Tag Archives: REGEN PROJECTS

KADER ATTIA — THE VALLEY OF DREAMS

The artistic language of Kader Attia takes its departure from the mixed cultures between France and Algeria that have accompanied him since his childhood. The painful history encompassed in the complex relationships of these countries, the colonizer and the colonized, has implemented a concept he envisions in the form of a trilogy around the themes of reappropriation, reparation, and repair. His work investigates historical, sociological, anthropological, and philosophical facets and phenomenon of traditional and modern societies. Through meticulous artistic analyses, Attia breaks away from binary dynamics and introduces dialogs turned toward notions of lineage and continuity while questioning senses of beauty. 

THE VALLEY OF DREAMS—Attia’s debut solo show at Regen Projects in Los Angeles—is a continuum of his research and investigations. Taking the promised land of the American West as a point of reference, Attia draws lines and mise en abimes with Arabian landscapes such as the sea and the desert. If he uses the land as a metaphor, Attia also questions the ways western cultures deal with the idea of injury—a concept he necessarily associates with one of repair. Where traditional cultures celebrate these marks with emphasis and artifacts, cultures of whiteness have been in complete denial in the face of it. However, Attia sees the trauma in these gestures of brutal erasure and buried histories.

What Attia offers through his rigorous science is an aesthetical therapy, where imagination through meaning heals the wounds. As he puts it: “Repair is an oxymoron, because ‘injury’ is its raison d’être. One cannot think about repairing something that hasn’t been injured. The state of the injured thing (the failure) and the state of the repaired thing (the repair) are forever bound in a causal layout that runs in the ethical and aesthetic loop of repair. This is true for all metaphors of repair: natural, cultural, political, immaterial, and so on…”

See link below for exhibition information.

KADER ATTIA—THE VALLEY OF DREAMS

Through December 23, by appointment.

Regen Projects

6750 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Kader Attia, The Valley of Dreams, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, November 12, 2020–December 23, 2020, from top: Rochers Carrés, 2020, lightbox; Untitled, 2020, collage, ink, photograph, photocopy, print on paper; Untitled, 2020, Kraft paper with blue pigment framed in plexiglass box; installation view; Untitled, 2020, ceramic, terracotta, epoxy resin and steel plinth; Untitled (Skyline), 2007, refrigerators, mirror fragments; The Dead Sea (detail), 2015, floor installation made of secondhand blue clothes; Mirror Mask, 2020, wooden mask, mirror fragments, black pigment; Untitled, 2020, henna and thread on canvas. Images © Kader Attia, photographed by Evan Bedford, courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects.

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Fourteen at-risk non-profit visual arts organizations in New York City—Artists Space, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Dia Art Foundation, the The Drawing CenterEl Museo del BarrioHigh Line Art, MoMA PS1, New Museum, Public Art Fund, Queens Museum, Sculpture Center, the The Studio Museum in Harlem, Swiss Institute, and White Columns—will benefit from the sale of artwork made available as part of the Hauser & Wirth initiative ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK.

Two non-profit charitable partners are also supported: The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts (FCA).

Located at the gallery’s two New York locations and online, more than 100 artists are participating in the project, including Rita Ackermann, Kelly Akashi, Ida Applebroog, Genesis Belanger, Lynda Benglis, Katherine Bernhardt, Huma Bhabha, Carol Bove, Katherine Bradford, Sam Falls, Charles Gaines, Maureen Gallace, Joanne Greenbaum, Mona Hatoum, Mary Heilmann, Camille Henrot, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Shara Hughes, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Sanya Kantarovsky, June Leaf, Simone Leigh, Zoe Leonard, Glenn Ligon, Sam McKinniss, Marilyn Minter, Sarah Morris, Angel Otero, Adam Pendleton, Elizabeth Peyton, Jack Pierson, R.H. Quaytman, Deborah Roberts, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Tschabalala Self, Amy Sherald, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Laurie Simmons, Taryn Simon, Lorna Simpson, Avery Singer, Sarah Sze, Kara Walker, Mary Weatherford, and the estate of Anne Truitt.

See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Through October 22.

