Tag Archives: Lynda Benglis

ART-RITE LAUNCH

Join ART-RITE founding co-editor Walter Robinson, Pat Steir, Robin Winters, moderator Carlo McCormick, and host Jeffrey Deitch for a panel discussion and launch of the facsimile reprint of ART-RITE.

Collected in a 600-plus-page volume, this co-publication of Primary Information and Printed Matter contains all twenty issues of the newsprint magazine edited by Robinson, Edit DeAk, and Joshua Cohn—who would leave after issue 7—between 1973 and 1978.

(DeAk, Robinson, Sol LeWitt, and Lucy Lippard were among Printed Matter’s 1976 co-founders.)

Contributors to ART-RITE included Vito Acconci, Kathy Acker, Bas Jan Ader, Laurie Anderson, David Antin, John Baldessari, Jennifer Bartlett, Gregory Battcock, Lynda Benglis, Mel Bochner, Christian Boltanski, AA Bronson, Marcel Broodthaers, Trisha Brown, Chris Burden, Daniel Buren, Scott Burton, Ulises Carrión, Judy Chicago, Lucinda Childs, Christo, Diego Cortez, Hanne Darboven, Agnes Denes, Ralston Farina, Richard Foreman, Peggy Gale, Gilbert and George, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Leon Golub, Guerrilla Art Action Group, Julia Heyward, Nancy Holt, Ray Johnson, Joan Jonas, Richard Kern, Lee Krasner, Shigeko Kubota, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Babette Mangolte, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Rosemary Mayer, Annette Messager, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Brian O’Doherty, Genesis P-Orridge, Nam June Paik, Charlemagne Palestine, Judy Pfaff, Lil Picard, Yvonne Rainer, Dorothea Rockburne, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, David Salle, Julian Schnabel, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Serra, Sylvia Sleigh, Jack Smith, Patti Smith, Robert Smithson, Holly Solomon, Naomi Spector, Nancy Spero, Pat Steir, Frank Stella, David Tremlett, Richard Tuttle, Alan Vega, Andy Warhol, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, Hannah Wilke, Robert Wilson, and Irene von Zahn.

ART-RITE PANEL and LAUNCH

Tuesday, December 10, at 7 pm.

Jeffrey Deitch

18 Wooster Street, New York City.

From top: Art-Rite (2); Edit DeAk, photograph by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Walter Robinson, photograph by Greenfield-Sanders; Art-Rite facsimile reprint cover; Art-Rite cover by Christo; Art-Rite launch card. Images courtesy and © the photographer, Walter Robinson, Primary Information, and Printed Matter.

MASKULINITÄTEN

What does a feminist exhibition on masculinity look like? This was the question asked by curators Eva Birkenstock, Michelle Cotton, and Nikola Dietrich while organizing MASKULINITÄTEN, their three-part exhibition now open in Bonn, Cologne, and Düsseldorf.

The Bonn section—curated by Cotton, head of Artistic Programmes and Content at Mudam, Luxembourg—includes work by Lynda Benglis, Judith Bernstein, Alexandra Bircken, Patricia L. Boyd, Jana Euler, Hal FischerEunice Golden, Richard Hawkins, Jenny Holzer, Hudinilson Jr., Allison Katz, Mahmoud Khaled, Hilary Lloyd, Sarah Lucas, Robert Morris, D’Ette Nogle, Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), Bea Schlingelhoff, and Anita Steckel.

The Cologne section—curated by Dietrich, director of the Kölnischer Kunstverein—includes Georgia Anderson & David Doherty & Morag Keil & Henry Stringer, Louis Backhouse, Olga Balema, Gerry Bibby, Juliette Blightman, Anders Clausen, Enrico David, Jonathas de Andrade, Jimmy DeSana, Hedi El Kholti, Hilary Lloyd, Shahryar Nashat, Carol Rama, Bea Schlingelhoff, Heji Shin, Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Carrie Mae Weems, Marianne Wex, Martin Wong, and Katharina Wulff.

