Tag Archives: Richard Avedon

FUNNY FACE, PARIS BLUES

Pink is the navy blue of India. — Diana Vreeland

Long before her international fame as editor-in-chief of Vogue in the sixties and the “Empress of Fashion” at the Met’s Costume Institute in the seventies and eighties, Diana Vreeland was a legend in Manhattan creative circles. As Harper’s Bazaar‘s fashion editor, she was the inspiration for Allison Du Bois in the Kurt Weill-Ira Gershwin-Moss Hart musical Lady in the Dark (1941). And Kay Thompson played Maggie Prescott, a version of Vreeland, in the dazzling Paramount musical FUNNY FACE (1957, directed by Stanley Donen).

Upon discovering Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn), a lovely, philosophical clerk in a Greenwich Village bookstore, Prescott and photographer Dick Avery (Fred Astaire, in a role based on Richard Avedon) sweep Jo uptown for a test shoot. Maggie orders her office minions to chop off Jo’s hair and paint her with a “marvelous mouth.” Jo resists, but gives in once she realizes her new modeling gig comes with a paid trip to Paris, home of Jean-Paul Sartre.

This weekend, as part of its series Runaway Hollywood—Global Production in a Postwar World, the UCLA Film and Television Archive will screen FUNNY FACE, followed by the black-and-white Paul Newman-Sidney Poitier vehicle PARIS BLUES (1961, directed by Martin Ritt). The story of two American jazz musicians in Paris, the tourists they fall for (Joanne Woodward and Diahann Carroll), and the Latin Quarter dives at the center of their expat scene, PARIS BLUES features a score composed by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn.

FUNNY FACE and PARIS BLUES

Saturday, July 27, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater—Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Audrey Hepburn in Funny Face; Kay Thompson performing the “Think Pink” number; Thompson, Fred Astaire, and Hepburn after wrapping up “Bonjour, Paris!”; Verve album cover; Diahann Carroll and Sidney Poitier in Paris Blues; Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman; Louis Armstrong (left), Poitier, and Newman on set.

VINCE ALETTI’S ISSUES

Who better than Vince Aletti to organize and aggregate a virtual tour of his massive and coveted collection of periodicals into the pages of a deluxe art book?

Something like this awaits the readers of ISSUES, a new publication from Phaidon.

The book includes work by Diane Arbus, Corinne Day, Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton, Edward Steichen, Toni Frissell, Irving Penn, Horst, Collier Schorr, Inez Van Lamsweerde, Vinoodh Matadin, Bill Cunningham, and Cindy Sherman.

VINCE ALETTI—ISSUES: A HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN FASHION MAGAZINES (London: Phaidon, 2019).

From top: Horst P. Horst, Vogue, June 1, 1940, cover model Lisa Fonssagrives; Melvin Sokolsky, Harper’s Bazaar, March 1963, model Simone D’Aillencourt; Vince Aletti‘s apartment, photographed by Jason Schmidt, courtesy of the photographer and Phaidon; Corinne Day, The Face, July 1990, model Kate Moss.

HILTON ALS — A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN

“Troubled times get the tyrants and prophets they deserve. During our current epoch, the revival of interest in author James Baldwin has been particularly intense. This is in part due, of course, to his ability to analyze and articulate how power abuses through cunning and force and why, in the end, it’s up to the people to topple kingdoms.

“As a galvanizing humanitarian force, Baldwin is now being claimed as a kind of oracle. But by claiming him as such, much gets erased about the great artist in the process, specifically his sexuality and aestheticism, both of which informed his politics.” — Hilton Als*

GOD MADE MY FACE—A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN—a group show curated by Hilton Als, featuring the work of Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Alvin Baltrop, Beauford Delaney, Marlene Dumas, Ja’Tovia Gary, Glenn Ligon, Alice Neel, Cameron Rowland, Kara WalkerJane Evelyn Atwood, and James Welling—is on view through mid-February.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Metrograph and Als will present a series of films featuring Baldwin through the years, at home and abroad.

GOD MADE MY FACE—

A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN*

Through February 16.

David Zwirner

525 and 533 West 19th Street, New York City.

HILTON ALS ON JAMES BALDWIN FILM SERIES

Friday and Saturday, February 1 and 2.

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street, New York City.

See “The Energy of Joy: Hilton Als in conversation with David Bridel and Mary-Alice Daniel,” PARIS LA 16 (2019): 217–221.

