Tag Archives: Solomon R Guggenheim Museum

MAPPLETHORPE TUESDAYS

In conjunction with the exhibition IMPLICIT TENSIONS—MAPPLETHORPE NOW, the Guggenheim presents a series of Robert Mapplethorpe screenings every Tuesday in February, beginning with a documentary featuring Mapplethorpe’s patron and lover Sam Wagstaff.

BLACK WHITE + GRAY—A PORTRAIT OF SAM WAGSTAFF AND ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE

Tuesday, February 5, at 6 pm.

ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE, NO. 61 FROM THE SERIES ART/NEW YORK

Tuesday, February 12, at 6 pm.

MAPPLETHORPE—LOOK AT THE PICTURES

Tuesday, February 19 and 26, at 6 pm

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top: Norman Seeff photograph of Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe; Marcus Leatherdale photograph of Mapplethorpe; Sam Wagstaff and Mapplethorpe, portrait by Francesco Scavullo, image courtesy of Sean Byrnes, the Scavullo Foundation, and the Motion Picture Group, Inc., Philadelphia.

CALEB TEICHER AND CONRAD TAO — MORE FOREVER

MORE FOREVER—a new dance collaboration between Caleb Teicher and composer-pianist Conrad Tao—will be performed three times next week in New York.

MORE FORVER

CALEB TEICHER & CO. WITH CONRAD TAO

Sunday, January 6, at 3 pm and 7:30 pm.

Monday, January 7, at 7:30 pm.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top: Caleb Teicher (left) and Conrad Tao, photograph by Em Watson; More Forever; Tao and Teicher. Images courtesy the artists.

A LUTA CONTINUA

The collection of Sylvio Perlstein comprises twentieth-century art movements—from Dada and Surrealism to Abstraction, Land Art, Conceptual Art, Minimal Art, Pop Art, Op Art, Arte Povera, Nouveau Réalisme, Conceptualism, and Contemporary Art—as well as a “collection within the collection” of photography.

The catalogue A LUTA CONTINUA—THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION is out now, and includes essays by Luc Sante, Matthieu Humery, and curator David Rosenberg.

A LUTA CONTINUA—THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION: ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY FROM DADA TO NOW

(Zürich: Hauser & Wirth Publishers, 2018).

From top:

Barbara KrugerUntitled (Busy going crazy)1989. Courtesy the artist.

Vanessa Beecroft, Untitled (performance, detail, Solomon R. Gugghenheim Museum, New York), 1998.

Eugène AtgetBoulevard de la Villette 122, 1924 – 1925. Matte albumen silver print.

Man RayThe Bald Patch, 1919. Silver Print. © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

THE GUGGENHEIM SIX

Peggy Guggenheim insisted that her collection remain intact in Venice every year between Easter and November 1st, the period when Venice receives its greatest number of visitors, and which coincides with the biennale. But this summer, key artwork from Peggy’s holdings are at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, where they join works collected by the original contributors to the Guggenheim Foundation—artist and curator Katherine Dreier, dealer Karl Nierendorf, artist Hilla Rebay, gallerist Justin K. Thannhauser, and industrialist Solomon Guggenheim—in VISIONARIES: CREATING A MODERN GUGGENHEIM.

BrâncușiPissarro, Duchamp, Picasso, Calder, Klee, Mondrian, and Pollock are all represented, with a special emphasis on the work of Kandinsky.

VISIONARIES: CREATING A MODERN GUGGENHEIM, through September 6.

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 88th Street, New York City.

guggenheim.org/exhibition/visionaries-creating-a-modern-guggenheim

Upper two: Exhibition catalogue, edited by Megan Fontanella; and Oskar Fischinger, Untitled, 1942. Image credit: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Bottom: Peggy Guggenheim.

20147-visionaries-front_1

 

Peggy Guggenheim- Art Addict

Peggy-Guggenheim-Art-Addict

POLLOCK’S ALCHEMY

ALCHEMY (1947), by Jackson Pollock, has not been seen in the United States for nearly half a century. Now on loan from the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, ALCHEMY is on view at the Guggenheim in New York through September 6, 2017.

This exhibition utilizes “three-dimensional imaging, elemental mapping, x-radiography, and nondestructive analytical techniques to identify the painting’s pigments and binders,” allowing visitors to “comprehend the physical properties of materials Pollock used to create ALCHEMY, and how he applied them to the canvas.”*

ALCHEMY, through September 6.

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 88th Street, New York City.

*guggenheim.org/artwork/3482

Jackson Pollock, Alchemy (1947), Oil, aluminum, alkyd enamel paint with sand, pebbles, fibers, and wood on canvas.

Image credit: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, Peggy Guggenheim Collection