The presentation in Düsseldorf—curated by Birkenstock, director of the Kunstverein for the Rheinland and Westfalen, Düsseldorf—features the work of Vito Acconci, The Agency, Keren Cytter, Vaginal Davis, Nicole Eisenman, Andrea Fraser, keyon gaskin with Samiya Bashir, sidony o’neal & Adee Roberson, Philipp GuflerAnnette Kennerley, Sister Corita Kent, Jürgen Klauke, Jutta Koether, Tetsumi Kudo, Klara LidénHenrik Olesen, D.A. Pennebaker & Chris Hegedus, Josephine Pryde, Lorenzo Sandoval, Julia Scher, Agnes Scherer, Bea Schlingelhoff, Katharina Sieverding, Nancy Spero, and Evelyn Taocheng Wang.

MASKULINITÄTEN will be accompanied by a catalogue published by Koenig Books, with contributions by—among others—CAConrad, Nelly Gawellek, Chris Kraus, Quinn Latimer, Kerstin Stakemeier, Marlene Streeruwitz, and Änne Söll.

MASKULINITÄTEN

Through November 24.

Bonner Kunstverein

Hochstadenring 22, Bonn.

Kölnischer Kunstverein

Hahnenstrasse 6, Cologne.

Kunstverein Düsseldorf

Grabbeplatz 4, Düsseldorf.

Maskulinitäten, a co-operation of the Bonner Kunstverein, Kölnischem Kunstverein, and Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf, September 1–November 24, 2019. Cologne installation photographs by Mareike Tocha, except second from top and fourth from bottom, by Katja Illner. Images courtesy and © the artists, the institutions, and the photographers.

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH – DAY 2

For the second day of our coverage of Art Basel Miami Beach, Paris, LA visited the Pulse and NADA independent art fairs, the Rubell Family Collection, Hans Ulrich Obrist’s “Instagram as an Artistic Medium” panel, and Ryan McNamara’s MEEM 4 Miami: A Story Ballet About the Internet.

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But first, let’s rewind a bit: not content to remain a daytime affair, the cultural events and opening parties during steamy South Beach’s Basel week stretch late into the night. And last night, after a visit to the Untitled. fair, Paris, LA visited the opening party for Peter Marino at the Bass Art Museum. The storied architect of contemporary Gucci and Louis Vuitton branches around the world donated his extensive collection of blue chip contemporary art, including several especially commissioned Damien Hirsts, for the show. The galleries were awash with especially salable black paintings, gold-lacquered skulls, and morbid readymades, like a gas mask case. Most press cited the show as proof of Art Basel’s pop apotheosis, though that was confirmed further by the Jeffrey Deitch-hosted Miley Cyrus concert later in the night.

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In the lobby level of the Bass was Gold, a flashy show that encapsulated the ostentatious displays of wealth at Art Basel. Although the curatorial text hinted that the present artworks’ use of gold was intended to be critical, it wasn’t clear of what. Instead, visitors saw two rooms of shiny things–reinforcing the commodity status of the art object, in the midst of a large commercial art fair.

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Outside the museum, in Collins Park, a public sculpture display and performance featured a Lynda Benglis fountain and a fascinating Alfredo Jaar piece with revolving speaker heads speaking in a robotic drone. Visitors lined up to stand inside Truth, and others spraypainted, carved up, and reassembled a wooden wall in a participatory piece by Christian Falsnaes (a work whose best aspect was also its worst: the utter inconsequence of its ultimate form). Finally, the night ended at the Artsy Dance Party, hosted by Carter Cleveland and Wendi Murdoch at the historic Moore building in honor of Chinese painter Shen Wei, which featured a performance by rapper Theophilius London.

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Thursday: there was little sleep do be had before Paris, LA was back at it again, this time perusing some of Miami’s many independent art fairs. The morning began (with strong Cuban coffee in hand) at Pulse, on the shorts of Indian Creek Park. There Danziger Gallery exhibited contemporary Dutch portraits by Hendrik Kerstens, using plastic bags and hand towels as traditional Flemish headwear. Unique at Pulse was an African presence, with photographs by Pieter Hugo, Malick Sidibé, and others.

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Elizabeth Leach Gallery of Portland exhibited drawings and wall sculptures made of tessellated paperback book scraps by Ann Hamilton. Nearby, Leslie Heller Workspace of New York gave a solo presentation of Lothar Osterburg, who makes photogravures of miniature models of mid-20th century New York City.