Hauser & Wirth

548 West 22nd Street, New York City.

32 East 69th Street, New York City.

From top: Lorna Simpson, Haze, 2019, ink and screenprint on gessoed fiberglass, photograph by James Wang, image courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth; Kelly Akashi, Feel Me (Flesh), 2020, hand-blown glass and bronze, image courtesy and © the artist, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and François Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles; Mary Weatherford, Meeting in the Forest, 2019, flashe and neon on linen, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen Studio, image courtesy and © the artist, David Kordansky Gallery, and Gagosian; Rashid Johnson, Standing Broken Men, 2020, ceramic tile, mirror tile, spray enamel, oil soap, black stick, wax, photograph by Martin Parsekian, image courtesy and © the artist; Jack Pierson, Inquire Within, 2020, metal and wood, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Angel Otero, Sleepy Fire, 2020, oil paint and fabric collaged on canvas, image courtesy and © Lehmann Maupin; Jenny Holzer, from Survival (1983–85), 2020, photograph by Graham Kelman, image courtesy and © the artist and Artist Rights Society (ARS).


ARTISTS FOR BIDEN FUNDRAISER

Over 100 artists and estates have donated works for a fundraiser supporting Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.* Presented on Platform.art—an initiative developed by David Zwirner—participating galleries include Regen Projects, Jack Shainman, Gladstone, Lehmann Maupin, Petzel, and Marian Goodman, as well as Gemini G.E.L.

Following a virtual kickoff earlier this week with vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris, Carrie Mae Weems, and Catherine Opie, the sale is now live. See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR BIDEN

October 2–October 8, 2020.

Platform.art

*Participating artists and estates include Marina Adams, Doug Aitken, Richard Aldrich, John Baldessari (donated by Gemini G.E.L.), Alvin Baltrop, Walead Beshty, McArthur Binion, Dike Blair, Sebastian Blanck, Carol Bove, Cecily Brown, George Condo, Patricia Cronin, Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Tara Donovan, Carroll Dunham, Marcel Dzama, William Eggleston, Rafa Esparza, Shepard Fairey, Rochelle Feinstein, Radamés “Juni” Figueroa​, Spencer Finch, Suzan Frecon, Charles Gaines, Jerrell Gibbs, Sam Gilliam, Joanne Greenbaum, Isca Greenfield-Sanders, Thomas Hager, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Tyler Haughey, Michael Heizer, Carmen Herrera, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Jenny Holzer, Ridley Howard, Alex Hubbard, John Huggins, Ayana V. Jackson, Rashid Johnson, Deborah Kass, KAWS, Ellsworth Kelly, Jon Kessler, Toba Khedoori, Christine Sun Kim, Jeff Koons, Doron Langberg, Liz Larner, Bonnie Lautenberg, An-My Lê, Roy Lichtenstein, Maya Lin, Robert Longo, Emmanuel Lubezki, Brice Marden, Julie Mehretu, Marilyn Minter, Ivan Morley, Rebecca Morris, Vik Muniz, Wangechi Mutu, Jordan Nassar, Alice Neel, Shirin Neshat, Catherine Opie, Angel Otero, Jack Pierson, Lari Pittman, Martin Puryear, Christina Quarles, Robert Rauschenberg (donated by Gemini G.E.L.), Alexis Rockman, Ugo Rondinone, Victoria Roth, Ed Ruscha, Alison Saar, Betye Saar, Fred Sandback, Fanny Sanín, Kenny Scharf, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Gary Simmons, Laurie Simmons, Xaviera Simmons, Vaughn Spann, Tavares Strachan, Sarah Sze, Mika Tajima, Kyle Thurman, Fred Tomaselli, Leo Villareal, Charline von Heyl, Carrie Mae Weems, Lawrence Weiner, James Welling, Stanley Whitney, Kehinde Wiley, Chloe Wise, Christopher Wool, Rob Wynne, Lisa Yuskavage, and Andrea Zittel.

From top: Carrie Mae WeemsRemember to Dream, 2020, screenprint on rag paper, printed by Kaleb Hunkele of Standard Art Supply, image courtesy and © the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Michael Heizer, Blue Diorite, 1981, 89-lb. blue diorite in aluminum frame, image © Michael Heizer, courtesy Agnes Gund, the artist, and Gagosian, photograph by Rob McKeever, donated by a private collector; Carol BoveCoy Satanism, 2020, stainless steel and urethane paint, image courtesy and © the artist and David Zwirner; Liz Larner, Fictile, 2010–2011, ceramic and epoxy, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Kyle Thurman, Suggested Occupation 56 (Spring Image, travel nightly), 2020, gouache, graphite, and watercolor on paper in artist’s frame, image courtesy and © the artist and David Lewis; Charline von Heyl, The Sticky Hour, 2018, acrylic and crayon on linen, image courtesy and © the artist and Petzel Gallery; Tavares StrachanWe Are in This Together (Multi),, 2019, neon and transformers, image courtesy and © the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery; Jenny Holzer, selection from Truisms: Abuse of power comes as no surprise, 2015, dark labradorite footstool, image courtesy and © the artist and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Sam Gilliam, Untitled, 2020, watercolor on washi paper, image courtesy and © the artist and David Kordansky Gallery; KAWS, Together, 2017, painted bronze, image courtesy and © the artist; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (profile portrait), n.d., gelatin silver print, image courtesy and © the Alvin Baltrop Trust, Third Streaming, and Galerie Buchholz; Lari Pittman, Portrait of a Human (Pathos, Ethos, Logos, Kairos #17), 2018, cel vinyl and spray paint on linen on wood panel, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Ed RuschaWe (#1), dry pigment and acrylic on paper, 2020, image courtesy and © the artist.

