Tag Archives: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art SFMOMA

JACOLBY SATTERWHITE AND LEGACY RUSSELL

As part of the Frieze Art and Fashion Summit in New York, Jacolby Satterwhite will join Studio Museum associate curator Legacy Russell for “Self and Subjectivity—Breaking the Confines of Identity,” a discussion about Satterwhite’s focus on “power, politics, and a dystopian future.”* 

JACOLBY SATTERWHITE and LEGACY RUSSELL

FRIEZE ART AND FASHION SUMMIT

Tuesday, April 30, at 10:20 am.

The New School, Parsons

Tishman Auditorium

63 Fifth Avenue, New York City.

From top: Jacolby Satterwhite, photograph by Frank Sun, courtesy the artist, the photographer, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Jacolby Satterwhite, En Plein Air: Abduction I, 2014, courtesy of the artist and Morán Morán; Legacy Russell, photograph by Daniel Dorsa, courtesy of the writer and the photographer.

SUZANNE LACY — WE ARE HERE

Art as activist public practice—and vice versa—has defined the work of Suzanne Lacy from the start.

The exhibitions and programs that make up WE ARE HERE—the Lacy retrospective co-organized by YBCA and SFMOMA—bring her collaborative, choreographed projects to a new generation.

The Yerba Buena section will “celebrate the rich legacy of youth work in the Bay Area through an in-depth focus on The Oakland Projects (1991–2001)—a series on youth empowerment, media education, and policy—presented alongside works by contemporary artists, and youth arts and activist organizations.”*

At SFMOMA, “visitors can explore Lacy’s entire career, from her earliest feminist work to her latest immersive video installations. Several projects on view honor the voices and contributions of women to public life.”*

SUZANNE LACY—WE ARE HERE*

Through August 4.

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

701 Mission Street, San Francisco.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

151 Third Street, San Francisco.

From top: Suzanne Lacy, Anatomy Lesson #4: Swimming, 1977 (detail), photograph by Rob Blalack; Suzanne Lacy, Annice Jacoby, and Chris JohnsonThe Roof Is on Fire (1993–94), from The Oakland Projects (1991–2001), performance, June 4, 1994, City Center West Garage, Oakland, photograph by Nathan Bennett; Suzanne Lacy, Three Weeks in May, 1977, partial re-enactment at Museo Pecci Milan, 2014; Suzanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz, In Mourning and in Rage, 1977, performance, December 13, 1977, Los Angeles City Hall, photograph by Maria Karras; Suzanne Lacy with Raul Vega, Anyang Women’s Agenda, 2010, photograph by Vega; Suzanne Lacy with Cecilia Barriga, Tattooed Skeleton, 2010, produced by Berta Sichel for the Museo Reina Sofia. Images © Suzanne Lacy, courtesy of Lacy, her collaborators, and the photographers.

ROBERT KENNEDY’S LAST JOURNEY

“Most of us hide most of the time. We don’t want people aware of what we are feeling. But that day, very few people were hiding. It was a consistent wave of emotion without interruption.” — Paul Fusco

THE TRAINRFK’S LAST JOURNEY—a three-part exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art—documents the funeral train of Robert F. Kennedy as it traveled from New York City to Washington, D.C., for Kennedy’s burial at Arlington.

The first section features Paul Fusco’s photographs for Look magazine, taken from the train of the crowds—estimated at nearly one million—who lined the route. The second brings together photographs and home movies taken by members of the crowd of the passing train, collected by Rein Jelle Terpstra in his project The People’s View (2014–18). And lastly, the museum will screen the 70mm film June 8, 1968 (2010, directed by Philippe Parreno), a re-enactment of Fusco’s view from the train’s windows.

The exhibition was curated by Clément Chéroux and Linde Lehtinen.

 

THE TRAIN—RFK’S LAST JOURNEY, through June 10.

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, 151 Third Street, San Francisco.

sfmoma.org/exhibition/train

See: youtube.com/watch which includes a segment of RFK’s eulogy by Edward M. Kennedy at St. Patrick’s.

theguardian.com/philippe-parreno

pro.magnumphotos.com/Package

Image credit: Paul Fusco, © Paul Fusco/Magnum Photos.

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