Tag Archives: MOCA Grand Avenue

CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN — BREAKING THE FRAME

Join filmmaker Marielle Nitoslawskal for the Los Angeles premiere of her Carolee Schneemann documentary BREAKING THE FRAME.

Presented by the Los Angeles Filmforum at MOCA, BREAKING THE FRAME—shot in 35mm, 16, Super 8, and HD video over the course of six years—is a “kinetic, hyper-­cinematic intervention, a critical meditation on the relation of art to the physical, domestic and conceptual aspects of daily life and on the attributes of memory. It uses Schneemann’s autobiographical materials to narrate the historic upheaval within Western art in post-­war America.”*

BREAKING THE FRAME

Thursday, July 25, at 7 pm.

MOCA Grand

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Marielle Nitoslawska, Breaking the Frame (2012), stills. Images courtesy and the filmmaker and Possible Movements.

OUTFEST 2019 — BARBARA HAMMER

TENDER FICTIONS—the late, great Barbara Hammer’s follow-up to Nitrate Kisses—traces the filmmaker’s evolution from would-be child-star of the fifties to heterosexual “earth mother” of the sixties to the lesbian artist and activist of her last decades.

As part of The Legacy Project—a partnership between OUTFEST and UCLATENDER FICTIONS (1996) will screen this weekend as part of the festival.

TENDER FICTIONS

Sunday, July 21, at noon.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

See A. L. Steiner on Hammer.

From top: Barbara Hammer, Tender Fictions; Barbara Hammer, On the Road, Big Sur, California, 1975, 2017, gelatin silver print; Barbara Hammer, Sappho Production Meeting, Los Angeles, 1978; Hammer. Images courtesy and © the artist’s estate.

K8 HARDY’S OUTFITUMENTARY

“A record of the way a young lesbian feminist dressed in her coming of age” — K8 Hardy

K8 Hardy’s directorial debut OUTFITUMENTARY (2016) will screen this week as part of the Jason Simon series Blame the Audience at MOCA.

Also on the bill: If Andy Warhol’s Super-8 Camera Could Talk, directed by Roddy Bogawa, and Tiger Morse, directed by Warhol.

OUTFITUMENTARY

Thursday, March 7, at 6 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: K8 Hardy, Outfitumentary, still; Andy Warhol, Tiger Morse, aka Tiger Morse (Reel 14 of ****), still; K8 Hardy, How To: Untitled Runway Show book cover, published by DoPe Press in 2013, cover design by Madame Paris.

JORDAN CASTEEL

Jordan Casteel—two of whose paintings are part of ONE DAY AT A TIME at MOCA—will discuss the exhibition at the museum during a public tour this weekend.

And Casteel’s museum show RETURNING THE GAZE will open in Denver next month.

JORDAN CASTEEL ON ONE DAY AT A TIME—MANNY FARBER AND TERMITE ART

Sunday, January 20, at 3 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

JORDAN CASTEEL—RETURNING THE GAZE

February 2 through August 18.

Denver Art Museum

100 West 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver.

From top: Jordan CasteelYahya, 2014, oil on canvas, collection of Jim and Julie Taylor, image courtesy Sargent’s Daughters, New York.; Jordan Casteel, Memorial, 2017, oil on canvas, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, image courtesy the artist and MOCAJordan CasteelBenyam, 2018, oil on canvas, Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg Collection, image courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York; Jordan Casteel, Glass Man Michael, 2016, oil on canvas, collection of John L. Thomson, Minneapolis, image courtesy the artist and MOCA. All images © Jordan Casteel.

HELEN MOLESWORTH AND JONATHAN LETHEM IN CONVERSATION

“I try to take the long view. I think that every epoch has had its fantastical producers. I’m really interested in Manny Farber right now. He had two classifications for art: white elephant art—this huge thing, Stella, Koons, Canova, Cabanel—and termite art: Manet, Moyra Davey.

“I try to be sanguine about that quality of what’s possible with art. I do think art used to have a fantasy that it was separate from life, and we know now that it’s not.” — Helen Molesworth, PARIS LA 14  (2016)

“[White Elephant] was a term for work that made large claims of importance and was therefore burdened with all kinds of ungraceful exposition and prescriptive social thinking, as opposed to something like film noir—which is Termite Art—stuff that just burrowed into experience and ended up saying quite a lot more about American life and which Farber believed was more mysterious and lively and compressed and radiated more meaning because it didn’t bother trying to be important…

“I loved the termite position before I was old enough to have any self-conscious thoughts about what it meant.” — Jonathan Lethem, LARB, 2016

Molesworth—curator of ONE DAY AT A TIME—MANNY FARBER AND TERMITE ART, now at MOCA—will join Lethem this week to talk about Farber and his “notion of termite art—an exploration of the problems and pleasures of the everyday—as it appears within fine art, cinema, writing, and life.”*

 

HELEN MOLESWORTH IN CONVERSATION WITH JONATHAN LETHEM*

Thursday, October 18, at 7 pm.

 

ONE DAY AT A TIME—MANNY FARBER AND TERMITE ART

Through March 11.

MOCA Grand Avenue, 250 Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

 

See Farber on Film: The Complete Film Writings of Manny Farber, ed. Robert Polito (New York: Library of America, 2009).

Lethem is a contributor to Termite Deluxe: Manny Farber Writings and Paintings, a forthcoming volume exploring Farber’s life and work.

Top: Manny Farber, undated photograph, courtesy Patricia Patterson.

Above: Manny FarberStory of the Eye (detail), 1985; oil, graphite and masking tape on board. Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego.

Below: Manny Farber, Domestic Movies, 1985; oil on board. ResMed collection, San Diego.

Image credit: Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.