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Greg Kucera Gallery from Seattle exhibited work by Los Angeles-based artist Chris Engman, who photographs sculptures and installations to suggest intense depth in a truly stunning tromp l’oeil trick.

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Next Paris, LA travelled north to NADA, the New Art Dealers Alliance. Just within the hall entrance, London-based Jonathan Viner’s booth impressed with works by Amir Nikravan (who recently closed a show at VSF Los Angeles), Nicholas Deshayes, and Pentti Monkkonen.

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Nextdoor, New York’s Lisa Cooley displayed work by Andy Coolquitt and others. Los Angeles-based François Ghebaly Gallery’s booth featured a graph-paper drawing by Channa Horowitz and a photograph by Charlie White. London’s Ibid Projects exhibited new paintings by Jack Conway, whose work is also currently on display at their L.A. branch. Featuring flying bill notes and sacks of gold, Conway ironically captured the high-octane spending at Art Basel, much more effectively than the Bass Museum’s gaudy exhibition.

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Other striking booths at NADA including Night Gallery of Los Angeles, Frutta of Rome, and Tomorrow of New York, with its rainbow resin ant farm.

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After a quick break to feel the soft sand and warm seawater outside NADA at the Deauville Beach Resort, Paris, LA headed to the mainland neighborhood of Wynwood to see the Rubell Family Collection.

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Founded by hoteliers Donald and Mera Rubell, the collection features a laundry list of influential American and British artists–primarily from the 1980s–housed in the former DEA headquarters of “Miami Vice” fame, where confiscated cocaine and Kalashnikovs were stored. The galleries were full of works by Richard Prince, Robert Longo, Jeff Koons, Jason Rhoades, Glenn Ligon, and Charles Ray.

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The lobby featured a new commission by Kaari Upson: a silicone and spandex mattress cast over a fiberglass frame, caked in sooty black charcoal dust.

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After a quick bite near the Keith Haring-decorated Wynwood Walls, Paris, LA headed back to Art Basel for “Instagram As an Artistic Medium”, a Digital Talk panel discussion featuring curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, artist Amalia Ulman, collector Simon de Pury, MoMA PS1 Director Klaus Biesenbach, and Instagram founder Kevin Systrom, moderated by ForYourArt founder Bettina Korek. After discussing each of their projects and how they involve Instagram, the panelists wondered how the format of a social media platform may be similar or different from past art.

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Biesenbach cited On Kawara and Yoko Ono as two artists who predicted the seriality and repetition of Twitter and Instagram, and said that Instagramming his bedroom window every day had seriously affected his sense of time and change. Korek argued that Instagram shouldn’t count as “art” because it isn’t trying to be art at all, but rather a kind of filtered documentation. Finally, the panelists wrapped up with a brief argument over the nature of authenticity: while Systrom stated that the freedom to choose a subject and frame it makes Instagram an authentic platform, Ulman wondered aloud whether preselected screens or filters subvert this presumed authenticity.

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Finally, after a brief break for drinks at Disaronno’s party at the Art Deco Gale Hotel, Paris, LA attended Ryan McNamara’s MEEM 4 Miami: A Story Ballet about the Internet, commissioned by Performa. There were truly no bad seats in the house as audience members were carted around by trained workers to various parts of the theater (and even a secret back room), where dancers performed for groups of 10-20 people at a time individually, in pairs, or triplets.

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Once the audience had fragmented, perspectives shifted constantly. It was difficult to determine when one’s seat position would change, as the lifts always picked up the theater’s chairs from behind. In all, the dancers performed feverishly for over an hour, ending in the balcony as the music collapsed into itself, with a disjointed mashup of pop hits.

Stay tuned tomorrow for Day 3 of Art Basel Miami Beach.

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH – DAY 1

This week, Paris, LA will be bringing you an exclusive look inside Art Basel, the world’s largest international art fair, which began today in Miami Beach and lasts until Sunday. In addition to the primary Art Basel fair, featuring 250 galleries from 31 countries as well as lecture and film series, more than ten independent art fairs take over the tropical beaches of South Florida and the museum spaces of metropolitan Miami.

