Tag Archives: Matthew Marks

VIJA CELMINS IN CONVERSATION

In conjunction with her Met Breuer retrospective, Vija Celmins will join curator Ian Alteveer for a public conversation at the Met Fifth Avenue.

AN EVENING WITH VIJA CELMINS

Thursday, October 10, at 6:30 pm.

Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Metropolitan Museum of Art

1000 Fifth Avenue (83rd Street entrance), New York City.

Vija Celmins, from top: the artist at Gemini G.E.L. in Los Angeles, 2002, photograph courtesy and © Sidney B. Felsen; To Fix the Image in Memory, 1977–1982, stones and painted bronze, eleven pairs; Night Sky #15, 2000–2001, oil on canvas; Japanese Book, 2007–2010, oil on canvas; Heater, 1964, oil on canvas; Shell, 2009–2010, oil on canvas; Suspended Plane, 1966, oil on canvas; Vase, oil on canvas; Lamp #1, 1964, oil on canvas; Untitled (Ocean), 1977, graphite on acrylic ground on paper. Images courtesy and © Vija Celmins and Matthew Marks Gallery.

FELIX AND FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

Sales are good, tickets are selling out, events are full, and the sun is shining—although a brief shower is forecast for midday Sunday—so the inaugural edition of Frieze Los Angeles should be followed by many more.

We hope Felix returns, too. Co-founded by Morán Morán brothers Al and Mills and collector Dean Valentine, it’s an intimate fair headquartered in Hollywood.

FELIX

Through Sunday, February 17.

Hollywood Roosevelt

7000 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

An Arthur Jafa edition of Name That Tune has been added to today’s Frieze Talks, and the fair will close on Sunday with Miranda July and Maggie Nelson in conversation.

When you’re out on the Paramount studio backlot in the Frieze Projects section, stop by the Sqirl/Acid-Free space for Sqirl Away to-go items from the Los Feliz restaurant as well as a selection of art books and periodicals, including Liz Craft’s …my life in the sunshine—published by DoPe Press—and the new print issue of PARIS LA.

FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

Through Sunday, February 17.

Paramount Pictures Studios

5515 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles.

From top: Ken Price, Return to LA, 1990, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks (Frieze Los Angeles); Florian Morlat, collage, courtesy of the artist and The Pit (Frieze Los Angeles); Jessi Reaves installation at Felix, courtesy the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York; Kristen Morgin, Jennifer Aniston’s Used Book Sale (detail), ceramic, courtesy the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art (Felix); David Hockney, Peter Showering, 1976, C print, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks (Frieze Los Angeles); Nan Goldin, Blue, 2016, courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman (Frieze Los Angeles).

RETURN OF THE HAIRY WHO

“Neither a movement nor a style, Hairy Who was simply the name six Chicago artists chose when they decided that the best way to find success as individuals was to join forces and exhibit together.

“In 1966, Jim Falconer, Art Green, Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, Suellen Rocca, and Karl Wirsum—all recent graduates of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago—began mounting, as the Hairy Who, unconventional displays of bright, bold graphic work at the Hyde Park Art Center. Over a period of four years, they transformed the art landscape of Chicago, injecting their new and unique voices into the city’s rising national and international profile.”*

The first comprehensive Hairy Who exhibition is now on view at the Art Institute.

HAIRY WHO? 1966–1969*

Through January 6.

Art Institute, 111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago.

From top:

Gladys Nilsson, The Trogens, 1967, Art Institute of Chicago, © Gladys Nilsson.

Art GreenConsider the Options, Examine the Facts, Apply the Logic (originally titled The Undeniable Logician), 1965, Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, © Art Green.

Dan Nadel, The Collected Hairy Who Publications, 1966–1969 (New York: Matthew Marks, 2015); image credit: Matthew Marks.

Below: Suellen RoccaBare Shouldered Beauty and the Pink Creature (detail), 1965, Art Institute of Chicago © Suellen Rocca.

POSITIONER

POSITIONER—a new group show at Matthew Marks featuring work by Lena Henke, Ravi Jackson, Julien Nguyen, Julia Phillips, and Paul Mpagi Sepuya focused on the depiction of the individual—is now on view.

“Representation, figuration, and portraiture all carry with them implications of power, visibility, and identity. The artists in this exhibition, working in a broad range of media, expand upon and push against these histories, suggesting more inclusive and critically-engaged ways forward.”*

“The title of the exhibition is borrowed from Phillips, whose work often alludes to the unseen nature of institutionalized discrimination.”*

POSITIONER*

Through December 22.

Matthew Marks

1062 North Orange Grove, and

7818 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Hollywood.

See “Death Deluxe,” a portfolio by Item Idem, with photographs by Brian Oldham and Paul Mpagi Sepuya, PARIS LA 16 (2018).

Julia PhillipsFixator (#2), 2017; partially glazed ceramic, screws, metal structure, and partially glazed ceramic tiles.

