Tag Archives: MOCA

CONSTANCE MALLINSON IN CONVERSATION

The rise of the feminist movement and the globalism that exposed United States audiences to other cultures were two energizing forces for artist Constance Mallinson, coinciding with the artist’s late-1970s move to Los Angeles. Mallinson worked downtown, creating paintings and drawings that channeled the form and logic of weaving. She focused her attention on employing pattern as a bridge between minimalist aesthetics and a more personal and feminine approach as part of the Pattern and Decoration art movement.

Mallinson joins MOCA assistant curator Rebecca Lowery in a conversation about her practice then, now, and in the context of the exhibition WITH PLEASURE—PATTERN AND DECORATION IN AMERICAN ART 1972–1985.*

CONSTANCE MALLINSON and REBECCA LOWERY IN CONVERSATION*

Thursday, January 23, at 7 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Constance Mallinson, artworks courtesy and © the artist, Jason Vass Gallery, and Edward Cella Art and Architecture. Photograph of Mallinson by Todd Gray, courtesy and © the photographer and Mallinson.

NOAH DAVIS

Noah Davis (1983–2015) was a figurative painter and cofounder of the Underground Museum (UM) in Los Angeles. Despite his untimely death at the age of thirty-two, Davis’ paintings are a crucial part of the rise of figurative and representational painting in the first two decades of the twenty-first century.

Loneliness and tenderness suffuse his rigorously composed paintings, as do traces of his abiding interest in artists such as Marlene Dumas, Kerry James Marshall, Fairfield Porter, [Mark Rothko], and Luc Tuymans. Davis’ pictures can be slightly deceptive; they are modest in scale yet emotionally ambitious. Using a notably dry paint application and a moody palette of blues, purples, and greens, his work falls into two loose categories: There are scenes from everyday life, such as a portrait of his young son, a soldier returning from war, or a housing project designed by famed modernist architect Paul Williams. And there are paintings that traffic in magical realism, surreal images that depict the world both seen and unseen, where the presence of ancestors, ghosts, and fantasy are everywhere apparent.

Generous, curious, and energetic, Davis founded—along with his wife, the sculptor Karon Davis—the Underground Museum, an artist- and family-run space for art and culture in Los Angeles. The UM began modestly—Noah and Karon worked to join three storefronts in the city’s Arlington Heights neighborhood. Davis’ dream was to exhibit “museum-quality” art in a working-class black and Latino neighborhood. In the early days of the UM, Davis was unable to secure museum loans, so he organized exhibitions of his work alongside that of his friends and family, and word of mouth spread about Davis’ unique curatorial gestures.

In 2014 Davis began organizing exhibitions using works selected from the MOCA Los Angeles’ collection as his starting point. In the aftermath of Davis’ passing, the team of family and friends he gathered continued his work at the UM, transforming it into one of the liveliest and most important gathering places in Los Angeles for artists, filmmakers, musicians, writers, and activists. — Helen Molesworth

The exhibition NOAH DAVIS—curated by Molesworth—is now on view at David Zwirner in New York. An iteration of the show will open at the Underground Museum in Los Angeles in March 2020.

A new Davis monograph—featuring an introduction by Molesworth and oral history interviews that she conducted with Davis’ friends, family, and colleagues—is forthcoming.

NOAH DAVIS

Through February 22.

David Zwirner

525 and 533 West 19th Street, New York City.

Noah Davis, Noah Davis, David Zwirner, January 16–February 22, 2020, from top: 1975 (8), 2013, oil on canvas in artist’s frame; LA Nights, 2008, oil on wood panel; Pueblo del Rio: Arabesque, 2014, oil on canvas; Single Mother with Father Out of the Picture, 2007–2008, oil, acrylic, and graphite on canvas; Black Widow, 2007, acrylic and gouache on canvas; The Waiting Room, 2008, oil and acrylic on canvas; Painting for My Dad, 2011, oil on canvas; Untitled (Birch Trees), 2010, oil on canvas; Carlos’ World, 2014–2015, oil on canvas; Leni Riefenstahl, 2010, oil on canvas; Man with Alien and Shotgun, 2008, oil and acrylic on canvas; Noah Davis in Los Angeles, 2009 (detail), photograph by Patrick O’Brien-Smith; The Last Barbeque, 2008, oil on canvas; The Summer House, 2010, oil on canvas; Pueblo del Rio: Concerto, 2014, oil on canvas; Untitled, 2015, oil on canvas; Imaginary Enemy, 2009, oil on wood panel. Images courtesy and © the Estate of Noah Davis, the photographers, and David Zwirner; quote courtesy and © Helen Molesworth and David Zwirner.

GODARD ENCORE AT THE AERO

A sequel of sorts to the recent American Cinematheque series For the Love of Godard arrives this weekend at the Aero.

CONTEMPT (Le Mépris) and ALPHAVILLE will screen, as well as 35mm prints of LE PETIT SOLDAT and MADE IN U.S.A.Anna Karina’s last film for Jean-Luc Godard, featuring a cameo by Marianne Faithfull.

And if you missed last year’s MOCA screening of ONE PLUS ONE—Godard’s documentary incorporating the Rolling Stone’s “Sympathy for the Devil” recording sessions—it will be at the Aero Sunday night.

(The Cinematheque’s exclusive run of Godard’s new film THE IMAGE BOOKLe livre d’imagecommences Friday, February 15.)

CONTEMPT and LE PETIT SOLDAT

Friday, January 18, at 7:30 pm.

ALPHAVILLE and MADE IN U.S.A.

Saturday, January 19, at 7:30

ONE PLUS ONE

Sunday, January 20, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Brigitte Bardot and Michel Piccoli in Contempt (1963); Piccoli(left), Fritz Lang, Jack Palance, and Jean-Luc Godard, on the set of ContemptAnna Karina in Alphaville (1965). Image credit: Rialto Pictures.

CHRIS EMILE’S FIXED

Chris Emile—dancer, choreographer, and cofounder of No)one Art House—presents a choreographed performance in response to Haegue Yang’s Strange Fruit (2012-13).  

Using Yang’s installation as its stage, the performance by Emile and three other dancers examines the “public display and consumption of violence against marginalized bodies and investigates how African-Americans process trauma.”*

 

FIXED, Sunday, September 2, at 3pm

MOCA GRAND AVENUE, 250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

moca.org/fixed-chris-emile

Chris Emile, Fixed. Image courtesy the artist and MOCA.

POLLOCK CONSERVATION AT MOCA

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In collaboration with the Getty Conservation Institute, MOCA has been conducting – in public – a conservation of Jackson Pollock’s abstract expressionist painting NUMBER 1, 1949 (1949), part of the collection since 1989.

“On select dates, the conservator will perform the conservation treatment during open hours, answering questions from the public about the protocols and processes of modern art conservation. Three works by Pollock from MOCA’s permanent collection, dating from 1943 to 1951, will also be on view, exemplifying a range of materials from watercolor to collage.”*

Independent conservator Chris Stavroudis will be working in-gallery on the treatment of Pollock’s NUMBER 1, 1949 (1949) on Thursdays in April and May, and will be available for Q&A sessions from 11:30 am to noon and from 5:30 to 6:00 pm.

 

CHRIS STAVROUDIS – JACKSON POLLOCK’S NUMBER 1, 1949: A CONSERVATION TREATMENT, Thursdays, April 19, April 26, May 10, May 17, and May 24.

MOCA GRAND AVENUE, 250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

moca.org/jackson-pollock-conservation-treatment

 

Above: Chris Stavroudis at work at MOCA. Installation view photograph by Brian Forrest. Image credit: MOCA.

Below: Jackson PollockNumber 1, 1949, 1949, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, 63 x 102 1/2 in. (160.02 x 260.35 cm), The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Rita and Taft Schreiber Collection, © 2017 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Jackson Pollock, Number 1, 1949

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