ANDREA ZITTEL — WORKS 2005–2020

I always knew that I wanted my work to function in the everyday world—more so than in the art world. And ultimately New York was not my culture… I loved it there so much, but I would walk around and think, “This place is so different from where I come from, from everything that I know, and I’ll never be able to participate in a way that really matters here.” The Southern California desert is a culture that I’m really comfortable with…

I’ve worked by myself mostly because I’m comfortable putting these demands on myself that I’m not comfortable putting on anyone else, even my son. There’s a very limited scope in terms of who I’m willing to preach to. It makes me happy if my ideas challenge people, but I would imagine people taking those ideas and making their own versions of those things for themselves. It would actually be pretty weird if everyone followed my programs.Andrea Zittel*

WORKS 2005–2020Andrea Zittel’s new exhibition at Regen Projects—”brings together a diverse array of works made over a fifteen-year period that examine conceptual aspects of production, materiality, and use, and reflect Zittel’s ongoing aesthetic inquiry into what it means to exist and participate in culture today.”

The show is on view by appointment only. See link below for further exhibition details.

ANDREA ZITTEL—WORKS 2005–2020

Through August 21.

Regen Projects

6750 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*Andrea Zittel, interview by Alix Browne, Apartamento 18 (Autumn–Winter 2016–2017), 37–71.

See Zittel, “Silent Spring,” Artforum 58, no. 9 (May / June 2020).

Andrea Zittel, Works 2005–2020, Regen Projects, July 13, 2020–August 21, 2020, from top: A-Z Aggregated Stack #13, 2012, cardboard, plaster gauze; A-Z Cover Series 1 (Gold and Black Stripes) (detail), 2012, woven wool and steel, ten panels; RAUGH Furniture: Energetic Accumulator II, 2008, wood, Danish oil, rigid wrap, electric tea kettle, ceramic mugs, wool, radio, felt, glass jars with tokens on carpet; Study for Bench Sequence #2, 2019, watercolor and gouache on paper; Study for Cellular Grid #1, 2018, watercolor and gouache on paper; A-Z Aggregated Stacks, 2015, cardboard, plaster, gauze, paint; A-Z Aggregated Stacks, 2015, cardboard, plaster, gauze, paint; Planar Studies: Vast and Specific 12, 2020, watercolor and gouache on paper; Planar Studies: Vast and Specific 10, 2020, watercolor and gouache on paper; Linear Sequence #1, 2016, powder-coated steel and aluminum, tung oiled Birdseye Maple Plywood, brass, 3 cushions; Study for Radiating Arenas of Enhancement, 2006, gouache on paper; Study for Radiating Arenas of Enhancement, 2006, gouache on paper; A-Z Aggregated Stacks, 2015, cardboard, plaster, gauze, paint. Images courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects.

CHRISTINA QUARLES AT THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY

Christina Quarles makes expressive, gestural works that reference the history and techniques of painting, but also smartly test its limits. Her dynamic compositions often feature feminine tropes that reference domestic space—fabrics, patterns—alongside polymorphous and ambiguous figures arranged in contorted positions. Playing with the identity of the figure to expand the potential for representation in her work, Quarles explores the genre of figurative art as it has been captured in THE FOUNDATION OF THE MUSEUM—MOCA’S COLLECTION by Paul Mpagi Sepuya.*

ARTISTS ON ARTISTS—CHRISTINA QUARLES ON THE FOUNDATION OF THE MUSEUM*

Thursday, January 9, at 7 pm.

Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

152 North Central Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Christina Quarles, from top: Plaid About Yew, acrylic on canvas, 2018; Quarles, photograph by Daniel Dorsa; E’reything (Will Be All Right) Everything, acrylic on canvas, 2018; Slipped, Right to tha Side, acrylic on canvas, 2018. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Pilar Corrias, London.