Tag Archives: Lucinda Childs

CAP UCLA DANCE SEASON 2019–2020

Alastair Macaulay was unambiguous. Closing his 2018 review of the world premiere of FOUR QUARTETS—a collaboration between choreographer Pam Tanowitz, artist Brice Marden, and composer Kaija Saariaho—with the following paragraph, the former New York Times dance critic made its case for posterity:

If I am right to think this is the greatest creation of dance theater so far this century, we’re fortunate that FOUR QUARTETS will travel to other stages. I long to become more deeply acquainted with the many layers of its stage poetry.

The drawback for Los Angeles audiences is that this landmark work will be performed at Royce Hall in early 2020 only twice—a highlight of a remarkably strong CAP UCLA 2019–2020 dance season.

The season begins at Redcat, where Adam Linder presents THE WANT—a contemporary opera/performance piece based on a play by Bernard-Marie Koltès, with music by Ethan Braun.

Sankai JukuUshio Amagatsu’s all-male troupe of Butoh dancers, performing MEGURI—will be at Royce for one night only, as will Michael Keegan-Dolan’s Teaċ Daṁsa (House of Dance) in a new interpretation of SWAN LAKE, featuring a score by Slow Moving Clouds.

The great ballerina Wendy Whelan will dance at Royce, for two nights, in THE DAY. Choreographed by Lucinda Childs with a score by David Lang, Whelan will be joined onstage by cellist Maya Beiser.

The dance season closes in April 2020 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion with the Dance at the Music Center co-presentation of PALERMO PALERMO, a 1989 work by dance legend Pina Bausch and Tanztheater Wuppertal.

See link below for details.

CAP UCLA 2019–2020 SEASON OF DANCE

From top: Sankai Juku, Meguri; Adam Linder, The Want, photograph by Shahryar Nashat; Michael Keegan-Dolan, Teaċ Daṁsa, Swan Lake, photograph by Colm Hogan; Maya Beiser, Wendy Whelan, Lucinda Childs, and David Lang, The Day; Pina Bausch, Palermo Palermo, photograph by Jochen Viehoff; Pam Tanowitz, Brice Marden, and Kaija Saariaho, Four Quartets, photograph by Maria Baranova. Images courtesy and © the artists and photographers.

JILL JOHNSTON DANCING

In 1963 and 1964, Andy Warhol captured dancer-choreographers Lucinda Childs, Yvonne Rainer, and Freddy Herko, and Village Voice dance critic Jill Johnston with his Bolex—performing in lofts, on rooftops, and at Judson.

These cinematic time capsules will be screened this weekend and next at the Whitney, and in early December at MOMA.

The films include Jill Johnston Dancing, Freddy Herko, Jill and Freddy Dancing, Lucinda Childs, and Shoulder.

 

DO IT YOURSELF—WARHOL AS BALLETOMANE

Saturday, November 17, at 7 pm.

Friday, November 23, at 2 pm.

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

Through March 31.

Whitney Museum of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

 

ANDY WARHOL AT JUDSON

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30.

Saturday, December 8, at 4:30 pm.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER—THE WORK IS NEVER DONE

Through February 3.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Above: Andy WarholJill Johnston Dancing, 1964.

Below: Andy Warhol, Jill and Freddy Dancing, 1963.

Image credit: © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved.

FREDDY

“Freddy was addicted to that moment between the body’s rise and fall.” — FREDDY, by Deborah Lawlor

Freddy Herko was a beautiful, talented dancer, a co-founder (with Diane di Prima, Amiri Baraka, and choreographer James Waring) of the New York Poets Theatre, and—with Lucinda Childs and Yvonne Rainer—a charter member of Judson Dance Theater.

At Warhol’s factory, he was introduced to the wonders of methamphetamine. A runaway addiction commenced, which ended in 1964 when Freddy—age 28, but aging fast—took a great, naked leap into the blue from a fifth-floor loft in Lower Manhattan, the highly amplified sounds of Mozart’s “Coronation Mass” following him out the window.

Herko’s ballet days and Factory nights are revisited in FREDDY, Deborah Lawlor’s 50-minute fantasia—part theater, part dance, part happening. Lawlor (a co-founder of the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles) was an intimate of Herko’s in the ’60s, and knew all of the characters who dance through her piece: Waring (Mel England), Billy Name (Connor Clark Pascale), Ondine (Justice Quinn), Rotten Rita (Jesse Trout), etc. In the title role, Marty Dew ably captures the energy and waste of Herko’s fast trip and long drop, but the piece is anchored by Lawlor’s alter ego—a narrator called “present-day Shelley”—played with grace by former dancer and veteran actor Susan Wilder.

FREDDY—a Fountain Theatre production, playing off-site at the Los Angeles City College’s Vermont Avenue campus—is directed by Frances Loy, with choreography and movement direction by Cate Caplin.

FREDDY, through October 14.

CAMINITO THEATRE, LACC, 855 North Vermont, Los Angeles.

See Tim Teeman, “The Life and Dramatic Death of an Avant-Garde Hero,” The Guardian, October 23, 2014:

theguardian.com/fred-herko-avant-garde-hero

From top:

Fred Herko dancing on rooftop in Manhattan in the early 1960s; Freddy, with Jesse Trout (kneeling left), Connor Clark Pascale (standing right), Justice Quinn (below Pascale); Marty Dew as Herko in Freddy; Herko.

All Freddy photographs by Ed Krieger.

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