Tag Archives: Lyle Ashton Harris

LYLE ASHTON HARRIS AND PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA

Lyle Ashton Harris and Paul Mpagi Sepuya will talk about their practice and participation in IMPLICIT TENSIONS—MAPPLETHORPE NOW, part two of the Guggenheim’s exhibition of the late photographer’s work.

The conversation will be moderated by Robert Reid-Pharr, a scholar in the field of race and sexuality studies and Professor of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University.

LYLE ASHTON HARRIS and PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA

THE IMAGES WE WANT TO SEEIMPLICIT TENSIONS ARTIST PANEL

Tuesday, October 1, at 6:30 pm.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From Top: Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Darkroom Mirror, 2017, inkjet print, © Paul Mpagi Sepuya; Lyle Ashton Harris, Americas, 1987–88, printed 2007, gelatin silver prints, © Lyle Ashton Harris; Robert Mapplethorpe, Ajitto, 1981, © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Images courtesy of the artists and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT

The Death of Michael Stewart—a 1983 painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat commonly known as Defacement—was Basquiat’s response to the killing of tagger Michael Stewart at the hands of New York City transit cops.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY—at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum—explores of the impact of Stewart’s death on the lower Manhattan art community.

The exhibition—organized by Chaédria LaBouvier—includes work by David Hammons, Keith Haring, Lyle Ashton Harris, George Condo, and Andy Warhol. A film series will play in conjunction with the show (see link below for details).

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY

Through November 6.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top:  Jean-Michel Basquiat, Defacement (The Death of Michael Stewart), 1983, acrylic and marker on wood, collection of Nina Clemente, New York, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2018; David HammonsThe Man Nobody Killed, 1986, stenciled paint on commercially printed cardboard with cut-and-taped photocopy from a spiral bound periodical with works by various artists, from Eye magazine, no. 14, “Cobalt Myth Mechanics,” 1986, © the Museum of Modern Art, New York, licensed by SCALA / ARS, New York; Keith HaringMichael Stewart, USA for Africa, 1985, enamel and acrylic on canvas, collection of Monique and Ziad Ghandour, © the Keith Haring Foundation; card for benefit at Danceteria, October 3, 1983, collection of Franck Goldberg, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; Jean-Michel BasquiatLa Hara, 1981, acrylic and oil stick on wood panel, Arora CollectionJean-Michel Basquiat, Charles the First, 1982, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, three panels; Lyle Ashton Harris, Saint Michael Stewart, 1994, photograph, courtesy and © Lyle Ashton Harris; Jean-Michel BasquiatUntitled (Sheriff), 1981, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, Carl Hirschmann Collection. Basquiat images courtesy and © the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / Artestar, the collectors, and the photographers.

OKWUI ENWEZOR

“We knew it was coming but the finality of his passing makes it even more devastating. Okwui was this enormously prophetic figure, wise beyond his years, whose insights—vision, if you will—literally shaped the universe many of us now inhabit. He was like an enormous tree in the glare, whose shadow provided refuge, hospitality, generosity, and love for so many.” — John Akomfrah

Okwui Enwezor—the great historian, curator, writer, editor, and former artistic director of Haus der Kunst—has died in Munich following four years of cancer treatment.

Enwezor, who was 55 at the time of his death, is celebrated for his paradigm-shifting directorship of Documenta 11 in 2002, and the 56th Venice BiennaleAll the World’s Futures—in 2015.

A writer and editor in demand, Enwezor’s contributions will live on in the work of the artists he championed.

From top: Contemporary African Art Since 1980 (2009), by Okwui Enwezor and Chika Okeke-Agulu, image courtesy Damiani; John Akomfrah: Signs of Empire (2018), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy the New Museum; Candice Breitz: The Scripted Life (2010), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Kunsthaus Bregenz; Recent Histories: Contemporary African Photography and Video Art from the Walther Collection (2017), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Steidl and the Walther Collection; Gary Simmons: Paradise (2012), conversation with Enwezor, image courtesy Damiani; Kerry James Marshall: Painting and Other Stuff (2014), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Ludion; Lyle Ashton Harris: Excessive Exposure (2010), text by Enwezor, image courtesy Gregory R. Miller & Co.; Home Lands–Land Marks: Contemporary Art from South Africa (2009), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Haunch of Venison.

LYLE ASHTON HARRIS

“I see myself involved in a project of resuscitation—giving life back to the black male body. I’m teasing at the multiplicities of black male experiences, exploring different subject positions, rather than just recycling the fantasy/projection of the available black stud. Part of the way I complicate this project is by including different representations of myself in most of my work.” — Lyle Ashton Harris

FLASH OF THE SPIRIT, the new exhibition by Lyle Ashton Harris, is up now at Salon 94’s Bowery annex.

LYLE ASHTON HARRIS—FLASH OF THE SPIRIT

Through December 21.

Salon 94 Bowery, 243 Bowery, New York City.

Malik Gaines on Harris.

Harris interviewed by Antwaun Sargent.

Top: Lyle Ashton Harris, Zamble at Land’s End #4, 2018.

Above: Lyle Ashton Harris, Flash of the Spirit, 2018.

Below: Lyle Ashton Harris, Zamble at Land’s End #2, 2018.

All artwork: dye sublimation prints on aluminum.

Images courtesy the artist and Salon 94.