Tag Archives: Roni Horn

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Fourteen at-risk non-profit visual arts organizations in New York City—Artists Space, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Dia Art Foundation, the The Drawing CenterEl Museo del BarrioHigh Line Art, MoMA PS1, New Museum, Public Art Fund, Queens Museum, Sculpture Center, the The Studio Museum in Harlem, Swiss Institute, and White Columns—will benefit from the sale of artwork made available as part of the Hauser & Wirth initiative ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK.

Two non-profit charitable partners are also supported: The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts (FCA).

Located at the gallery’s two New York locations and online, more than 100 artists are participating in the project, including Rita Ackermann, Kelly Akashi, Ida Applebroog, Genesis Belanger, Lynda Benglis, Katherine Bernhardt, Huma Bhabha, Carol Bove, Katherine Bradford, Sam Falls, Charles Gaines, Maureen Gallace, Joanne Greenbaum, Mona Hatoum, Mary Heilmann, Camille Henrot, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Shara Hughes, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Sanya Kantarovsky, June Leaf, Simone Leigh, Zoe Leonard, Glenn Ligon, Sam McKinniss, Marilyn Minter, Sarah Morris, Angel Otero, Adam Pendleton, Elizabeth Peyton, Jack Pierson, R.H. Quaytman, Deborah Roberts, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Tschabalala Self, Amy Sherald, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Laurie Simmons, Taryn Simon, Lorna Simpson, Avery Singer, Sarah Sze, Kara Walker, Mary Weatherford, and the estate of Anne Truitt.

See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Through October 22.

Hauser & Wirth

548 West 22nd Street, New York City.

32 East 69th Street, New York City.

From top: Lorna Simpson, Haze, 2019, ink and screenprint on gessoed fiberglass, photograph by James Wang, image courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth; Kelly Akashi, Feel Me (Flesh), 2020, hand-blown glass and bronze, image courtesy and © the artist, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and François Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles; Mary Weatherford, Meeting in the Forest, 2019, flashe and neon on linen, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen Studio, image courtesy and © the artist, David Kordansky Gallery, and Gagosian; Rashid Johnson, Standing Broken Men, 2020, ceramic tile, mirror tile, spray enamel, oil soap, black stick, wax, photograph by Martin Parsekian, image courtesy and © the artist; Jack Pierson, Inquire Within, 2020, metal and wood, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Angel Otero, Sleepy Fire, 2020, oil paint and fabric collaged on canvas, image courtesy and © Lehmann Maupin; Jenny Holzer, from Survival (1983–85), 2020, photograph by Graham Kelman, image courtesy and © the artist and Artist Rights Society (ARS).


RONI HORN IN CONVERSATION

Roni Horn and LACMA director Michael Govan—in conjunction with the museum’s View From Here program—will discuss how “recently acquired artworks…function historically in an encyclopedic collection, and how they provide us with a window into the challenges and joys of art making.”*

To r.s.v.p. for the online conversation, see link below.

VIEW FROM HERE—RONI HORN and MICHAEL GOVAN

LACMA

Friday, October 9.

Noon on the West Coast; 3 pm East Coast.

Roni Horn. Images courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth.


URSULA HAUSER

Origin stories are essential to Ursula Hauser. Growing up in St. Gallen, Switzerland, she co-founded and directed her family’s appliance business in the city. Although she initially felt a stronger connection to modern architecture than contemporary art, she started buying works by Swiss artists in the 1960s.

“They came and went in our house. And it’s still that way with our artists. We would meet on weekends or were invited to birthdays. To me, support means acquiring something an artist has made. In the mid-1980s, I set up my own showrooms in the abandoned Rohner Textile factory in Flawil: Galerie Arte Nuova. Actually it wasn’t a gallery; I just wanted to give local artists a platform.” — Ursula Hauser*

Hauser—who co-founded Hauser & Wirth in 1992 in Zürich with her future son-in-law Iwan Wirth and daughter Manuela—has remained personal friends with many of the artists whose work she collects, always availing herself of the opportunity to spend time with them in their studios, talking through their process. The new publication THE INNER MIRROR: CONVERSATIONS WITH URSULA HAUSER, ART COLLECTOR—a beautifully illustrated book-length interview between Hauser, Laura Bechter, and Michaela Unterdörfer—is the story of this exchange.

