Tag Archives: Museum of Contemporary Art LA

CONSTANCE MALLINSON IN CONVERSATION

The rise of the feminist movement and the globalism that exposed United States audiences to other cultures were two energizing forces for artist Constance Mallinson, coinciding with the artist’s late-1970s move to Los Angeles. Mallinson worked downtown, creating paintings and drawings that channeled the form and logic of weaving. She focused her attention on employing pattern as a bridge between minimalist aesthetics and a more personal and feminine approach as part of the Pattern and Decoration art movement.

Mallinson joins MOCA assistant curator Rebecca Lowery in a conversation about her practice then, now, and in the context of the exhibition WITH PLEASURE—PATTERN AND DECORATION IN AMERICAN ART 1972–1985.*

CONSTANCE MALLINSON and REBECCA LOWERY IN CONVERSATION*

Thursday, January 23, at 7 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Constance Mallinson, artworks courtesy and © the artist, Jason Vass Gallery, and Edward Cella Art and Architecture. Photograph of Mallinson by Todd Gray, courtesy and © the photographer and Mallinson.

CHRISTINA QUARLES AT THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY

Christina Quarles makes expressive, gestural works that reference the history and techniques of painting, but also smartly test its limits. Her dynamic compositions often feature feminine tropes that reference domestic space—fabrics, patterns—alongside polymorphous and ambiguous figures arranged in contorted positions. Playing with the identity of the figure to expand the potential for representation in her work, Quarles explores the genre of figurative art as it has been captured in THE FOUNDATION OF THE MUSEUM—MOCA’S COLLECTION by Paul Mpagi Sepuya.*

ARTISTS ON ARTISTS—CHRISTINA QUARLES ON THE FOUNDATION OF THE MUSEUM*

Thursday, January 9, at 7 pm.

Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

152 North Central Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Christina Quarles, from top: Plaid About Yew, acrylic on canvas, 2018; Quarles, photograph by Daniel Dorsa; E’reything (Will Be All Right) Everything, acrylic on canvas, 2018; Slipped, Right to tha Side, acrylic on canvas, 2018. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Pilar Corrias, London.

JORDAN CASTEEL

Jordan Casteel—two of whose paintings are part of ONE DAY AT A TIME at MOCA—will discuss the exhibition at the museum during a public tour this weekend.

And Casteel’s museum show RETURNING THE GAZE will open in Denver next month.

JORDAN CASTEEL ON ONE DAY AT A TIME—MANNY FARBER AND TERMITE ART

Sunday, January 20, at 3 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

JORDAN CASTEEL—RETURNING THE GAZE

February 2 through August 18.

Denver Art Museum

100 West 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver.

From top: Jordan CasteelYahya, 2014, oil on canvas, collection of Jim and Julie Taylor, image courtesy Sargent’s Daughters, New York.; Jordan Casteel, Memorial, 2017, oil on canvas, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, image courtesy the artist and MOCAJordan CasteelBenyam, 2018, oil on canvas, Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg Collection, image courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York; Jordan Casteel, Glass Man Michael, 2016, oil on canvas, collection of John L. Thomson, Minneapolis, image courtesy the artist and MOCA. All images © Jordan Casteel.

REBECCA MORRIS ON LAURA OWENS

As part of MOCA’s Artists on Artists series in conjunction with the exhibition LAURA OWENS at the museum, Rebecca Morris will talk about the medium of painting in Owen’s practice.

(Morris’ exhibition THE ACHE OF BRIGHT will open January 11 in Houston.)

 

REBECCA MORRIS ON LAURA OWENS

Thursday, January 3, at 7 pm.

MOCA Geffen

152 North Central Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

 

REBECCA MORRIS—THE ACHE OF BRIGHT

January 11 through March 16.

Blaffer Art Museum

University of Houston

4173 Elgin Street, Houston.

Installation views of Laura Owens, November 11, 2018–March 25, 2019 at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Photographs by Brian Forrest.

OUT THERE: JOHN DIVOLA AND MARIUS ENGH IN CONVERSATION WITH DOROTHÉE PERRET

John Divola, from Zuma Series, 1977-1978. Courtesy of artist.

John Divola, from Zuma Series, 1977-1978. Courtesy of artist.

In PARIS, LA #11, John Divola, Marius Engh and Dorothée Perret discuss current practice, form, history, and the importance of ambiguity in art.

In 2013, John Divola‘s work was featured in a career-spanning series of exhibitions, titled As Far As I Could Get. It was on view at three Southern California institutions – the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the Pomona College Museum of Art, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The exhibition at LACMA is still on view until July 6, 2014. Divola’s Zuma Series was also featured in the landmark 2011 survey Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974-1981 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in downtown L.A. His images of abandoned beach shacks, featured in issue #11 of PARIS, LA, remain among the most influential – and appropriated – works of 20th Century photography.

Marius Engh is an artist from Norway who shows in galleries across Europe. At the time of his conversation with John Divola and Dorothée Perret he was enjoying his first extended stay in Los Angeles. How objects tell us stories through layers of space and time is the focus of his work.

 

Marius Engh, Lead, Follow or Get the Hell Out of the Way, 1-3/1-14, 2008. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr (Photo by Ralf Kliem)

Marius Engh, Lead, Follow or Get the Hell Out of the Way, 1-3/1-14, 2008. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr (Photo by Ralf Kliem)