Tag Archives: MOMA

PETER EMMANUEL GOLDMAN — ROUE DE CENDRES

An extraordinary black-and-white film shot in Paris in 1968, ROUE DE CENDRES / WHEEL OF ASHES is a film that haunts you long after you have left the cinema. Peter Emmanuel Goldman is really a forgotten American genius. — Henri Sera, Theiapolis Cinema

Pierre Clémenti is sensational. He’s not acting: he’s living his part. Diaphanous, plagued by an inner fire, his cheeks hollow, he is in close communion with the filmmaker and his quest. Just as in ECHOES OF SILENCE, Goldman’s vision brings us beyond the image into a world of palpitations and callings. — Jean-Louis Bory, 1971, Le Nouvel Observateur

ROUE DE CENDRES / WHEEL OF ASHES

Friday, November 15, at 8 pm.

Tuesday, November 19, at 4:30 pm.

Museum of Modern Art

Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Peter Emmanuel Goldman, Roue de cendres / Wheel of Ashes; Pierre Clémenti and Katinka Bo. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker and the actors.

MORRIS ENGEL — I NEED A RIDE TO CALIFORNIA

Morris Engel’s unreleased film I NEED A RIDE TO CALIFORNIA—which he started filming in 1968—will screen this week at MOMA, followed by a conversation with Anne Morra, Mary Engel—director of Orkin/Engel Film and Photo Archive—and Jake Perlin, artistic and programming director at the Metrograph.

Inspired by day-glo psychedelia, societal upheaval, and sexual liberation, Engel crafts the story of Lilly, a naïve, lonely young Californian who finds herself in New York City. Lilly embraces the flower child movement, right down to the bare feet and a ring of daisies in her blond hair. But the city, and Lilly’s circle of acquaintances, are not as compassionate as she hoped they would be. I NEED A RIDE TO CALIFORNIA is a complex, sometimes raw portrait of the era, with Lilly as a fragile voyager in Greenwich Village’s tempestuous counter culture scene. While Engel’s prior feature films explored idyllic, nostalgic moments shared by children, I NEED A RIDE TO CALIFORNIA marks his mature aesthetic engagement with the unsettled social and political landscape of American in the late 1960s.*

I NEED A RIDE TO CALIFORNIA*

Wednesday, October 23, at 7 pm.

Museum of Modern Art

Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Morris Engel, I Need a Ride to California (1968). Images courtesy and © the Orkin/Engel Film and Photo Archive.

JOHN AKOMFRAH — PURPLE

John Akomfrah—whose three-chanel video installation about Stuart Hall, The Unfinished Conversation, created a sensation at MOMA in 2017—presents PURPLE, a new six-channel work on climate change.

“Symphonic in scale and divided into five interwoven movements, the film features various disappearing ecological landscapes, from the hinterlands of Alaska and the desolate environments of Greenland to the Tahitian Peninsula and the volcanic Marquesas Islands in the South Pacific…

PURPLE conveys the complex and fragile interrelation of human and non-human life with a sense of poetic gravity that registers the vulnerability of living in precarious environments.”*

JOHN AKOMFRAH—PURPLE*

Through September 2.

Institute of Contemporary Art

25 Harbor Shore Drive, Boston.

John Akomfrah, Purple, 2018, stills and installation view. Film images courtesy and © the artist, installation image courtesy Thyssen-Bornemisza Museo Nacional.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

The paintings of Ben Shahn, Antonio Berni, Raquel Forner, Honoré Sharrer, and Pavel Tchelitchew, the photography of Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, the sculpture of Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, the ballet costumes of Kurt Seligmann, Paul Cadmus, and Jared French, the music of Virgil Thomson, and the philosophy of George Gurdjieff

… all come together in LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN, the Museum of Modern Art exhibition devoted to the writer, critic, curator, patron, and impresario who set the aesthetic template for MOMA and brought George Balanchine to America to establish the New York City Ballet.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

Through June 15.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

This summer MOMA‘s West 53rd Street location will close for four months—June 15 through October 21—for reconstruction.

From top: George Platt LynesLincoln Kirstein, circa 1948, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes; Paul Cadmus, set design for the ballet Filling Station, 1937, cut-and-pasted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Lincoln Kirstein, 1941, © 2018 estate of Paul Cadmus; Walker EvansRoadside View, Alabama Coal Area Town, 1936, gelatin silver print, printed circa 1969 by Charles RodemeyerMuseum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the artist, © 2019 Walker Evans Archive, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Paul CadmusBallet Positions, drawing for the primer Ballet Alphabet, 1939, ink, pencil, colored ink, and gouache on paper (letters reversed on drawing), Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein, © 2019 estate of Paul Cadmus; Pavel TchelitchewHide-and-Seek. 1940–42, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Harvard Society for Contemporary Art pamphlet. 1931–32, Harvard Society for Contemporary Art scrapbooks, vol. 2 (Autumn 1930–33), Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York; Ben ShahnBartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco, 1931–32, gouache on paper on board, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of Ben Shahn / VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Pavel Tchelitchew, study for a backdrop for the ballet Apollon Musagète, 1942, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein; George Platt LynesLew Christensen in Apollon Musagète, June 24, 1937, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes.


CHANTAL AKERMAN — HISTOIRES D’AMÉRIQUE

Chantal Akerman’s HISTOIRES D’AMÉRIQUES—FOOD, FAMILY AND PHILOSOPHY has been restored by the Royal Cinematheque of Belgium, and will screen once this week at MOMA.

Featuring Living Theatre founder Judith Malina, and Stranger in Paradise star Eszter Balint and her father Stephan, the film looks at Jewish history and identity on the Lower East Side.

HISTOIRES D’AMÉRIQUES—FOOD, FAMILY AND PHILOSOPHY

Tuesday, January 29, at 1:30 pm.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

From top: Chantal Akerman; scene from Histoires d’Amérique (1989).