: Torkwase Dyson, Strange Fruit (Blue Note), 2015, acrylic on board; Romare Bearden, Prince Cinque (Maquette), 1976, felt pen with watercolor and collage on graph paper; Jas Knight, Autumn, 2015, oil on linen; Loren Holland, The Messenger, 2005, oil on paper; Noah Davis, Black Widow, 2007, acrylic and gouache on canvas; Nina Chanel Abney, Untitled, 2012. All images © the artists, courtesy the Estate of Peggy Cooper Cafritz, and Rizzoli.

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

The official portraits of President Obama and Michelle Obama were unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery today. The Obamas were joined onstage by artists Kehinde Wiley (Barack Obama) and Amy Sherald (Michelle Obama). Shonda Rhimes, Steven Spielberg, and Eric Holder were in the audience to celebrate the occasion.

The portraits are the latest addition to the newly renovated America’s Presidents Gallery at the NPG.

 

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, 8th Street and F Street NW, Washington, D.C.

npg.si.edu/exhibition/obama-portraits-unveiled

See: washingtonpost.com/obamas-portraits

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DARRYL PINCKNEY ON DANA SCHUTZ AND HER DETRACTORS

“[The black presence in the contemporary art scene] almost feels as though an Occupy High Art movement is happening….How black people have been seen in history continues to influence how they are seen today. Yet the high visibility of blacks in the art world hasn’t done away with the critical defensiveness that made the controversy at this year’s Whitney Biennial over Dana Schutz’s painting of Emmett Till such an embarrassing turf war among the second-rate. Till, age 14, was beaten to death in 1955 in Mississippi for supposedly having whistled at a white woman. The painting has no power unless, or until, you think of the horrific image of Till in his open casket on which it was based.”

From Darryl Pinckney, “The Trickster’s Art” (a piece on Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Kehinde Wiley, and the Regarding the Figure show at the Studio Museum in Harlem), New York Review of Books LXIV.13 (August 17, 2017): 50.

Pinckney is a novelist, longtime contributor to The New York Review, and partner of James Fenton (who was introduced to Pinckney by Susan Sontag in the Paris Bar in Berlin in 1990). Pinckney’s latest book—Black Deutschland: A Novel—is the story of a young, gay, post-drug-rehab Chicagoan in 1980s Berlin.

See Deesha Philyaw’s Rumpus interview with Pinckney.

Left to right: New York Review of Books editor Robert Silvers, Darryl Pinckney, publisher Rea Hederman, and, seated, Susan Sontag.

Photograph by Dominique Nabokov.