Tag Archives: Paris-LA Magazine

TAYLOR MAC’S HIR

“Working catharsis is my art form, and one of the ways I do that is by the time-honored tradition of making something ridiculous…

“My job as a theater artist is to remind people of things they’ve forgotten about, or they’ve dismissed or buried, or other people have buried for them.” — Taylor Mac, PARIS LA*

Mac—an incandescent magpie of modern culture—is a champion of what he calls “authentic failure,” a process where the performer goes out on a limb and stays there:

“There’s something about getting up there, risking, falling flat on your ass, and then picking yourself up, that—when you’re watching it on a stage—is profound.”*

Mac the performer, in his transformative 24-Decade History of Popular Music shows, risks everything for six, twelve, twenty-four hours at a time. Mac the playwright concentrates his gender-queer socialism into two-hour projects and sends his actors out to walk the plank, where they thrive.

HIR—Mac’s 2014 play in its Los Angeles premiere at the Odyssey—is a wonderfully disturbing satire that imagines a long-abused family reaching its greatest potential by taking revenge on the abusive patriarch (Ron Bottitta), who was—according to his wife—another “mediocre straight white man who’s barely lifting a finger but thinks he’s lifting the world.”

Mom (Cynthia Kania)—who spends enriching weekends at the local museum with her daughter-turned-son Max (Puppett)—no longer cooks or cleans, so when soldier son Isaac (Zack Gearing) returns home from the Middle East, he walks into an exploded kitchen-sink drama of familial detritus.

“Hir”—pronounced “here”—is a pronoun that floats between “her” and “his.” HIR, the play, will be on the boards for only six more weeks. so get your tickets now.

HIR

Through March 17.

Odyssey Theatre Ensemble

2055 South Sepulveda Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

*See “A Time to Be Born: Taylor Mac in conversation with Barlo Perry, PARIS LA 15 (Spring 2017): 78–85.

From top: Cynthia Kania (left), Ron Bottitta, and Puppett in Hir; Kania, Puppett, and Zack Gearing; Kania; Gearing, Kania, and Puppett; Gearing, Bottitta, and Kania. Photographs by Enci Box.

HILTON ALS — A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN

“Troubled times get the tyrants and prophets they deserve. During our current epoch, the revival of interest in author James Baldwin has been particularly intense. This is in part due, of course, to his ability to analyze and articulate how power abuses through cunning and force and why, in the end, it’s up to the people to topple kingdoms.

“As a galvanizing humanitarian force, Baldwin is now being claimed as a kind of oracle. But by claiming him as such, much gets erased about the great artist in the process, specifically his sexuality and aestheticism, both of which informed his politics.” — Hilton Als*

GOD MADE MY FACE—A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN—a group show curated by Hilton Als, featuring the work of Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Alvin Baltrop, Beauford Delaney, Marlene Dumas, Ja’Tovia Gary, Glenn Ligon, Alice Neel, Cameron Rowland, Kara WalkerJane Evelyn Atwood, and James Welling—is on view through mid-February.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Metrograph and Als will present a series of films featuring Baldwin through the years, at home and abroad.

GOD MADE MY FACE—

A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN*

Through February 16.

David Zwirner

525 and 533 West 19th Street, New York City.

HILTON ALS ON JAMES BALDWIN FILM SERIES

Friday and Saturday, February 1 and 2.

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street, New York City.

See “The Energy of Joy: Hilton Als in conversation with David Bridel and Mary-Alice Daniel,” PARIS LA 16 (2019): 217–221.

From top: Marlene Dumas, James Baldwin, 2014, from the Great Men series exhibited at Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, image credit: Marlene Dumas/Bernard Ruijgrok PiezographicsBeauford Delaney, Dark Rapture, 1941, oil on canvas; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (man sitting), 1975-1986, photograph; Richard AvedonJames Baldwin, writer, Harlem, New York, 1945, © The Richard Avedon Foundation; Ja’Tovia Gary, An Ecstatic Experience, 2015, video still; Jane Evelyn AtwoodJames Baldwin with bust of himself sculpted by Larry Wolhandler, Paris, France, 1975 (detail), gelatin silver print. All images courtesy David Zwirner.

TOBIAS MADISON

O VERMELHO DO MEIO-DIA—a film and exhibition of collages by Tobias Madison—will be on view for one more week at Freedman Fitzpatrick in Los Angeles

The film—which was shot last year in São Paulo during the run-up to the eventual election of a far-right demagogue as Brazil’s president—began as a conversation between the artist, members of the collective MEXA, choreographer Luciana Mugayar, and curator Tobi Maier.

“The translation issues and misunderstandings arising from the situation were integrated into the process. The film became a way to hang out and to ponder upon if it is possible—as a member of MEXA stated in a group discussion—to betray every single image and still be truthful, or to abandon that idea in the first place and instead run an anti-fascist program against yourself.”*

TOBIAS MADISON—

O VERMELHO DO MEIO-DIA*

Through February 3.

Freedman Fitzpatrick

6051 Hollywood Boulevard, #107, Los Angeles.

See “Dream House NYC,” a photographic essay on youth by Tobias Madison, PARIS LA 16 (2019), 25–36.

Tobias MadisonO Vermelho do Meio-Dia (2018), Freedman Fitzpatrick. Images courtesy the artist and the gallery. © Tobias Madison.

HELEN MOLESWORTH READS ONE DAY AT A TIME

“When I sat in Manny’s lecture hall [in the fall/winter quarter of 1988], I had no inkling of what a curator even did…
“And my current understanding of its operations, demanding a constant oscillation between the big picture and the details—the big picture being the institution of the museum and its central role in the creation of value, the formation of canons, and the presentation of private artistic acts for public experience; the details involving the development of intimacies with both objects and their makers, the why and how of choosing specific objects, the why and how of installing them, and what each act of adjacency in an installation might connote—was still a decade away.” — Helen Molesworth*
.
This weekend, ONE DAY AT A TIME—MANNY FARBER AND TERMITE ART curator Helen Molesworth reads her titular catalogue essay in the exhibition’s gallery. Centered on Farber, the essay moves through the elusive definitions of termite art, still life, and the everyday.

HELEN MOLESWORTH READS ONE DAY AT A TIME

Sunday, January 13, at 3 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

 

See “Under the Volcano: Helen Molesworth in conversation with Dorothée Perret,” PARIS LA 14 (Winter 2016): 29–37.

*Helen Molesworth, “One Day at a Time,” in One Day at a Time: Manny Farber and Termite Art (Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art/Munich: DelMonico Books-Prestel, 2018

CAROLINE SHAW — ANDREW NORMAN — NADIA SIROTA

“When I wrote Partita for 8 Voices, it was like if you had the little box of eight crayons for a long time, and then you suddenly have the box with 64, with the little pencil sharpener in the back, you kind of go all out.

“I like writing for string quartet because it’s not a wildly new palette, but there’s something constantly exciting about it. I don’t know why we make music, make art, or write… but [there’s] something about it—it’s like you just have to keep carving.” — Caroline ShawPARIS LA, 2017*

Join composer-musicians Caroline Shaw and Andrew Norman, the music ensemble Wild Up, and host (and viola player) Nadia Sirota for an “enhanced concert” featuring live performances of Shaw’s and Norman’s work, and free-wheeling conversations about their process.

This celebration of music creation is presented by CAP UCLA in downtown Los Angeles.

NADIA SIROTA—LIVING MUSIC LIVE!

with WILD UP

featuring CAROLINE SHAW

and ANDREW NORMAN

Saturday, January 12, at 8 pm.

Theatre at Ace Hotel

929 South Broadway, Los Angeles.

*“The Lilt and the Friction: Caroline Shaw in conversation with Anh Do and Eli Diner,” PARIS LA 15 (Spring 2017): 61–69.

From top:

Nadia Sirota, a Live Podcast Event with Wild Up featuring Andrew Norman and Caroline Shaw. Photograph by Shervin Lainez.

Andrew Norman. Photograph by Craig T. Matthew.

Caroline Shaw (left), Norman, and Sirota at the Theatre at Ace Hotel, January 12, 2019. Image courtesy CAP UCLA.

Shaw. Photograph by Kait Moreno.