Tag Archives: Nicole Eisenman

FIRE AT BABY COMPANY

“Every time I enter a new room I scan for other queers. Maybe it’s a hunt for fleeting solidarity, maybe safety—not that the two are opposed. I didn’t know I did this until I didn’t have to, when I arrived in a place—[Fire Island]—where queer and its variants was the baseline. It is a profound experience, one I will never take for granted, even as I know the exclusions it enacts.

“This is a very personal show, in the sense that it has no pretensions of thoroughness or coherence. A series of friendships and encounters organized around a shared experience of finding one’s place. Just some people inhabiting a tiny speck of the world and—to borrow a phrase by Douglas Crimp, another friend from the island—misfitting together.” — Ryan McNamara*

McNamara brings Fire Island to Manhattan with a new exhibition of work by Travis BoyerJack BruscaTM DavyRaúl de NievesNicole EisenmanK8 HardyKia LabeijaMatthew LeifheitHanna LidenTiffany MalakootiSamuel RoeckPaul Mpagi SepuyaDevan ShimoyamaA.L. SteinerWolfgang TillmansCajsa von Zeipel, and himself.

FIRE*

Through April 14.

Baby Company

73 Allen Street, New York City.

From top: Ryan McNamara, Cemical Compound (6/8/2018), 2019, wood, plaster, paint, psilocybin, amyl nitrate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, Truvada; Wolfgang Tillmans, Far away inside (Echo Beach), 2017, inkjet print; Matthew Leifheit; Meat Rack Gathering, 2018, dye sublimation print on aluminum; Nicole Eisenman and Tiffany Malakooti, Remarkable Lesbian Chess Set, 2016, clay, wood, and paint; A.L. Steiner, Untitled (Rachel on bay, Pines), 2016–2019; Fire installation view with K8 Hardy‘s jockstrap collection—Look Pines, 2016, fiberglass mannequin, metal base, cloth, enamel paint, synthetic wig—in foreground; Devan Shimoyama, Untitled, 2015–2018, dye-sublimation print on aluminum (2); Cajsa von Zeipel, Boy’s Tears, 2019, styrofoam, fiberglass, aqua resin, plaster; Travis Boyer, Le Fountain, 2019, embellished and dyed wool blanket on beeswax, wood, and steel frame; Jack Brusca, Pines Pavilion Logo, 1980, acrylic on canvas; Kia LaBeija, New Legend Lucky 007 on Fire Island, 2018, digital inkjet print.

MARILYN MINTER — ANGER MANAGEMENT

2018 is an election year, a chance to end Republican control of Congress.

Educate, organize, resist, register, vote…

… and check out the selection from Marilyn Minter and Andrianna Campbell’s ANGER MANAGEMENT, a pop-up featuring resistant work by John Baldessari, Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter, Zoe Buckman, Nicole Eisenman, Charles Gaines, Jenny Holzer, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Barbara Kruger, Glenn Ligon, Robert Longo, Laura Owens, Jack Pierson, Mary Ping, Faith Ringgold, Laurie Simmons, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and many others.

A portion of the proceeds will go to charity and to the Brooklyn Museum.

shop.brooklynmuseum.org/marilyn-minter-resist-t-shirt

 

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NEW MUSEUM — PUBLIC CONVERSATION

Carolee Schneemann, Carsten Höller, Kaari Upson, Ragnar Kjartansson, Cheryl Donegan, Elizabeth Peyton, Jeremy Deller, Nicole Eisenman, and George Condo are among the forty artists participating in WHO’S AFRAID OF THE NEW NOW?, a series of public conversations this weekend at the New Museum.

The event concludes on Sunday night, December 3, at 8 pm, with a conversation between Carol Bove and Joan Jonas.

WHO’S AFRAID OF THE NEW NOW?

Saturday and Sunday, December 2 and 3, from 10 am through 9 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

From top: Joan Jonas, photograph by Sebastian Kim; Allen RuppersbergWho’s Afraid of the New Now?, from the series Preview Suite, 1988, lithograph, courtesy the artist and Greene Naftali, New York.