Ravi JacksonUntitled, 2017; acrylic on paper and wood, ceramic tile, and Formica

Julien NguyenCapricorn Rising, 2018; oil and tempera on wood panel.

Lena HenkeDie Kommenden II, 2018; rubber, foam, pigment, reclaimed wood, metal, and mesh.

Paul Mpagi SepuyaDarkroom Mirror (_2100135), 2017; archival pigment print.

Images courtesy the artists and Matthew Marks.

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAY 4: REFLECTIONS ON DEPARTURE

Paris, LA’s final day at Art Basel was spent perusing missed booths at the Miami Beach Convention Center’s main fair, and soaking up the last few rays of sunshine on the beach. There was perhaps no better way to bookend a whirlwind tour of art and culture on both sides of Biscayne Bay, stretching into late night and early morning parties.

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The Saturday and Sunday crowd was noticeably more casual than at Wednesday’s VIP preview, and a number of works had been replaced with others, having been bought off the wall by collectors earlier in the week. Still, a number of standouts remained. Katharina Fritsch’s bright orange Octopus drew viewers into Matthew Marks’s booth, where a stunning new Ellsworth Kelly aluminum wall sculpture was displayed near polyurethane objects by Fischli/Weiss and a photograph by Thomas Demand. Luhring Augustine displayed one of Rachel Whitread’s Untitled (Stories) sculptures, a cast of the negative space around books on a shelf, which the artist later used in her poetic Vienna Holocaust Memorial.

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Some works humorously reappeared, referenced by other artists. Doug Aitken’s Exit (Large), on display in Regen Projects’ booth, appeared in an Eric Fischl painting not far away. Jeff Koons’s Balloon Rabbit appeared suspended upside down from a totem pole in a Jason Rhodes sculpture, on display at David Zwirner’s Basel booth.

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Fergus McCaffrey presented a colorful survey of Jack Early works, particularly homoerotic paintings of crotch close-ups on children’s wallpaper, featuring cheerful hand-holding soldiers. A canary yellow phonograph in the center of the gallery played Early’s “Biography in 20 Minutes”, recounting how the artist chose the wallpaper for his first bedroom, further referencing his memories of queer childhood and early budding sexuality. Another arresting survey show was Alison Knowles’s The Boat Book, sponsored by James Fuentes of New York. A series of wooden frames painted and draped in silkscreens, prints, photographs and maritime diagrams, The Boat Book looks like an unfolded large-scale scrapbook, memorializing the artist’s fisherman brother.

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Urs Fischer’s Small Rain drew curious crowds to the Sadie Coles HQ, London booth. Nearby Galerie Buchholz’s booth featured a stunning mechanistic sculpture by newcomer Simon Denny, with the familiar Snapchat ghost logo embedded like a 3D phantom in a plastic cube atop a computer server. Artist Sean Raspet also drew crowds to Société gallery’s booth in the Nova section with a wall of plastic tanks filled with a manufactured green polyether substance.

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Hauser & Wirth exhibited an impressive new teardrop-shaped sculpture by Mark Bradford. Other fair favorites included Jose Dávila, whose marble and glass slabs precariously pitched outward on colorful red and orange straps were shown at a half dozen galleries from Latin America, Europe, and the United States. Sherrie Levine’s minimalist objects in glass cases were scattered all over the winding Basel booths.

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At the booth for famed editions workshop and gallery Gemini G.E.L., new works by Richard Serra, Julie Mehretu, and Sophie Calle were on display. Serra’s monochromatic black Rift series was partly inspired by rubbings of asphalt textures in the Gemini parking lot. Mehretu’s Myriads, Only By Dark, composed of many layers of finely colored inks and intricately textured gestures in black, took over a year to complete. Calle’s work, In Memory of Frank Gehry’s Flowers, featured a collage cut-out of dried flowers given to the artist by her friend, architect Frank Gehry, in honor of her exhibition openings, alongside photographs of the flowers when fresh and a vase of real roses designed by Gehry himself.

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Between 250 galleries at Art Basel alone, 10 independent art fairs, and countless events, parties, exhibition openings, performances, and lectures, it was truly impossible to see it all here in Miami this week. Some important lessons were learned: few people come to Miami Beach in early December to view artwork. Perusing the fairs is like speed-dating high culture–there simply isn’t time to stop and study. As the fashion and music industries have teamed up with Art Basel, many more have arrived just for the parties, and parties they find: many of them last late into the night and well past sunrise. And as Art Basel has grown, so has Miami, sprouting gleaming new residential skyscrapers (including the new Zaha Hadid 10 Museum Park) that crowd out the two-lane boulevards and classic white Art Deco hotels.

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If you plan on attending Art Basel Miami Beach next year, don’t forget to pack good walking shoes, your favorite hangover cure, and a well-planned schedule. With the right preparation, you won’t find a better way to spend the first days of winter.