Tag Archives: Luhring Augustine

OSCAR TUAZON AT LUHRING AUGUSTINE

Oscar Tuazon’s solo exhibition at Luhring Augustine in Chelsea is on view through mid-June.

“One of Tuazon’s most ambitious projects is an architectural installation entitled ZOME ALLOY, a hollowed wooden structure consisting of eleven traversable polyhedral units, or zomes. The installation is modeled after the Zome Home, a solar powered house in Albuquerque, New Mexico designed by innovators Steve Baer and Holly Baer. One of the defining features of the Baers’ home is a double-paned glass wall that utilizes water as a heating and cooling mechanism. Though passive and sustainable, the system must be manually operated by the home’s residents, an aspect that circles back to Tuazon’s views on sculpture and the way inhabitation actively maintains it…

“For his first exhibition with Luhring Augustine, Tuazon will present a series of sculptures whose dimensions derive from the architectural openings of ZOME ALLOY. Double-paned glass is a device that he often uses to form window sculptures, whose interstices have been filled with materials that disrupt their transparency. This interplay with visibility is a hallmark of Tuazon’s practice. “*

OSCAR TUAZON

Through June 16.

Luhring Augustine

531 West 24th Street, New York City.

Top: Oscar TuazonWater Map (Goshute Aquifer, Spring Valley, NV), 2018. India ink, watercolor, marker on paper.

Below: Tuazon.

Image credit: Tuazon and Luhring Augustine.

SCULPTURE — LUHRING AUGUSTINE

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Sculptures by Rachel WhitereadGlenn Ligon, Christopher Wool, Simone Leigh, Oscar Tuazon, Reinhard Mucha, Tunga, Janine Antoni, Tom Friedman, Roger Hiorns, Phillip King, Martin Kippenberger, Jeremy Moon, Reinhard Mucha, Cady Noland, and Steve Wolfe are now on view at both New York locations of Luhring Augustine.

 

SCULPTURE, through April 14 in Chelsea, and May in Bushwick.

LUHRING AUGUSTINE, 531 West 24th Street, New York City.

LUHRING AUGUSTINE BUSHWICK, 25 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brooklyn.

luhringaugustine.com

luhringaugustine.com/sculpture/press-release

From top: Works by Glenn Ligon, Oscar Tuazon, and Rachel Whiteread. Image credit: Luhring Augustine.

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THE LARRY CLARK COLLECTION

“Symbols are more meaningful than things themselves.”—  Jenny Holzer, from Truisms, in LARRY CLARK—WHITE TRASH

Larry Clark is one of the great New York collectors, and the walls of his Tribeca loft present an ever-changing gallery of the art he has bought, traded, been given by friends, or created himself over the last half century.

LARRY CLARK—WHITE TRASH, at Luring Augustine Bushwick, is an exhibition of artworks from Clark’s personal collection. In addition to the work below, participating artists include: Vito Acconci, Richard Artschwager, Donald Baechler, Max Blagg, Lisa Bowman, Chris Burden, Jeff Elrod, Leo Fitzpatrick, Robert Frank, Paul Gauguin, Robert Gober, Mark Gonzales, Martin Kippenberger, Sherrie Levine, Paul McCarthy, Bjarne Melgaard, Scott Myles, Méret Oppenheim, Jack Pierson, Jason Polan, Sigmar Polke, Christy Rupp, Philip Taaffe, Koichiro Takagi, Sally Webster, Sue Williams, Franz West, Brian Weil, David Wojnarowicz, and Christopher Wool.

LARRY CLARKWHITE TRASH, through June 18.

LUHRING AUGUSTINE BUSHWICK, 25 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brooklyn.

luhringaugustine.com/exhibitions/larry-clark9

 

i-d.vice.com/en_au/article/larry-clark-on-his-astoundingly-eccentric-personal-art-collection

 

Image credits (top to bottom): Joe Andoe, Spaniard in the Works, 2012, oil on canvas; Wade Guyton, Untitled, 2008, Xerox print; Mike Kelley, Blood and Soil (Potato Print), 1989, silkscreen in colors on a silk banner; Richard Prince, Untitled (Joke), 2013, ink jet on canvas; Wallace Berman, Untitled, 1967, verifax collage; Helmut Newton, Larry Clark, Cannes, 1995, photograph; Raymond Pettibon, No Title (They Ought To…), 1985, pen and ink on paper.

Larry Clark’s White Trash

Larry Clark’s White Trash

Marfa Girl: il regista del film Larry Clark fotografato da Helmut Newton

EXHIBITION: JANINE ANTONI AT LUHRING AUGUSTINE

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In her solo show at Luhring Augustine in New York, Janine Antoni cast body parts and household furniture in wax, forming ethereal, surrealist combinations inspired by milagros, small devotional items left by Latin American worshippers at church altars. The show is on view at Luhring Augustine’s Chelsea location until April 25. The exhibition statement is prefaced by the following text by the artist, evocative of her poetic forms and recalling the centrality of ritual dance to her practice:

Throw back your head and sip from the bowl of your own breast. Wear your mother’s pelvic bones as a collar. Become a snake, intertwining your spine with another and crawl across a woven rug. Let your head melt through your lover’s chest and listen for their heart. Embrace someone so fully that your ribs weave to become one.