WITH IT WHICH IT AS IT IF IT IS TO BE

“Each one is one and there are many.”

WITH IT WHICH IT AS IT IF IT IS TO BE, a new film by Eve Fowler, rises and falls to the tune of this line, written by Gertrude Stein in her 1910 short story “Many Many Women.” [The 33-minute 16mm film] is a lovingly made collective portrait of female artists at work in the studio….Fowler has directed her camera, through the cinematography of the artist and filmmaker Mariah Garnett, toward the intimate spaces of women’s art work. The film’s title is a line from Stein’s text which is read as voiceover by eight writers and artists….[each lending] a personal tone and inflection to the text, accentuating the subjective dimension of each artist’s individual labor and technique.

WITH IT WHICH IT AS IT IF IT IS TO BE documents the practices of over twenty artists based primarily in Los Angeles and New York, paying special attention to their process, their work with materials, their contemplative approaches, their manipulations. Shots cut from one studio to the next, and oscillate between focused close-ups of process-based activities and more casual portraits, where an atmosphere of trust and friendship clearly lies behind the screen. In one, the sculptor Daphne Fitzpatrick walks around her studio, a dog in tow—the feel is familiar, the portrait honest. In another, the painter Nicole Eisenman climbs atop a wooden scaffold to reach the upper portion of her large-scale canvas. There, she picks from an array of brushes before getting to work on one of her own complex, group portraits, which turns scenes from the everyday into the stuff of contemporary history painting. In yet another, the choreographer Taisha Paggett performs movement work as the camera attentively follows the gestures and modulations of her expressive body.” — Rachel Valinsky*

WITH IT WHICH IT AS IT IF IT IS TO BE, Thursday, July 27, at 7 pm.

MOCA GRAND AVENUE, 250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

moca.org/program/with-it-which-it-as-it-if-it-is-to-be-a-film-by-eve-fowler

*Rachel Valinsky is an independent curator, writer, and translator, and the quote here is from her review originally published in Millennium Film Journal, Issue 65, Spring 2017. Valinsky is the translator of Whites Jews and Us: Toward a Politics of Revolutionary Love by Houria Bouteldja (with a foreword by Cornel West), which Semiotext(e) will publish as part of their Intervention Series in September, 2017.

rachelvalinsky.com/Eve-Fowler-Participant-Inc-Millenium-Film-Journal

Image credit: With it which it as it if it is to be (2016), directed by Eve Fowler. 16mm film, sound, transferred to video, 33:02 minutes.

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NICOLE EISEMAN’S ANOTHER GREEN WORLD

Nicole Eisenman shows me a party scene entitled ANOTHER GREEN WORLD. I proudly yell ‘Eno!’ and she confirms that that’s the record she was listening to for days. The title also comes from the critic Northrop Frye, who contended that, in Shakespeare’s work, the characters were always going into the woods to find another mode of knowing or being—the green place that, in Eisenman’s sentiment, is where the poet or artist’s always gotta go.” — Eileen Myles*

In its current SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION show, MOCA Grand Avenue is exhibiting Eisenman’s ANOTHER GREEN WORLD (2015) in its south galleries. Don’t miss it.

(Eisenman will also be showing work at the decennial Skulptur Projekte Münster, June 10 through October 1, 2017.)

 

NICOLE EISENMAN—ANOTHER GREEN WORLD, ongoing.

MOCA GRAND AVENUE, 250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

moca.org/exhibition/selections-from-the-permanent-collection

 

*Eileen Myles, “Nicole Eisenman’s Green World,” Frieze, April 28, 2016:

frieze.com/article/nicole-eisenmans-green-world

Nicole Eisenman, Another Green World, 2015. Oil on canvas, 128 x 106 inches, (325.12 x 269.24 cm) Image credit: Nicole Eisenman and MOCA

Nicole Eisenman, Another Green World, 2015.
Oil on canvas, 128 x 106 inches, (325.12 x 269.24 cm)
Image credit: Nicole Eisenman and MOCA