Tag Archives: Nicole Eisenman

VENICE 2019 — GIARDINI

The Giardini section of the 2019 Venice Biennale includes a selection of mostly new work by Nicole Eisenman, Kaari Upson, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Joi Bittle and Dominique Gonzalez–Foerster, Jill Mulleady, and Hito Steyerl.

LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

Through November 24.

Giardini della Biennale

Venice.

From top: Nicole Eisenman, Morning Studio, 2016, oil on canvas, courtesy and © the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York; Kaari Upson, There is No Such Thing as Outside, 2019, HD video (still), courtesy and © the artist, Sprüth Magers, and Massimo de Carlo; Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Mama, Mummy and Mamma2014, acrylic, color pencils, charcoal and transfers on paper, courtesy and © the artist and Victoria Miro, London; Joi Bittle and Dominique Gonzalez–Foerster, Martian Dreams Ensemble, 2018, diorama detail, courtesy and © the artists; Jill MulleadyThis Connection is Not Private, 2018, oil on linen, courtesy and © the artist and Freedman Fitzpatrick; Hito Steyerl, Leonardo’s Submarine, 2019, three-screen video, courtesy and © the artist and installation photographer Naomi Rea.

PALIMPSEST

PALIMPSEST—an exhibition in Ireland about how temporal connections alter definitions of place—features the work of Nicole Eisenman, Zoe Leonard, Hilary Lloyd, Charlotte Prodger, Martine Syms, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, and Andrea Zittel.

Curated by Charlie Porter, the show will include a new text by Olivia Laing, author of the novel Crudo (2018), and The Trip to Echo Spring (2014), a memoir about writers and alcohol.

PALIMPSEST

Through October 13.

Lismore Castle Arts

Lismore, County Waterford.

From top: Charlotte Prodger, Sophie with Sheets 32015, inkjet print, stainless steel frame, glass, courtesy of the artist and Lismore Castle Arts; Martine Syms, Notes on Gesture (4), 2015, courtesy of the artist and Sadie Coles Gallery; Zoe LeonardUntitled, 2002, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.


FIRE AT BABY COMPANY

“Every time I enter a new room I scan for other queers. Maybe it’s a hunt for fleeting solidarity, maybe safety—not that the two are opposed. I didn’t know I did this until I didn’t have to, when I arrived in a place—[Fire Island]—where queer and its variants was the baseline. It is a profound experience, one I will never take for granted, even as I know the exclusions it enacts.

“This is a very personal show, in the sense that it has no pretensions of thoroughness or coherence. A series of friendships and encounters organized around a shared experience of finding one’s place. Just some people inhabiting a tiny speck of the world and—to borrow a phrase by Douglas Crimp, another friend from the island—misfitting together.” — Ryan McNamara*

McNamara brings Fire Island to Manhattan with a new exhibition of work by Travis BoyerJack BruscaTM DavyRaúl de NievesNicole EisenmanK8 HardyKia LabeijaMatthew LeifheitHanna LidenTiffany MalakootiSamuel RoeckPaul Mpagi SepuyaDevan ShimoyamaA.L. SteinerWolfgang TillmansCajsa von Zeipel, and himself.

FIRE*

Through April 14.

Baby Company

73 Allen Street, New York City.

*”Misfitting together” is a quote from Popism: The Warhol Sixties, by Andy Warhol and Pat Hackett (1980), referenced by Douglas Crimp in his book “Our Kind of Movie”: The Films of Andy Warhol (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2012), 157, note 29:

“I [Warhol] was reflecting that most people thought the Factory was a place where everybody had the same attitudes about everything; the truth was, we were all odds-and-ends misfits, somehow misfitting together.”

From top: Ryan McNamara, Cemical Compound (6/8/2018), 2019, wood, plaster, paint, psilocybin, amyl nitrate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, Truvada; Wolfgang Tillmans, Far away inside (Echo Beach), 2017, inkjet print; Matthew Leifheit; Meat Rack Gathering, 2018, dye sublimation print on aluminum; Nicole Eisenman and Tiffany Malakooti, Remarkable Lesbian Chess Set, 2016, clay, wood, and paint; A.L. Steiner, Untitled (Rachel on bay, Pines), 2016–2019; Fire installation view with K8 Hardy‘s jockstrap collection—Look Pines, 2016, fiberglass mannequin, metal base, cloth, enamel paint, synthetic wig—in foreground; Devan Shimoyama, Untitled, 2015–2018, dye-sublimation print on aluminum (2); Cajsa von Zeipel, Boy’s Tears, 2019, styrofoam, fiberglass, aqua resin, plaster; Travis Boyer, Le Fountain, 2019, embellished and dyed wool blanket on beeswax, wood, and steel frame; Jack Brusca, Pines Pavilion Logo, 1980, acrylic on canvas; Kia LaBeija, New Legend Lucky 007 on Fire Island, 2018, digital inkjet print.

MARILYN MINTER — ANGER MANAGEMENT

2018 is an election year, a chance to end Republican control of Congress.

Educate, organize, resist, register, vote…

… and check out the selection from Marilyn Minter and Andrianna Campbell’s ANGER MANAGEMENT, a pop-up featuring resistant work by John Baldessari, Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter, Zoe Buckman, Nicole Eisenman, Charles Gaines, Jenny Holzer, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Barbara Kruger, Glenn Ligon, Robert Longo, Laura Owens, Jack Pierson, Mary Ping, Faith Ringgold, Laurie Simmons, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and many others.

A portion of the proceeds will go to charity and to the Brooklyn Museum.

shop.brooklynmuseum.org/marilyn-minter-resist-t-shirt

 

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NEW MUSEUM — PUBLIC CONVERSATION

Carolee Schneemann, Carsten Höller, Kaari Upson, Ragnar Kjartansson, Cheryl Donegan, Elizabeth Peyton, Jeremy Deller, Nicole Eisenman, and George Condo are among the forty artists participating in WHO’S AFRAID OF THE NEW NOW?, a series of public conversations this weekend at the New Museum.

The event concludes on Sunday night, December 3, at 8 pm, with a conversation between Carol Bove and Joan Jonas.

WHO’S AFRAID OF THE NEW NOW?

Saturday and Sunday, December 2 and 3, from 10 am through 9 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

From top: Joan Jonas, photograph by Sebastian Kim; Allen RuppersbergWho’s Afraid of the New Now?, from the series Preview Suite, 1988, lithograph, courtesy the artist and Greene Naftali, New York.