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ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAY 4: REFLECTIONS ON DEPARTURE

Paris, LA’s final day at Art Basel was spent perusing missed booths at the Miami Beach Convention Center’s main fair, and soaking up the last few rays of sunshine on the beach. There was perhaps no better way to bookend a whirlwind tour of art and culture on both sides of Biscayne Bay, stretching into late night and early morning parties.

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The Saturday and Sunday crowd was noticeably more casual than at Wednesday’s VIP preview, and a number of works had been replaced with others, having been bought off the wall by collectors earlier in the week. Still, a number of standouts remained. Katharina Fritsch’s bright orange Octopus drew viewers into Matthew Marks’s booth, where a stunning new Ellsworth Kelly aluminum wall sculpture was displayed near polyurethane objects by Fischli/Weiss and a photograph by Thomas Demand. Luhring Augustine displayed one of Rachel Whitread’s Untitled (Stories) sculptures, a cast of the negative space around books on a shelf, which the artist later used in her poetic Vienna Holocaust Memorial.

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Some works humorously reappeared, referenced by other artists. Doug Aitken’s Exit (Large), on display in Regen Projects’ booth, appeared in an Eric Fischl painting not far away. Jeff Koons’s Balloon Rabbit appeared suspended upside down from a totem pole in a Jason Rhodes sculpture, on display at David Zwirner’s Basel booth.

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Fergus McCaffrey presented a colorful survey of Jack Early works, particularly homoerotic paintings of crotch close-ups on children’s wallpaper, featuring cheerful hand-holding soldiers. A canary yellow phonograph in the center of the gallery played Early’s “Biography in 20 Minutes”, recounting how the artist chose the wallpaper for his first bedroom, further referencing his memories of queer childhood and early budding sexuality. Another arresting survey show was Alison Knowles’s The Boat Book, sponsored by James Fuentes of New York. A series of wooden frames painted and draped in silkscreens, prints, photographs and maritime diagrams, The Boat Book looks like an unfolded large-scale scrapbook, memorializing the artist’s fisherman brother.

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Urs Fischer’s Small Rain drew curious crowds to the Sadie Coles HQ, London booth. Nearby Galerie Buchholz’s booth featured a stunning mechanistic sculpture by newcomer Simon Denny, with the familiar Snapchat ghost logo embedded like a 3D phantom in a plastic cube atop a computer server. Artist Sean Raspet also drew crowds to Société gallery’s booth in the Nova section with a wall of plastic tanks filled with a manufactured green polyether substance.

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Hauser & Wirth exhibited an impressive new teardrop-shaped sculpture by Mark Bradford. Other fair favorites included Jose Dávila, whose marble and glass slabs precariously pitched outward on colorful red and orange straps were shown at a half dozen galleries from Latin America, Europe, and the United States. Sherrie Levine’s minimalist objects in glass cases were scattered all over the winding Basel booths.

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At the booth for famed editions workshop and gallery Gemini G.E.L., new works by Richard Serra, Julie Mehretu, and Sophie Calle were on display. Serra’s monochromatic black Rift series was partly inspired by rubbings of asphalt textures in the Gemini parking lot. Mehretu’s Myriads, Only By Dark, composed of many layers of finely colored inks and intricately textured gestures in black, took over a year to complete. Calle’s work, In Memory of Frank Gehry’s Flowers, featured a collage cut-out of dried flowers given to the artist by her friend, architect Frank Gehry, in honor of her exhibition openings, alongside photographs of the flowers when fresh and a vase of real roses designed by Gehry himself.

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Between 250 galleries at Art Basel alone, 10 independent art fairs, and countless events, parties, exhibition openings, performances, and lectures, it was truly impossible to see it all here in Miami this week. Some important lessons were learned: few people come to Miami Beach in early December to view artwork. Perusing the fairs is like speed-dating high culture–there simply isn’t time to stop and study. As the fashion and music industries have teamed up with Art Basel, many more have arrived just for the parties, and parties they find: many of them last late into the night and well past sunrise. And as Art Basel has grown, so has Miami, sprouting gleaming new residential skyscrapers (including the new Zaha Hadid 10 Museum Park) that crowd out the two-lane boulevards and classic white Art Deco hotels.

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If you plan on attending Art Basel Miami Beach next year, don’t forget to pack good walking shoes, your favorite hangover cure, and a well-planned schedule. With the right preparation, you won’t find a better way to spend the first days of winter.