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The week began with a press conference hosted by Director Marc Spiegler and Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine. The two introduced the fair’s sponsor, UBS Financial Services, and announced a number of revitalization initiatives in Miami, including the construction of a new convention center next year (to house future Art Basels) and the unveiling of a new Institute for Contemporary Art Miami, a controversial breakaway museum from Miami’s preexisting Museum of Contemporary Art.

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After the press conference, Paris, LA headed to the W Hotel South Beach for a private preview of a photographic series by Peter Lindberg, in conjunction with IWC Schaffhausen’s new watch collection. It wouldn’t be a major art fair without the inextricable collaboration of fine art, commercial advertising, and fashion. As the atmosphere and activity of Art Basel reveals, art is a commodity par excellence.

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At 11am, Art Basel Miami Beach officially threw open its doors to select collectors. The stalls were almost instantly swarming with eager collectors, though most fairgoers perused without significant scrutiny.

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Fondation Beyeler presented a collaborative performance by Marina Abramovic, part of the 14 Rooms series, which involved sleeping participants listening to soothing soundtracks while bundled on cots in a gallery. P.P.O.W. of New York presented a moving David Wonjarowicz retrospective, which displayed the artist’s multimedia sculptures and paintings next to his videos and photographs of the artist by friends Peter Hujar and Nan Goldin.

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Tornabuoni Art, Milan exhibited the light yellow drinking-straw wall sculptures of Francesca Pasquali next to deep blue and black paintings by iconic Italian artist Lucio Fontana. The booth was notably minimal in its primary color palette and white furniture to match its carpet and walls. Nearby, São Paolo’s Galeria Raquel Arnaud showed work by Carlos Zilio, influenced by quantum mechanics and metaphysical diagrams.

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Gladstone Gallery of New York and Brussels presented Cyprien Gaillard’s Cuban Wren, a massive steel excavator claw strung across with a bar of banded calcite, its iridescent mineral veins shining against the rusted machinery. The work recalled Gaillard’s work completed during his residency at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles last year, in which he used steel parts from Caterpillar excavators to mimic ancient sabertooths and refer to the constant construction in the Hammer’s neighborhood of Westwood. Gaillard’s was not the only work from the Hammer, as Los Angeles gallery Regen Projects exhibited site-specific work by Gabriel Kuri, sculptures that mimic the marble flooring of the museum’s second-floor smoking patio.

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Many galleries were awash with “blue chip” pieces. Marian Goodman Gallery of New York showed an impressive array: recent work by Jeff Wall, drawings and a video by William Kentridge, and mineral photographs by Tacita Dean. Next door, New York’s Cheim and Read showed a fleshy, pink Lynda Benglis wall sculpture and an unusually colorful Jenny Holzer ticker. London’s White Cube showed installations by Haim Steinbach, a lightbox by Alfredo Jaar, and documentation photographs of an early Marina Abramovic performance.

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After several hours of art viewing (tomorrow’s post will cover other Basel highlights), Paris, LA continued down Ocean Avenue to Untitled., the independent art far in a gleaming white tent on Miami Beach’s soft sandy shores. The crowd was much more casual and congenial. Several booths offered giveaway posters and tabloids, including Alfredo Jaar’s ingenious For Sale, Not For Sale (2014), a perfect addition to such a commercial setting.

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Zürcher Gallery of New York displayed calculators by Brian Belott that looked as if they had washed ashore, coated in barnacles and sandy pebbles. SIC, or Helsinki’s Initiatives for Individuality, displayed the detritus of a Monday night performance by Anastasia Ax: giant blocks of shredded paper, splattered with black paint, crumbling across the gallery floor. Ax has created “refugee camps” out of plaster and destroyed them in fits of rage, synced to live-performed noise music.

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Los Angeles had a definitive presence in the small fair. Culver City gallery Luis de Jesus showed Margie Livingston’s amusing (and ironically titled) Body of Work (2014) and a pair of beautiful digital prints by Kate Bonner. Veteran L.A. crafts artist Joel Otterson had a whimsical candelabra and ceramic vase exhibted in Maloney Fine Art’s booth.

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Stay tuned for Day 2 of Paris, LA’s trip to Art Basel Miami Beach.

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