Tag Archives: Simone Leigh

SIMONE LEIGH AND SAIDIYA HARTMAN IN CONVERSATION

Join Simone Leigh and Saidiya Hartman—author of the acclaimed new study Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Social Upheaval—for a Frieze Talk this week in New York.

“[Hartman’s] work has always examined the great erasures and silences—the lost and suppressed stories of the Middle Passage, of slavery and its long reverberations. Her rigor and restraint give her writing its distinctive electricity and tension. Hartman is a sleuth of the archive.” — Parul Sehgal

SIMONE LEIGH and SAIDIYA HARTMAN in conversation

FRIEZE NEW YORK

Friday, May 3, at noon.

Randall’s Island Park, New York City.

SIMONE LEIGH—LOOPHOLE OF RETREAT

Through October 27.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top: Saidiya Hartman (left) and Simone Leigh, courtesy of the author and artist; Leigh with Brick House—her High Line Plinth work—in process, photograph by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of the artist and the photographer; Hartman book cover courtesy W.W. Norton & Company.

LOOPHOLE OF RETREAT

Okwui Okpokwasili, Françoise Vergès, Lorraine O’Grady, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, and Dionne Brand are among the many artists, authors, and educators who will be at the Guggenheim this weekend for the LOOPHOLE OF RETREAT conference.

This “daylong gathering dedicated to the intellectual life of black women” was organized by Simone Leigh, Tina Campt, and Saidiya Hartman, author of Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments.

LOOPHOLE OF RETREAT—A CONFERENCE

Saturday, April 27, from 1 pm.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

The name of the conference—and Leigh’s concurrent show at the museum—refers to a chapter title in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs, who referred to the opening line of the poem “The Task” (1784) by William Cowper.

From top: Okwui Okpokwasili (left), Poor People’s TV Room, 2017, courtesy of the artist; Lorraine O’Grady, Art Is. . . (Girl Pointing), 1983/2009, chromogenic color print, courtesy of the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York, © 2015 Lorraine O’Grady, Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York); Simone Leigh with a wax mold of a braid for the High Line Plinth piece Brick House, at Stratton Sculpture Studios in Philadelphia, photograph by Constance Mensh. Brick House will be on view in Manhattan from June 2019.

SCULPTURE — LUHRING AUGUSTINE

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Sculptures by Rachel WhitereadGlenn Ligon, Christopher Wool, Simone Leigh, Oscar Tuazon, Reinhard Mucha, Tunga, Janine Antoni, Tom Friedman, Roger Hiorns, Phillip King, Martin Kippenberger, Jeremy Moon, Reinhard Mucha, Cady Noland, and Steve Wolfe are now on view at both New York locations of Luhring Augustine.

 

SCULPTURE, through April 14 in Chelsea, and May in Bushwick.

LUHRING AUGUSTINE, 531 West 24th Street, New York City.

LUHRING AUGUSTINE BUSHWICK, 25 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brooklyn.

luhringaugustine.com

luhringaugustine.com/sculpture/press-release

From top: Works by Glenn Ligon, Oscar Tuazon, and Rachel Whiteread. Image credit: Luhring Augustine.

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PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ

Peggy Cooper Cafritz—the Washington, D.C., collector of African-American art, salonist, activist, fundraiser, co-founder of the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, and just-published author—died last week in the capital.

Her 2018 book FIRED UP! READY TO GO!—FINDING BEAUTY, DEMANDING EQUITY brings together images of more than 200 works of art that were lost in a 2009 house fire, as well as the art Cooper Cafritz had collected in the years since the catastrophe.

The Cooper Cafritz collection includes pieces by Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Edward Mitchell Bannister, Alma Thomas, Norman Lewis, Kara Walker, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas, El Anatsui, Yinka Shonibare, Nick Cave, Kehinde Wiley, Glenn Ligon, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae WeemsNoah Davis, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Titus KapharNjideka Akunyili Crosby, and Toyin Ojih Odutola.

PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ, FIRED UP! READY TO GO!—FINDING BEAUTY, DEMANDING EQUITY: AN AFRICAN AMERICAN LIFE IN ART, THE COLLECTIONS OF PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ (New York: Rizzoli , 2018).

Contributors to the book’s text include Thelma Golden, Simone Leigh, Uri McMillan, Jack ShainmanTschabalala Self.

From top: Torkwase Dyson, Strange Fruit (Blue Note), 2015, acrylic on board; Romare Bearden, Prince Cinque (Maquette), 1976, felt pen with watercolor and collage on graph paper; Jas Knight, Autumn, 2015, oil on linen; Loren Holland, The Messenger, 2005, oil on paper; Noah Davis, Black Widow, 2007, acrylic and gouache on canvas; Nina Chanel Abney, Untitled, 2012. All images © the artists, courtesy the Estate of Peggy Cooper Cafritz, and Rizzoli.

POWER AT SPRÜTH MAGERS

“The cultural contributions of women and women of color are still underrepresented in the art world, and we are still asked to contextualize our practice in ways that other privileged artists simply are not.” — Shinique Smith*

“I have recently been exploring the idea of doing my work in secret. I was inspired by discovering the work of The United Order of Tents. They are a secret society of black nurses. They have supported each other and done good works since the Civil War. The Mother Emmanuel Church met in secret for 35 years, while black churches were banned in South Carolina after the Nat Turner rebellion.

“I don’t really have time to explain my work to people who feel that I have an identity and they don’t. I don’t have time to unpack all that. I’m focused on using black feminist theory or any other tools that can help me sharpen my knife, and make better work.” — Simone Leigh*

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, a survey of over 60 works by 37 artists—including Ellen Gallagher, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Betye Saar, Ntozake ShangeMickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, and Carrie Mae Weems—is now on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles.

The exhibition, curated by Todd Levin, also includes a selection of images from the Ralph DeLuca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography.

 

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, through June 10.

SPRÜTH MAGERS, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

*Artists’ quotes from Power, the booklet published on the occasion of the exhibition:

spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/445

ALSO SEE: theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/apr/05/kara-walker-karon-davis-power-black-female-artists

The participating artists: Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Sonya Clark, Renee Cox, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Karon Davis, Minnie Evans, Nona Faustine, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ellen Gallagher, Leslie Hewitt, Clementine Hunter, Steffani Jemison, Jennie C. Jones, Simone Leigh, Julie Mehretu, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Sondra Perry, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Joyce J. Scott, Emmer Sewell, Ntozake Shange, Xaviera Simmons, Lorna Simpson, Shinique Smith, Renee Stout, Mickalene Thomas, Alma Woodsey Thomas, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Kara Walker, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Carrie Mae Weems, and Brenna Youngblood.

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014 Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood 243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm 96 x 20 x 20 inches Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014
Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood
243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
96 x 20 x 20 inches
Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers