Tag Archives: Marisa Berenson

HALSTON

Nearly thirty years after his death, Halston—the master of American minimalism and fashion’s greatest cautionary tale—has finally received a documentary worthy of his contributions. Unlike the designs of its subject, the film is somewhat padded with yards of unnecessary material. But this should not deter its intended audience from enjoying the ensemble.

Directed by Frédéric Tcheng—the filmmaker behind documentaries about Raf Simons (Dior and I) and Diana Vreeland (The Eye Has to Travel)—HALSTON hits an early peak when, one after another, his core house models—dismissively labeled “Halstonettes” by Loulou de la Falaise—testify to the talent of the man who could throw a bolt of fabric onto the showroom floor and, within minutes, create the basis of a couture gown:

“[Wearing a Halston dress imparted] elegance and ease. A sense of owning power without being masculine. And honoring the body you have.” — Alva Chinn

“You were free inside his clothes.” — Karen Bjornson

“He took away the cage. You didn’t really need the structure as much as you needed the woman. He really based most of his collections on us girls.” — Pat Cleveland

So where did it all go wrong? Cocaine and Studio 54 may have started the slide—and in the film, jewelry designer and Halston confidante Else Peretti gives a hilarious digression on mind-altering substances and their use:

“We worked all night… we didn’t get high… yes, we smoked, but no hard drugs… well, maybe a little coke…”

Because when you’re working all night…

But the man who introduced Halston to Studio 54, illustrator Joe Eula, traces the designer’s fall to the delusions of grandeur that set in after the move to the Olympic Tower studio, with its lofty, across-the-street view of St. Patrick’s spires.

The irascible, amphetamine-dependent fashion genius Charles James, who briefly worked with Halston Limited, was—typically—incendiary:

“Halston is a middle-of-the-road man who’d be better as a buyer in a store, or a stylist. He knows how to select good things to copy. But his passion is to put his name on it, for which action the word ‘plagiarism’ is correct.”

In the film, Fred Rottman, a workroom supervisor at Halston, is quick to deflect:

“Halston didn’t copy. He took concepts of Charles James’ and relaxed them.”

Halston’s era—the 1970s and early ’80s—was the time of out-of-control franchising. A designer sold his name to and sometimes designed for an array of manufacturers, slapping the cachet of his or her moniker on, yes, perfume and handbags, but also bedsheets, luggage, rugs, car interiors, and—in Halston’s case—uniforms for Braniff Airlines and the Girl Scouts of America.

This obsession to design everything for everyone, trading “class” for “mass,” led to the sale of his company to a conglomerate—a subject the film spends far too much time on. Suffice to say, Halston lost his judgment: How could he imagine that Bergdorf Goodman would want to carry a brand that was also hanging on the racks at J.C. Penney?

The film includes interviews with the designer’s friends Liza Minnelli, Bob Colacello, Marisa Berenson, Iman, Joel Schumacher, Naeem Khan, and his niece Lesley Frowick.

HALSTON

Through Thursday, June 6.

Nuart Theatre

11272 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

The director will participate in post-screening Q & A’s after the 7 pm shows on Friday and Saturday, May 31 and June 1.

On June 7, HALSTON will open at the Monica Film Center in Santa Monica, the Playhouse 7 in Pasadena, and the Town Center 5 in Encino.

From top: Halston at work in his Olympic Tower studio; Halston in the 1960s, photograph © Jean Barthet; the designer with Anjelica Huston—a frequent model for the house—and Liza Minnelli, photographs by Berry Berenson (2); U.S. poster; Halston in 1973 at 33 East 68th Street, New York City, photograph © estate of Charles Tracy. Images courtesy CNN Films and 1091 Media.

WARHOL WOMEN AT LÉVY GORVY

Forty-two paintings of women by Andy Warhol—including portraits of Gertrude Stein, Ethel Scull, Liza Minnelli, Dolly Parton, Golda Meir, Debbie Harry, Marilyn Monroe, and the artist’s mother Julia Warhola—are now on view at Lévy Gorvy in Manhattan.

In a silver-tin-foil-covered room in the gallery, a selection of Warhol’s 1964–1966 Screen Test shorts will play on a loop. Among the artist’s subjects for these 3-minute films were Yoko Ono, Edie Sedgwick, Marisa Berenson, Barbara Rubin, Amy Taubin, Susan Sontag, Niki de Saint Phalle, Cass Elliott, Donyale Luna, Holly Solomon, Maureen Tucker, and Nico.

“I don’t think I’ve ever met a collector today who is in between, let’s say, 25 to 65 [years old] who will tell me, ‘I won’t collect Warhol,’ and I don’t know that about any other artist… Our great-grandchildren will still be collecting Warhol more than many of the artists that are more pricey today.” — Dominique Lévy

WARHOL WOMEN

Through June 15.

Lévy Gorvy

909 Madison Avenue (at 73rd Street), New York City.

Andy Warhol, from top: Judy Garland (Multicolor), 1978, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas; Wilhelmina Ross, from the series Ladies and Gentlemen, circa 1974–1975; Triple Mona Lisa, 1964, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas; Kimiko Powers, 1972, acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas; Aretha Franklin, 1986, synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas; Red Jackie, 1964, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, photograph courtesy Froehlich Collection, Stuttgart. Images © 2019 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Paintings photographed by Tim Nighswander, courtesy Lévy Gorvy.

PARIS LA 16 — THE FASHION AND WRITING ISSUE — OUT NOW

The new print issue of PARIS LA—a tenth-anniversary special devoted to fashion and writing—is now available.

PARIS LA 16 includes interviews with Hilton Als, Chris KrausInes Kaag and Desiree Heiss of BlessTisa BryantFlorence MüllerMalik Gaines, Q.M. ZhangCommes des Garçons’ Adrian Joffe, Anelise Chen, and Bice Curiger and Jacqueline Burckhardt of Parkett.

Massimiliano Mocchia di Coggiola contributed an essay with artwork on dandyism, Ramon Hungerbühler and Fabian Marti talk about skate brands, there are pieces on Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, and Pierre Davis and No Sesso, Anne Dressen has written about contemporary jewelry…

… and portfolios and portraits by Cédric Rivrain, Cassi Namoda, David Benjamin Sherry, Wyatt KahnTobias Madison, Item IdemJean-François Lepage, Todd ColeMarie Angeletti, Will Benedict, and Katerina Jebb—who created the Michèle Lamy cover and a poster of Marisa Berenson—grace the issue.

Also: a reprint of Iris Marion Young’s landmark essay “Women Recovering Our Clothes.”

 

PARIS LA 16, published by DoPe Press.

Above: Inside covers, production PDF.

Below: Front and back covers, production PDF.

BARRY LYNDON

Image result for marisa berenson barry lyndon

Misunderstood in Great Britain and the States at the time of its release, BARRY LYNDON (1975) has always been appreciated by Europeans as a work of great beauty, director Stanley Kubrick’s journey into a Visconti-like wonderland.

In the film, Lord Bullingdon is played by Leon Vitali, who quit acting to become Kubrick’s right-hand man. Vitali is the subject of Tony Zierra’s new documentary FILMWORKER.

 

BARRY LYNDON, Saturday, May 19, at 11 am.

FILMWORKER, through May 24.

NUART THEATRE, 11272 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

landmarktheatres.com/barry-lyndon

landmarktheatres.com/nuart-theatre/filmworker

FILMWORKER, May 25 through May 31.

LAEMMLE PLAYHOUSE, 673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

LAEMMLE FINE ARTS, 8556 Wilshire Boulevard, Beverly Hills.

laemmle.com/film

See: dazeddigital.com/why-barry-lyndon-is-stanley-kubricks-masterpiece

Above: Ryan O’Neal and Marisa Berenson in Barry Lyndon.

Below: Berenson.

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