Tag Archives: Semiotext(e)

ANDREA DWORKIN LAUNCH AT SKYLIGHT

Andrea Dworkin—second wave feminism’s most controversial figure—was embraced and disowned across the political spectrum.

“Reading her now, beyond the anti-porn intransigence she’s both reviled and revered for, one feels a prescient apocalyptic urgency, one perfectly calibrated, it seems, to the high stakes of our time. In the #MeToo era, women’s unsparing public testimony—in granular detail and dizzying quantity—is at the heart of a mainstream cultural reckoning with sexual violence and harassment. ” — Johanna Fateman, on Dworkin

A new collection of Dworkin’s writing—Last Days at Hot Slit, edited by Fateman and Amy Scholder, and published by Semiotext(e)—will launch this weekend at Skylight with readings by Ryka Aoki, Christina Catherine Martinez, Jibz Cameron (aka Dynasty Handbag), Anna Joy Springer, and Nao Bustamante.

JOHANNA FATEMEN and AMY SCHOLDER—LAST DAYS AT HOT SLIT launch

Sunday, April 7, at 5 pm.

Skylight Books

1818 North Vermont, Los Feliz, Los Angeles.

From top: Andrea Dworkin; book jacket image courtesy Semiotext(e); police mugshot from Dworkin’s arrest at an anti-war protest, New York City, 1965

JENNIFER DOYLE — LETTING GO

Jennifer Doyle—author of Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art and Campus Sex, Campus Security—will read from a work-in-progress: reflections on living with harassment.

 

JENNIFER DOYLE—LETTING GO

Sunday, January 6, at 6 pm.

Human Resources

410 Cottage Home Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Above image credit: Semiotext(e).

Below: Jennifer Doyle.

GARY INDIANA IN LOS ANGELES

“In 1985, the Village Voice offered me a job as senior art critic. This made my life easier and lousy at the same time. I now had to actually enter all those galleries instead of peeking in the windows.” — Gary IndianaVile Days

Indiana’s art reviews for the Voice—collected and republished as Vile Days: The Village Voice Art Columns, 1985–1988—combine “his novelistic and theatrical gifts with a startling political acumen to assess art and the unruly environments that give it context.”

Indiana will give this week’s graduate art lecture at ArtCenter’s Hillside Campus.

In mid-January he will read from Vile Days and present the Michael Haneke film Happy End (2017) at a Hard to Read event in West Hollywood.

 

GARY INDIANA ON VILE DAYS

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30 pm.

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

 

GARY INDIANA AT HARD TO READ

Tuesday, January 15, at 7 pm.

Standard Hotel

8300 Sunset Boulevard, West Hollywood.

 

See ArtCenter Talks: Graduate Seminar, The First Decade 1986–1995, Stan Douglas, ed. (New York: David Zwirner Books/Pasadena, CA: ArtCenter Graduate Press, 2016).

Image credit above: Semiotext(e).

Below: Gary Indiana. Photograph by Hedi El Kholti, courtesy El Kholti and Indiana.

WEIGHT OF THE EARTH

WEIGHT OF THE EARTH—THE TAPE JOURNALS OF DAVID WOJNAROWICZ is a collection of “audio journals that document Wojnarowicz’s turbulent attempts to understand his anxieties and passions, tracking his thoughts as they develop in real time.”*

Artforum editor David Velasco has written an introduction for book, out now from Semiotext(e).

WEIGHT OF THE EARTH—THE TAPE JOURNALS OF DAVID WOJNAROWICZ, edited by Lisa Darms and David O’Neill (South Pasadena, CA: Semiotext(e), 2018).*

Top: Andreas SterzingDavid Wojnarowicz and Peter Hujar at an opening at Civilian Warfare Gallery in the East Village, 1983.

Above: David Wojnarowicz, Jean Genet Masturbating in Metteray Prison, 1983.

Below: Wojnarowicz.

WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS’ THANKSGIVING

“Thanks for the American dream

To vulgarize and falsify until

The bare lies shine through… ”

William S. Burroughs’ poem “Thanksgiving Day, November 28, 1986”—a pocket history of the land of the free—has had particular resonance since the election of 2016.

The 1991 short of Burroughs reading A THANKSGIVING PRAYER was directed by Gus Van Sant.

Also see:

Burroughs Live—The Collected Interviews of William S. Burroughs, 1960–1997, edited by Sylvère Lotringer (Los Angeles: Semiotext(e), 2001).

Above image credit: Semiotext(e).

Below: Gus Van Sant, A Thanksgiving Prayer.