Tag Archives: Richard Serra

HARALD SZEEMANN — SELECTED WRITINGS

Harald Szeemann (1933–2005)—curator, artist, art historian, and “secretary general” of the legendary documenta 5—was an exhibition maker nonpareil. HARALD SZEEMANN: SELECTED WRITINGS—published in conjunction with last year’s exhibition Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions at the Getty Research Institute (home of the Harald Szeemann Papers)—brings together over seventy essays and interviews, many published in English for the first time.

Richly illustrated throughout, the book contains a 20-page section of plates, including Szeemann’s artwork, exhibition diagrams, installation views, archival photographs, and other ephemera.

“I’m an existentialist. You are thrown in the universe from somewhere and are, once here, responsible for your acts. But it’s always a privilege to fall into a well-made bed. In this case, the Kunsthalle Bern in 1961…

“The historical moment, when the image of the creator/curator became conscious and evident, happened in 1969, when I organized When Attitudes Become Form and the artists arrived and installed their works and the TV reports publicized it. Beuys put his grease on the walls, Heizer made a hole in the public sidewalk, Artschwager distributed his blps in the city, Barry put the building under radiation, Weiner removed a square meter of wall, Ruthenbeck ruined the wooden floor with his wet ashes, Serra threw melted lead against the wall, etc., etc. This was no longer perceived as an art exhibition but as an archaic provocation—not by the artists, but by the curator who allowed it.” — Harald Szeemann*

HARALD SZEEMANN: SELECTED WRITINGS. Edited by Doris Chon, Glenn Phillips, and Pietro Rigolo. Translated by Jonathan Blower and Elizabeth Tucker. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2018.

In New York, the Swiss Institute has restaged GRANDFATHER: A PIONEER LIKE USthe 1974 exhibition Szeemann organized in his Bern apartment two years after documenta 5.

HARALD SZEEMANN—GRANDFATHER: A PIONEER LIKE US

Through August 18.

Swiss Institute

38 St. Marks Place, New York City.

*”Making Things Possible: A Conversation with Harald Szeemann.” Interview by Beti Žerovc. In Harald Szeemann—Selected Writings, 383–393.

From top, left to right: Harald Szeemann, in the 1990s in the Fabbrica Rosa, his office and archive in Maggia, Switzerland, photograph Fredo Meyer-Henn, State Archive of Canton Bern; Szeemann’s address list for his 1968 research trip to New York—for the Kunsthalle Bern exhibition Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form (1969)—includes contact info for Eva Hesse, Hans Haacke, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, and Lucas Samaras; Szeemann (seated) on the last night of documenta 5, 1972, photograph by Balthasar Burkhard; Getty Publications book cover; Lidija Delić, poster art commissioned by the Swiss Institute for the Grandfather: A Pioneer Like Us exhibition; Oasis No. 7, Haus-Rucker-Co (Laurids Ortner, Manfred Ortner, Klaus Pinter, Günter Zamp Kelp), 1972, documenta 5: Questioning Reality—Image Worlds Today, Kassel, 1972; part of Szeemann’s rubber stamp collection; Szeemann. Images courtesy the Harald Szeeman Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © J. Paul Getty Trust.

HAL FOSTER IN CONVERSATION

“I’m a writer first, a critic-historian-theorist second. That said, I’ve never wanted the writing to be self-involved or involuted; I’ve always wanted to be as lucid as possible—difficult but lucid… I don’t like it when criticism becomes subjectivist; that’s not much more than sensibility criticism come again…

“Most people think we are in a ‘post-critical age’; they even hope we are. I understand the fatigue with the negativity of criticism, but mostly that fatigue is laziness—and an anti-intellectualism that is far more American than apple pie ever was. It’s obvious that we need criticism now more than ever.” — Hal Foster*

Hal Foster—who is a visiting Getty scholar this semester and whose new book collects fifteen years of conversations with Richard Serra—recently spoke at LACMA, and will give two more public conversations over the next week or so.

JASON E. SMITH PRESENTS HAL FOSTER

Tuesday, February 26, at 7:30 pm

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

HAL FOSTER AND CHARLES RAY

Wednesday, March 6, at 7:30 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Westwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Hal Foster,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 154.

From top: Hal Foster, courtesy Hammer Museum; book cover credits: Yale University Press; Verso Books (cover illustration, Isa Genzken, X-Ray, 1991, black-and-white photograph, Galerie Buchholz, Berlin and Cologne); The New Press.

RICHARD SERRA — FILMS AND VIDEOTAPES

“The content of the film [Railroad Turnbridge] has to do with the transition, between 1906 and 1925, from welded iron construction to riveting; and as soon as they began riveting, they built extraordinary steel structures, epitomized by the bridges we have in this country….[which] are the most obvious representations that we have of indigenous, unpretentious building….You don’t have to understand what sculpture has been in this country to have a love affair with American bridges.

Railroad Turnbridge took a year to shoot; I went out to Portland [Oregon] six times. I didn’t go out and shoot a bridge because I thought it was an interesting industrial object, or an indigenous American relic. I think there was really a need to investigate what ‘bridgeness’ meant to me.” — Richard Serra, in a 1979 interview with Annette Michelson*

The exhibition RICHARD SERRA—FILMS AND VIDEOTAPES presents sixteen films and videos Richard Serra made between 1968 and 1979. All works will be screened in the original formats.

RICHARD SERRA—FILMS AND VIDEOTAPES, through October 17.

KUNSTMUSEUM BASEL/GEGENWART, St. Alban-Rheinweg 60, Basel.

kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/exhibitions/2017/richard-serra

* “The Films of Richard Serra: An Interview (with Serra, Michelson, and Clara Weyergraf, who made the film Steelmill/Stahlwerk with Serra), October 10 (Fall 1979). Reprinted in Richard Serra, Writings and Interviews (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994), 69.

See Richard SerraRailroad Turnbridge on UbuWeb:

ubu.com/film/serra_turnbridge.html

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MODERN SCULPTURE READER

The unofficial mascot for the fifth decennial Skulptur Projekte Münster—through October 1, 2017—is a cartoon of a man holding a drink and a cigarette exclaiming, “This shit rocks!” In the year of the previous exhibition, the Henry Moore Institute and its curator Penelope Curtis initiated and published the MODERN SCULPTURE READER (2007)—which quickly sold out and fell out of print.

Five years later, the J. Paul Getty Museum sponsored a second edition of this essential volume on twentieth-century sculpture, which includes:

Essays by Eva Hesse (“Contingency”), Apollinaire (“Duchamp–Villon”), Vito Acconci (“Notes on Vienna”), and Benjamin H. D. Buchloh (“Michael Asher and the Conclusion of Modern Sculpture”). Interviews with Louise Bourgeois, Robert Smithson, Rachel Whiteread, Bruce Nauman, and Richard Serra. Excerpts from longer pieces—Robert Irwin’s “Notes Toward Conditional Art,” Rilke on Rodin, Wilhelm Worringer on abstraction, Carl Einstein on African sculpture, and Allan Kaprow on assemblages and happenings.

The 70 texts—artists’ statements, newspaper and magazine articles, poems, transcribed lectures and interviews—are arranged chronologically, and edited by Jon Wood, David Hulks, and Alex Potts.

MODERN SCULPTURE READER (Leeds: Henry Moore Institute/Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2007 and 2012).

Claes OldenburgGiant Pool Balls—which was made for the first Skulptur Projekte Münster in 1977—covered with graffiti. Image credit: Rudolf Wakonigg/LWL, 1977/©1987 Skulptur Projekte Münster.

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