Tag Archives: Keith Haring

JOHN GIORNO

I am standing on the corner of Stanton and Chrystie,
waiting for the traffic light to change.
A man is sitting on the steps of a building
holding his young son on his lap.
He is eating fried chicken
from Chico’s take-out on Houston.
He chews on the wings
and feeds bits of the breast to his son. The man finishes eating
and puts the leftover chicken and bones,
french fries and soda can in a paper bag
and leaves it on the sidewalk.
A brown dog from a neighboring building,
snoops around
gets his nose in the bag,
chews on the bones
and makes a mess.
The man hits the dog with a newspaper,
and it yelps and runs away.
A black cat sitting in a window,
watches wide-eyed,
staring down at the dog,
chicken bones and gristle. I see their past and present lives.
The man eats the chicken
and the chicken
was his mother,
who had died of cancer two years ago; the dog chewing on the bones
was his father,
who had died of a heart attack five years ago;
and the cat in the window
was his grandmother;
and his young son, whom he holds so tenderly,
was the man who killed him in his previous life.
His wife comes home with groceries
and takes the boy into the building.
She had been his lover in many past lives,
and was his mother for the first time in this one.
The world just makes me laugh. Fill what is empty,
empty what is full,
light
as body,
light
as breath.Welcoming the flowers:
daffodils
baptized in butter,
lilacs lasciviously licking the air,
necklaces of wisteria
bowing to magnolia mamas,
the cherry blossoms are razor blades,
the snow dahlias are sharp as cat piss,
the lilies of the valley are
lilies of fur,
lilies of feather,
lilies of fin,
lilies of skin,
the almost Miss America rose,
the orchids are fat licking tongues,
and they all smell so good
and I am sucked into their meaty earthy goodness. You make
my heart
feel warm,
I lay my head on your chest
and feel free,
filling
what is empty,
emptying
what is full,
filling what is
empty, emptying
what is full,
filling what is empty, emptying what is full,
filling what is empty, emptying what is full,
the gods
we know
we are,
the gods
we knew
we were.I smell you
with my eyes,
see you
with my ears,
feel you
with my mouth,
taste you
with my nose,
hear you
with my tongue,
I want you to sit
in my heart,
and smile. Words come from sound,
sound comes from wisdom,
wisdom comes from emptiness,
deep relaxation
of great perfection. Welcoming the flowers:
armfuls of honey suckle
and columbine,
red-tipped knives of Indian paint brush,
the fields of daisies are the people
who betrayed me
and the lupine were self-serving and unkind,
the voluminous and voluptuous bougainvillea
are licking fire loving what it cannot burn,
the big bunch of one thousand red roses
are all the people I made love to,
hit my nose with stem of a rose,
the poppies have pockets packed with narcotic treats,
the chrysanthemums are a garland of skulls. I go to death
willingly,
with the same comfort and bliss
as when I lay my head
on my lover’s chest. Welcoming the flowers:
the third bouquet is a crown of blue bells,
a carillon of foxglove,
a sunflower snuggles its head on my lap
and gazes up at the sky,
may all the tiny black insects
crawling on the peony petals
be my sons and daughters in future lives,
great balls of light
radiating white, red, blue
concentric dazzle,
yellow, green
great exaltation,
the world just makes me laugh. May sound and light
not rise up and appear as enemies,
may I know all sound as my own sound,
may I know all light as my own light,
may I spontaneously know all phenomena as myself,
may I realize original nature,
not fabricated by mind,
empty
naked awareness. — John Giorno

John Giorno—poet, artist, organizer, AIDS activist, Buddhist, catalyst, muse, husband of Ugo Rondinone, star of Andy Warhol’s Sleep—died last week at home: 222 Bowery in lower Manhattan.