From top: Marlene Dumas, James Baldwin, 2014, from the Great Men series exhibited at Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, image credit: Marlene Dumas and Bernard Ruijgrok PiezographicsBeauford Delaney, Dark Rapture, 1941, oil on canvas; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (man sitting), 1975-1986, photograph; Richard AvedonJames Baldwin, writer, Harlem, New York, 1945, © The Richard Avedon Foundation; Ja’Tovia Gary, An Ecstatic Experience, 2015, video still; Jane Evelyn AtwoodJames Baldwin with bust of himself sculpted by Larry Wolhandler, Paris, France, 1975 (detail), gelatin silver print. All images courtesy David Zwirner.

FLO KENNEDY

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“I feel that in a society where there is institutionalized oppression, the thing is to catch government and business in the grass—actually humping, you know. Forming a picket line or organizing a demonstration is not going to change the whole society, but there are cases in which it’s the sort of thing one ought to do. Every so often one just has to put one’s bucket down where one is…

“ ‘Revolutionary’ doesn’t always mean that you’re cocking a gun. Revolutionary means that you go precisely the opposite of the way the establishment had you programmed. Those of us who are unimaginative, unskilled, untutored must do routine things as putting our lives on the line. That’s not real revolution. That’s masochism. True revolutionary activity, in my opinion, is that which hurts the establishment without undue damage to the person who does the revolutionary act.” — Florynce “Flo” Kennedy*

*Quote in Richard Avedon, The Sixties, interviews by Doon Arbus (New York: Random House, 1999).

avedonfoundation.org/the-sixties

SHERIE M. RANDOLPH

FLORYNCE “FLO” KENNEDY: THE LIFE OF A BLACK FEMINIST RADICAL

(Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018 paperback edition).

uncpress.org/florynce-flo-kennedy/

“Never pose for a photograph where everyone in the photograph is white.” — Gloria Steinem, to USC students in 2016.
From left: Ti-Grace Atkinson, Kennedy, Steinem, and Kate Millett in 1977. Photograph by Bettye Lane / UNC Press.
What's missing from this book? Pioneering black feminist Flo Kennedy's blazing personality

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JAMES BALDWIN AND RICHARD AVEDON — NOTHING PERSONAL

“It has always been much easier (because it has always seemed much safer) to give a name to the evil without than to locate the terror within. And yet, the terror within is far truer and far more powerful than any of our labels: the labels change, the terror is constant. And this terror has something to do with that irreducible gap between the self one invents—the self one takes oneself as being, which is, however and by definition, a provisional self—and the undiscoverable self which always has the power to blow the provisional self to bits. It is perfectly possible—indeed, it is far from uncommon—to go to bed one night, or wake up one morning, or simply walk through a door one has known all one’s life, and discover, between inhaling and exhaling, that the self one has sewn together with such effort is all dirty rags, is unusable, is gone: and out of what raw material will one build a self again? The lives of men—and, therefore, of nations—to an extent literally unimaginable, depend on how vividly this question lives in the mind. It is a question which can paralyze the mind, of course; but if the question does not live in the mind, then one is simply condemned to eternal youth, which is a synonym for corruption.” — James Baldwin, from his essay “Nothing Personal”

Taschen’s NOTHING PERSONAL reprints the landmark 1964 collaboration between Richard Avedon and James Baldwin, and includes a supplementary booklet with outtakes, correspondence, and a new essay by Hilton Als.

A gallery exhibition of Avedon’s work from from book will be up at Pace MacGill until mid-January.

 

NOTHING PERSONAL—RICHARD AVEDON and JAMES BALDWIN

Taschentaschen.com/richard_avedon_james_baldwin_nothing_personal

RICHARD AVEDON—NOTHING PERSONAL, through January 13.

PACE MACGILL, 537 West 24th Street, New York City.

pacemacgill.com/show

avedonfoundation.org/nothing-personal-1964-essay-by-james-baldwin

See: aperture.org/vision-justice-online-nothing-personal/

 

From top:

Pace MacGill installation view.

Original book cover, Atheneum, 1964.

Richard Avedon, Julian Bond and members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Atlanta, Georgia, March 23, 1963, from Nothing Personal.

Richard Avedon, Dorothy Parker, from Nothing Personal. Avedon’s portrait of the great American writer, wit, and original member of the Algonquin Round Table was taken in 1958.

Nothing PersonalNothing PersonalCover of Richard Avedon and James Baldwin, Nothing Personal, 1964

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Spread from Richard Avedon and James Baldwin's Nothing Personal, 1964

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