Tag Archives: LACMA

FOSSE, VERDON, AND ALL THAT JAZZ

In anticipation of the upcoming limited series FOSSE/VERDON—the story of the personal and professional collaboration between director-choreographer Bob Fosse (1927–1987) and dancer-actor Gwen Verdon (1925–2000)—LACMA presents a screening of Fosse’s extraordinary “semi-autobiographical” film ALL THAT JAZZ (1979), featuring a tour de force performance by the late Roy Scheider.

Three nights later, the museum hosts a big-screen presentation of “Life is a Cabaret,” chapter one of FOSSE/VERDON, which stars Sam Rockwell as Fosse and Michelle Williams as Verdon. The series will air on FX from April 9.

Fosse was one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century dance, and the footprints—and indelible attitude—of his choreography in Cabaret, Chicago, Damn Yankees, The Pajama Game, and Sweet Charity are still apparent in works being created today.

ALL THAT JAZZ

Monday, April 1, at 7:30 pm.

FOSSE/VERDON

Thursday, April 4, at 7:30 pm.

Bing Theater, LACMA

5955 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Michelle Williams as Gwen Verdon and Sam Rockwell as Bob Fosse in Fosse/Verdon(2019); Roy Scheider in All That Jazz; Fosse backstage at New York’s City Center during the 1963 production of Pal Joey; Tab Hunter and Verdon in Damn Yankees (1958), courtesy New York Library for the Performing Arts; Liza Minnelli and Fosse on set, Cabaret (1972); Rockwell and Williams in Fosse/Verdon.

AGNÈS

“Each film has its history, its beauty or not beauty, and its meaning.  The meaning can change over the years for people who watch the film, because there is a lot of evolution in the sense of history, the sense of understanding.  But when you speak about 35 millimeter or DCP or video, it’s unimportant. The film is what it is, but what is different are the people who made the film…

“I change.  I wouldn’t do the same film today about Cuba or about the Panthers or about women.  Each film has a date glued to it.  And what we try is to overcome the date and make a meaning that can be more than 1962 or 1961 or whatever.” — Agnès Varda

Varda—mother of the nouvelle vague—was born outside Brussels, made some of her most important films in California, and died this morning at her home in Paris.

Active into her late eighties, local audiences remember many of her recent trips to Los Angeles, presenting retrospectives at the American Cinematheque and LACMA, giving talks at the AFI festival, and receiving a Governor’s Award from the Academy in 2017.

Varda—who directed Cléo de 5 à 7 in Paris in 1961—and her husband Jacques Demy (1931–1990) first came to Los Angeles in 1966, Demy eventually directing Model Shop (1969) and Varda making shorts—Uncle Yanco, Black Panthers—in preparation for her first California feature, the remarkable Lions Love (… and Lies) (also 1969). Varda’s final completed work is the soon-to-be-released documentary Varda par Agnès.

From top: Agnès Varda on the set of Lions Love (… and Lies); Varda shooting her second feature Cléo de 5 à 7 in Paris in the early 1960s, photograph by Roger Viollet; Anouk Aimée (left), Jacques Demy, and Varda in Los Angeles during the shoot of Demy’s Model Shop; scene from Varda’s Black Panthers (1968), shot in Oakland; Sabine Mamou (right) and Mathieu Demy—Varda and Demy’s son—in Varda’s feature Documenteur (1981), shot in Los Angeles; Venice Beach scene from the documentary Mur Murs (1981); Varda and Jane Birkin on set, Jane B. par Agnès V. (1988), photograph by Jean Ber; Varda in Varda par Agnès (2019). Images courtesy Ciné-Tamaris.

SOUL OF A NATION SYMPOSIUM

Thelma Golden and Kellie Jones—joined by CAAM‘s departing deputy director and chief curator Naima J. Keith—will participate in the first panel of the SOUL OF A NATION SYMPOSIUM at the Aratani Theatre in Little Tokyo.*

The symposium marks the opening day of the SOUL OF A NATION exhibition at The Broad. Panel 1—which runs from 10:35 am to 11:50 am—will turn on the subject “The Politics of Black Exhibitions.” UC Irvine associate professor Bridget R. Cooks will moderate.

For complete information on the day’s speakers and panels, see the link below.

SOUL OF A NATION SYMPOSIUM

Saturday, March 23, from 10 am to 5:30 pm.

Aratani Theatre

244 San Pedro Street, downtown Los Angeles.

*On April 1, 2019, Keith will join LACMA as the vice president of education and public programs.

From top: Betye Saar, Rainbow Mojo, 1972, acrylic painting on cut leather, courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, photograph by Robert Wedemeyer; Roy DeCarava, Mississippi freedom marcher, Washington, D.C., 1963, photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, courtesy Sherry DeCarava and the DeCarava Archives, © Roy DeCarava; Barkley L. Hendricks, Icon for My Man Superman (Superman Never Saved Any Black People — Bobby Seale), 1969, oil, acrylic and aluminum leaf on linen canvas, © Estate of Barkley L. Hendricks, courtesy of the artist’s estate and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Superman S–Shield © and ™ DC Comics, used with permission.

HAL FOSTER IN CONVERSATION

“I’m a writer first, a critic-historian-theorist second. That said, I’ve never wanted the writing to be self-involved or involuted; I’ve always wanted to be as lucid as possible—difficult but lucid… I don’t like it when criticism becomes subjectivist; that’s not much more than sensibility criticism come again…

“Most people think we are in a ‘post-critical age’; they even hope we are. I understand the fatigue with the negativity of criticism, but mostly that fatigue is laziness—and an anti-intellectualism that is far more American than apple pie ever was. It’s obvious that we need criticism now more than ever.” — Hal Foster*

Hal Foster—who is a visiting Getty scholar this semester and whose new book collects fifteen years of conversations with Richard Serra—recently spoke at LACMA, and will give two more public conversations over the next week or so.

JASON E. SMITH PRESENTS HAL FOSTER

Tuesday, February 26, at 7:30 pm

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

HAL FOSTER AND CHARLES RAY

Wednesday, March 6, at 7:30 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Westwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Hal Foster,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 154.

From top: Hal Foster, courtesy Hammer Museum; book cover credits: Yale University Press; Verso Books (cover illustration, Isa Genzken, X-Ray, 1991, black-and-white photograph, Galerie Buchholz, Berlin and Cologne); The New Press.

ON FLORA MAYO

FLORA—a double-sided film installation by Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler at LACMA—reconstructs the lost history and œuvre of Flora Mayo, the American artist usually associated with Alberto Giacometti.

Also on view: a photographic reproduction and reconstruction of Mayo’s no-longer-extant sculpture Bust.

TERESA HUBBARD/ALEXANDER BIRCHLER—FLORA

Through April 7.

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler, Flora, 2017, film stills (2); Alberto Giacometti and Flora Mayo, still from Teresa Hubbard and Alexander BirchlerBust, 2017. Photograph by Ugo Carmeni. Images courtesy the artists, and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin.