Tag Archives: Moran Moran

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF—a group show of women artists at Morán Morán, curated by Eve Fowler—is on view for one more week.

This highly recommended exhibition includes the work of Etel Adnan, Frances Barth, Donna Dennis, Florence Derive, Simone Fattal, Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Barbara Hammer, Harmony Hammond, Maren Hassinger, Suzanne Jackson, Virginia Jaramillo, Harriet Korman, Joyce Kozloff, Magali Lara, Mary Lum, Mónica Mayer, Dona Nelson, Senga Nengudi, Howardena Pindell, and Joan Semmel.

“The title of the show is from a Gertrude Stein text that Fowler selected for its ambiguous poetry that she felt honored the artists.”

I’m not asking the artists to tell me anything, but they allowed me in their studios—a private place where artists often feel vulnerable. — Eve Fowler*

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF*

Through August 24.

Morán Morán

937 North La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Please Recall to Me Everything You Have Thought Of, curated by Eve Fowler, Morán Morán, 2019, from top: Howardena Pindell, Untitled #51, 2010, mixed media on board, courtesy Garth Greenan Gallery; Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Untitled, 1972, glazed stoneware; Senga Nengudi, Rapunzel, 1981, silver gelatin print; Suzanne Jackson, finding joy in the mirror, 2016, acrylic, wood veneer, Bogus paper, loquat seeds, courtesy of O-Town House; Donna Dennis installation view; Florence Derive, Blue Manuscript, 2017, oil on raw linen; Maren Hassinger, Whole Cloth, 2017, photograph on fabric; Barbara Hammer, South Fork Yuba River, California, 1973, 2017, silver gelatin print, courtesy of Company Gallery; Barbara Hammer, Dyketactics, 1974, 16mm film transferred to video with sound; Harmony Hammond, Aperture #6, 2013, monotype on paper, courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates; Simone Fattal, Woman as Tree (1), 2010, porcelain, courtesy of Kaufmann Repetto; Frances Barth, A Tiny Pinch, 2017, acrylic on gessoed wood panel; Joan Semmel, Untitled, 2016, oil crayon on paper, courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates; Dona Nelson, Luka, 2015, acrylic and mixed media on canvas, courtesy of Michael Benevento; Etel Adnan, Mount Tamalpais, 2013, ink on handmade paper (2), courtesy of Callicoon Fine Arts; Mary Lum, Informations Practiques, 2019, acrylic on paper; Virginia Jaramillo, Visual Theorems 15, 1979, linen fiber with hand-ground earth pigments, courtesy of Hales Gallery; Harriet Korman, Untitled, 2016–18, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artists and Morán Morán.

JACOLBY SATTERWHITE AND LEGACY RUSSELL

As part of the Frieze Art and Fashion Summit in New York, Jacolby Satterwhite will join Studio Museum associate curator Legacy Russell for “Self and Subjectivity—Breaking the Confines of Identity,” a discussion about Satterwhite’s focus on “power, politics, and a dystopian future.”* 

JACOLBY SATTERWHITE and LEGACY RUSSELL

FRIEZE ART AND FASHION SUMMIT

Tuesday, April 30, at 10:20 am.

The New School, Parsons

Tishman Auditorium

63 Fifth Avenue, New York City.

From top: Jacolby Satterwhite, photograph by Frank Sun, courtesy the artist, the photographer, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Jacolby Satterwhite, En Plein Air: Abduction I, 2014, courtesy of the artist and Morán Morán; Legacy Russell, photograph by Daniel Dorsa, courtesy of the writer and the photographer.

FELIX AND FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

Sales are good, tickets are selling out, events are full, and the sun is shining—although a brief shower is forecast for midday Sunday—so the inaugural edition of Frieze Los Angeles should be followed by many more.

We hope Felix returns, too. Co-founded by Morán Morán brothers Al and Mills and collector Dean Valentine, it’s an intimate fair headquartered in Hollywood.

FELIX

Through Sunday, February 17.

Hollywood Roosevelt

7000 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

An Arthur Jafa edition of Name That Tune has been added to today’s Frieze Talks, and the fair will close on Sunday with Miranda July and Maggie Nelson in conversation.

When you’re out on the Paramount studio backlot in the Frieze Projects section, stop by the Sqirl/Acid-Free space for Sqirl Away to-go items from the Los Feliz restaurant as well as a selection of art books and periodicals, including Liz Craft’s …my life in the sunshine—published by DoPe Press—and the new print issue of PARIS LA.

FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

Through Sunday, February 17.

Paramount Pictures Studios

5515 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles.

From top: Ken Price, Return to LA, 1990, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks (Frieze Los Angeles); Florian Morlat, collage, courtesy of the artist and The Pit (Frieze Los Angeles); Jessi Reaves installation at Felix, courtesy the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York; Kristen Morgin, Jennifer Aniston’s Used Book Sale (detail), ceramic, courtesy the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art (Felix); David Hockney, Peter Showering, 1976, C print, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks (Frieze Los Angeles); Nan Goldin, Blue, 2016, courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman (Frieze Los Angeles).

DAVID BENJAMIN SHERRY — MONUMENTS

DAVID BENJAMIN SHERRY—MONUMENTS is now on view at Móran Móran.

And see our selection from the show in PARIS LA 16.

DAVID BENJAMIN SHERRY—MONUMENTS

Through October 27.

Móran Móran, 937 North La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Top: David Benjamin SherryRio Grande del Norte National Monument, New Mexico, 2018.

Monuments installation views and artwork courtesy of the artist and Móran Móran.

TERENCE KOH

“[I] value passive-aggressive art, which is sometimes a fag limbo strategy: pretending passivity, pretending not to fight for ones place at the table, this art may meanwhile house rebarbative aggressions.” — Wayne Koestenbaum, 2004 Whitney Biennial catalogue*

Things in the new Terence Koh exhibit SLEEPING IN A BEAM OF SUNLIGHT (Moran Moran) are different now than they were when the show opened, and may change again during its final week. Cushions have been scattered, plants have grown, books have been read, the resident cat made quick work of a stuffed canary, and the news on the radio dangling from the ceiling has gone from bad to worse. Terence himself may have lost or gained weight, depending on the food that visitors to the gallery have brought for him—his only sustenance. Terence has gone back to the land in the form of a lived-in gallery installation, and all the inhabitants—Terence, his cat, the bees in the hive in the garden on the roof—are, for the duration, doing their thing. It’s immersive, it’s compost, it’s regenerative, and it’s home. Check it out.

 

TERENCE KOH: SLEEPING IN A BEAM OF SUNLIGHT, through March 11, 2017.

MORAN MORAN, 937 N. LaCienega Blvd., Los Angeles.

moranmorangallery.com/exhibits

Two weeks later, Terence returns to Moran Moran for a group show, an “exhibition associating artworks that are evocative of a desire to create parity and connectedness with the natural world….These artists do not endeavor to generate homages to ecology, or directly reference an environmentalist agenda; rather, the work contends with our origins—a human’s nature.”**

 

WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS (TERENCE KOH, DENNIS OPPENHEIM, VIRGINIA OVERTON, and NICK VAN WOERT), March 25 through May 13, 2017.

MORAN MORAN, 937 N. LaCienega Blvd., Los Angeles.

** moranmorangallery.com/where-the-sidewalk-ends

* Wayne Koestenbaum, “Fag Limbo,” in My 1980s & Other Essays (New York: Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, 2013). According to Koestenbaum, this essay was “partly inspired” by the work of Terence Koh and other artists who participated in the 2004 Whitney Biennial, and was originally published in its exhibition catalogue.

Terence Koh, from the documentary The Future of Art (directed by Erik Niedling and Ingo Niermann). Photograph by Christian Görmer Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Terence Koh, from the documentary The Future of Art (2010), directed by Erik Niedling and Ingo Niermann.
Photograph by Christian Görmer
Wikimedia Commons