Tag Archives: Laemmle Playhouse 7

HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING

“I’ve believed that straying from structured acts of seeing can produce the strongest connection with an audience.” — RaMell Ross

HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING—a lyrical, experimental documentation of lives in a small Alabama community, directed by RaMell Ross—will screen this week at the Downtown Independent.

Following the film, Ross and Jheanelle Brown, co-curator of Black Radical Imagination, will discuss the writer-director’s work.

Ross will also present the film at the Hammer Museum and the Aero in early 2019

HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING

Wednesday, February 6, at 7:30

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Tuesday, January 8, at 7:30.

Billy Wilder Theater, Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Westwood, Los Angeles.

Thursday, September 20, at 7 pm.

Downtown Independent

251 South Main Street, Los Angeles.

Through Thursday, September 27

Playhouse

673 Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

Monica Film Center

1332 2nd Street, Santa Monica.

Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018). Image credit: Idiom Film.

BARRY LYNDON

Image result for marisa berenson barry lyndon

Misunderstood in Great Britain and the States at the time of its release, BARRY LYNDON (1975) has always been appreciated by Europeans as a work of great beauty, director Stanley Kubrick’s journey into a Visconti-like wonderland.

In the film, Lord Bullingdon is played by Leon Vitali, who quit acting to become Kubrick’s right-hand man. Vitali is the subject of Tony Zierra’s new documentary FILMWORKER.

 

BARRY LYNDON, Saturday, May 19, at 11 am.

FILMWORKER, through May 24.

NUART THEATRE, 11272 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

landmarktheatres.com/barry-lyndon

landmarktheatres.com/nuart-theatre/filmworker

FILMWORKER, May 25 through May 31.

LAEMMLE PLAYHOUSE, 673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

LAEMMLE FINE ARTS, 8556 Wilshire Boulevard, Beverly Hills.

laemmle.com/film

See: dazeddigital.com/why-barry-lyndon-is-stanley-kubricks-masterpiece

Above: Ryan O’Neal and Marisa Berenson in Barry Lyndon.

Below: Berenson.

Related image

Marisa_Berenson_and_Ryan_O'Neal_in_Barry_Lyndon

barry-lyndon-peinado

CLAIRE DENIS’ SUNSHINE

DOSqOjPVQAAn_5K

LET THE SUNSHINE IN—the brilliant new film from Claire Denis that is not, contrary to reports, based on Barthes’ Fragments d’un discours amoureux—has been held over by Laemmle until June 21.

LET THE SUNSHINE IN

June 15 through June 21.

Monica Film Center

1332 2nd Street, Santa Monica.

 

Through June 14:

Royal

11523 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

 

Through June 7:

Playhouse

673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

 

Through May 31:

Town Center

17200 Ventura Boulevard, Encino.

Juliette Binoche (below with Nicolas Duvauchelle) in Let the Sunshine In.

GRACE JONES

2048x2730-articleimage-2634-jpg-7d7c9007

“If the lights should go out, if the sound fails, I can still hold the audience. In the dark, without any trimmings. It’s a lonely place, but it’s a fascinating lonely place.” – Grace Jones

Jones is in her sixties and she can’t understand why everyone nowadays goes to bed so early. Party-goers in New York leaving an affair at 10:30? “They must be depressed.” Paris has turned into a quiet little town? “It’s terrible.” In GRACE JONES – BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI – directed by Sophie Fiennes and shot over several years around the world – she tells a young record spinner, “You’re a DJ, you don’t need sleep.”

Grace still lifts weights, drinks Champagne with breakfast if she feels like it, argues with recalcitrant producers and inept managers, keeps up with her family in Jamaica, and stops shows with “Pull Up to the Bumper” and “Love is the Drug.” (Stage design by the late Eiko Ishioka.) Expertly applying her own maquillage – a Richard Bernstein illustration come to life – and paying her own recording costs from the money she makes at gigs (“I hope the set isn’t too tacky…”), Grace has outlived, outworked, out-parlayed them all. Fiennes documentary – blissfully free of identifying titles and explanatory “wall cards” – is as liberated and liberating as its subject.

img-grace-jones_11334828008

GRACE JONES – BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI, now playing.

NUART THEATRE, through Thursday, April 26.

landmarktheatres.com/nuart-grace-jones

Opens Friday, April 27:

LAEMMLE PLAYHOUSE, 673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

laemmle.com/film

See: latimes.com/grace-jones-sophie-fiennes

Top and below: Grace Jones in Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami. Image credit: Kino Lorber.

Middle: Illustration by Richard Bernstein, October 1984. Image credit: Interview magazine.

Image result for grace jones hula hoop

eight_col_GJ_Pic21_Hula_Hoop_Tongue_out_mid_shot_preview

 

 

THE SQUARE

“Art doesn’t need interpretations. It has enough problems proving that it exists, that it still is legitimate. It’s all voracious cannibalization, cross-references, and cryptic connotations crying to be interpreted…

“Art history fronts for art, and often replaces it altogether. Everything is being historicized now that there is nothing left that’s worth historicizing, and the same goes for the pollution of exhibitions…

“Artists themselves become historians of their own impossibility to survive their art.” — Sylvère Lotringer*

From Lotringer’s lips to the big screen…

THE SQUARE—an uproarious look at at the supposed customs, pretensions, and fears of the inhabitants at the art world’s highest levels—is Ruben Östlund’s follow-up to Force Majeure, and a huge leap forward for the European director.

This farce of miscommunication is largely set in the Museum X-Royal, the former residence of Sweden’s royal family (who have been decommissioned), and derives its title from an actual artwork Östlund created in 2014.

 

THE SQUARE

Now playing.

Arclight Hollywood

6360 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

Landmark

10850 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

*Sylvère Lotringer and Paul Virilio, “A Pitiless Art?,” in The Accident of Art (New York: Semiotext(e), 2005), 33.

Elizabeth Moss (left) and Claes Bang in The Square (2017). Image credit: Magnolia.