From top: John Giorno at the Chelsea Hotel, New York City, 1965, photograph by William S. Burroughs; Giorno, Don’t Wait for Anything; Giorno with Ugo Rondinone (right) in front of Rondinone’s Target, New York City, 2005; Andy Warhol, Sleep (1963), still; Giorno performing at the Tibetan Benefit, Washington Square Methodist Church, New York, 1974, photographed by Gianfranco Mantegna, courtesy the John Giorno Archives, New York; poster for the Nova Convention, 1978, organized by Giorno, James Grauerholz, and Sylvère Lotringer; Keith Haring (left), Burroughs, and Giorno in 1987 at a shooting range in Lawrence, Kansas, where Burroughs lived after leaving New York City, photograph by Kate Simon; Brooklyn Rail poster for performance events during the exhibition Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno; Giorno, The World Just Makes Me Laugh. Images courtesy and © the John Giorno Archives, the artists, the filmmakers, and the photographers.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT

The Death of Michael Stewart—a 1983 painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat commonly known as Defacement—was Basquiat’s response to the killing of tagger Michael Stewart at the hands of New York City transit cops.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY—at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum—explores of the impact of Stewart’s death on the lower Manhattan art community.

The exhibition—organized by Chaédria LaBouvier—includes work by David Hammons, Keith Haring, Lyle Ashton Harris, George Condo, and Andy Warhol. A film series will play in conjunction with the show (see link below for details).

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY

Through November 6.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top:  Jean-Michel Basquiat, Defacement (The Death of Michael Stewart), 1983, acrylic and marker on wood, collection of Nina Clemente, New York, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2018; David HammonsThe Man Nobody Killed, 1986, stenciled paint on commercially printed cardboard with cut-and-taped photocopy from a spiral bound periodical with works by various artists, from Eye magazine, no. 14, “Cobalt Myth Mechanics,” 1986, © the Museum of Modern Art, New York, licensed by SCALA / ARS, New York; Keith HaringMichael Stewart, USA for Africa, 1985, enamel and acrylic on canvas, collection of Monique and Ziad Ghandour, © the Keith Haring Foundation; card for benefit at Danceteria, October 3, 1983, collection of Franck Goldberg, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; Jean-Michel BasquiatLa Hara, 1981, acrylic and oil stick on wood panel, Arora CollectionJean-Michel Basquiat, Charles the First, 1982, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, three panels; Lyle Ashton Harris, Saint Michael Stewart, 1994, photograph, courtesy and © Lyle Ashton Harris; Jean-Michel BasquiatUntitled (Sheriff), 1981, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, Carl Hirschmann Collection. Basquiat images courtesy and © the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / Artestar, the collectors, and the photographers.

CONTACT WARHOL — PHOTOGRAPHY WITHOUT END

Drawing from over 130,000 photographic images taken by Andy Warhol and his entourage over the last decade of the artist’s life, CONTACT WARHOL—PHOTOGRAPHY WITHOUT END, at Stanford University, presents a backstage view of Warhol’s working and social life from 1976 to 1987.*

CONTACT WARHOL—PHOTOGRAPHY WITHOUT END

Through January 6.

Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, 328 Lomita Drive, Stanford.

 

CONTACT WARHOL—PHOTOGRAPHY WITHOUT END exhibition catalogue

(Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Stanford, CA: Cantor Arts Center, 2018).

*The photographs that also feature Warhol as subject were likely taken by Bob Colacello, editor of the 1979 book Andy Warhol’s Exposures.

Top: Andy Warhol, photo study for Jane Fonda portrait, 1982.

Above: Two unidentified male models photographed by Warhol for Querelle (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1982) film poster.

Below: Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1984.

BEYOND THE STREETS

Dash Snow, Maripol, Guerrilla Girls, Barry McGee, Kenny Scharf, Shepard Fairey, Jenny Holzer, André Saraiva, Crash, Daze, Taki 183 , and Gordon Matta-Clark are among the artists in BEYOND THE STREETS, the “definitive showcase of graffiti and street art” at Werkartz, curated by Roger Gastman.*

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BEYOND THE STREETS, through July 6.

WERKARTZ, 1667 North Main Street, downtown Los Angeles.

beyondthestreets.com

artsy.net/beyond-the-streets

Top: Martha Cooper, Lil Crazy Legs during shoot for Wild Style, Riverside Park, NY, 1983.

Above: Paul Insect, Now We are Far Away, 2018.

Below: Martha Cooper, Keith Haring Painting Houston/Bowery Wall.

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