“In the big American studios… you make contact, introduce yourself, or maybe you’ve bought a work, so there’s already a connection. And then you take a very tentative approach, proceed step-by-step, depending on whether the chemistry is there. As a rule, you’ve already met at an exhibition, in a gallery, or in a museum. And finally you peer into all the corners.”*

Whether discovering SoHo in the 1990s with Iwan Wirth, celebrating Parkett’s tenth anniversary with Bice Curiger and Jacqueline Burckhardt, trading cars with Jason Rhoades in Los Angeles, or discovering drawings by Ida Applebroog in the artist’s cabinet drawers, THE INNER MIRROR is a private view into the life and work of this key art world figure. For Hauser, the book’s title refers to something women were seldom afforded the luxury of revealing, something Hauser found through art.

“Women who support a family and have to survive—it doesn’t occur to anyone that they might have personal feelings. You simply have to fight, it’s a struggle, and you have no choice but to make something good, something better out of it… Louise Bourgeois’ work is like a mirror of humanity. For people of my generation, it was impossible to let on that you were vulnerable. You would never reveal the reflections on your inner mirror. That was a sign of weakness and then you would have been lost. And that’s exactly what Louise’s work shows. Her art creates a space where that can be expressed.”*

The works in the Ursula Hauser Collection stay with her—she’s held on to drawings and models by Paul McCarthy for years—and Hauser collaborates with the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen on exhibitions of the collection. This summer in southwest England, the show UNCONSCIOUS LANDSCAPE—WORKS FROM THE URSULA HAUSER COLLECTION—curated by Manuela Wirth and Laura Bechter—brings together sixty-five works by the women who have drawn Hauser’s eye over the last four decades.

*THE INNER MIRROR—CONVERSATIONS WITH URSULA HAUSER, ART COLLECTOR, edited by Laura Bechter and Michaela Unterdörfer (Zürich: Hauser & Wirth, 2019).

UNCONSCIOUS LANDSCAPE—WORKS FROM THE URSULA HAUSER COLLECTION

Through September 8.

Hauser & Wirth Somerset

Durslade Farm, Dropping Lane, Bruton, Somerset.

From top: Loredana Sperini, Untitled, 2012, wax, cement, and pigment, photograph by Sebastian Stadler; Maria Lassnig, Die rasende Grossmutter (The Racing Grandmother), 1963, © Maria Lassnig Foundation; Berlinde De Bruyckere, Piëta, 2008, wax, epoxy, metal, and wood; Carol Rama, Ostentazione, 2002, mixed media and oil on paper on canvas, courtesy Achivio Carol Rama, Turin, photograph by Thomas Bruns Fotograf; Alina Szapocznikow, Stela (Stéle), 1968, polyester resin and polyurethane foam, photograph by Stefan Altenburger Photography Zürich, © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London, 2019; Roni Horn, Untitled, No. 2, 1999, two Iris-printed photographs on Somerset paper; Phyllida Barlow, untitled: awnings 4 (yellow), 2013, acrylic on watercolor paper; Eva Hesse, H + H, 1965, varnish, ink, gouache, enamel, cord, metal found object (wood), paper-caché, unknown modeling compound, particle board, wood, © Estate of Eva Hesse; Meret Oppenheim, Pelzhandschuhe (Fur Gloves with Wooden Fingers), 1936, fur gloves, wooden fingers, and nail polish; Louise Bourgeois, The Good Mother (Topiary) , 1999, steel, ceramic beads, wood, wire, and cloth; Sylvia Sleigh, Working at Home, 1969, oil on canvas, photograph by Stefan Altenburger Photography Zürich; Sheila Hicks, Pigment Sticks, 2015, bamboo sticks with pigmented synthetic fibers for bas-relief, photograph by Andrea Rossetti; Heidi Bucher, Die Quelle (The Source), 1987, vase, metal, textile, glue, and color, installation view at Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art, London, 2018, © Estate of Heidi Bucher. Images courtesy and © the artists and the Ursula Hauser Collection Archive.