Tag Archives: Ragnar Kjartansson

MOURNING — ON LOSS AND CHANGE

MOURNING—ON LOSS AND CHANGE, curated by Brigitte Kölle, looks at death and grief through the eyes and works of nearly thirty contemporary artists.

Participants include Bas Jan Ader, Kudjoe Affutu, Khaled Barakeh, Christian Boltanski, Helen Cammock, Anne Collier, Johannes Esper, Sibylle Fendt, Seiichi Furuya, Paul Fusco, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Aslan Ġoisum, Ragnar Kjartansson, Maria Lassnig, Jennifer Loeber, Ataa Oko, Adrian Paci, Philippe Parreno, Susan Philipsz, Greta Rauer, Willem de Rooij, Michael Sailstorfer, Thomas Schütte, Dread Scott, Rein Jelle Terpstra, Rosemarie Trockel, Tilman Walther, and Andy Warhol.

Cammock—recent joint winner of the Turner Prize—makes her German debut with the exhibition, which includes a sound piece produced by Philipsz that “revives the old mourning tradition of keening in the atrium of the Gallery of Contemporary Art.”*

A bilingual exhibition booklet can be viewed here.

MOURNING—ON LOSS AND CHANGE*

Through June 14.

Hamburger Kunsthalle

Glockengiesserwall 5, Hamburg.

Mourning—On Loss and Change, Hamburger Kunsthalle, February 7–June 14, 2020 , from top: Maria Lassnig, Balken im Auge / Trauernde Hände, 1964; Khaled Barakeh, The Untitled Images, 2014; Helen Cammock, Untitled, (If You Won’t Be Touched) Shouting in Whispers, 2017; Seiichi Furuya, Mémoires, 2012; Ragnar Kjartansson, God, 2007; Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968/2019; Andy Warhol, Jackie, 1964; Anne Collier, Woman Crying (Comic) #8, 2019. Images courtesy and © the artists (and their estates and galleries), the photographers, and Hamburger Kunsthalle.

RAGNAR KJARTANSSON — THE VISITORS

Ragnar Kjartansson’s magnificent multi-screen video installation THE VISITORS is now on view at Kiasma in Helsinki.

RAGNAR KJARTANSSON—THE VISITORS

Through February 2.

Kiasma, Finnish National Gallery

Mannerheiminaukio 2, Helsinki.

Ragnar Kjartansson, The Visitors. Kjartansson, below. Images courtesy and © the artist.

NEW MUSEUM — PUBLIC CONVERSATION

Carolee Schneemann, Carsten Höller, Kaari Upson, Ragnar Kjartansson, Cheryl Donegan, Elizabeth Peyton, Jeremy Deller, Nicole Eisenman, and George Condo are among the forty artists participating in WHO’S AFRAID OF THE NEW NOW?, a series of public conversations this weekend at the New Museum.

The event concludes on Sunday night, December 3, at 8 pm, with a conversation between Carol Bove and Joan Jonas.

WHO’S AFRAID OF THE NEW NOW?

Saturday and Sunday, December 2 and 3, from 10 am through 9 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

From top: Joan Jonas, photograph by Sebastian Kim; Allen RuppersbergWho’s Afraid of the New Now?, from the series Preview Suite, 1988, lithograph, courtesy the artist and Greene Naftali, New York.

A DAY AT THE NEW MUSEUM

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Last weekend I was in New York City, where I caught three exhibitions at the New Museum before they closed: Camille Henrot, David Horvitz, and Ragnar Kjartansson.

I was very taken with Camille Henrot’s piece Is It Possible to be a Revolutionary and Like Flowers? (2012-14), where the artist translated books from her personal library into ikebana arrangements. The work was very poetic, beautiful, and at times humorous.

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I have always loved David Horvitz’s work, which occupied the back staircase and small adjacent gallery. A series of vessels were made of broken glass Horvitz collected on the shores of New York, melted down, and handblown into these new forms.

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These two iPhones displayed recordings of the sunset taken by both Horvitz and his mother on the same day.

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In 2012, Horvitz uploaded this self-portrait onto the Wikipedia page for “Mood Disorder” and it has since circulated and been used in multiple articles online related to mood disorders, depression, sadness, etc.

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Ragnar Kjartansson’s installation featured work made with, and about his family. His parents were both actors in an Icelandic film where they make love on the kitchen floor, and as rumor has it, conceived Ragnar. In his installation he presents this scene from the film along with a live performance by musicians who play a song by Sigur Rós.

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