Tag Archives: Sprüth Magers Los Angeles

ERIC FISCHL AND STEPHEN SHORE IN CONVERSATION

On the occasion of Eric Fischl’s first local gallery exhibition of new paintings in twenty-five years and Stephen Shore’s first Los Angeles show in nearly fifteen, Sprüth Magers presents the artists in conversation with LACMA curator Britt Salvesen.

Fischl’s COMPLICATIONS FROM AN ALREADY UNFULFILLED LIFE and Shore’s eponymous show are both on view at the gallery through the end of August.

ERIC FISCHL, STEPHEN SHORE, and BRITT SALVESEN in conversation

Wednesday, June 19, at 7 pm.

Sprüth Magers

5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Stephen Shore (2), Los Angeles, California, February 4, 1969, silver gelatin print, and New York, New York, March 11, 2018, printed 2019, pigment print; Eric Fischl (2), Untitled, 2018, and The Artist’s Assistant, 2018; Stephen Shore (2), Los Angeles, California, February 4, 1969, silver gelatin print, and Granite, Oklahoma, July 1972, printed 2012, chromogenic color print; Eric Fischl (2), The Exchange, 2018, and Promise of More to Come, 2019. Shore images © Stephen Shore, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York, and Sprüth Magers. Fischl images © Eric Fischl, courtesy Sprüth Magers.

BRIDGET RILEY — PAINTING NOW

“Painting Now” is the title and subject of a 1996 lecture by Bridget Riley advocating the continued—indeed, increasing—capacity and relevance of painting through all its evolutions.

A new retrospective exhibition of Riley’s work from the last sixty years borrows that title and is now on view.

 

BRIDGET RILEY—PAINTING NOW

Through January 26.

Sprüth Magers, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Michael Bracewell on Riley.

Above: Bridget Riley.

Below: Riley artwork courtesy the artist and Sprüth Magers.

ANALIA SABAN AT SPRÜTH MAGERS

The title of Los Angeles-based artist Analia Saban’s new exhibition at Sprüth Magers, Los AngelesFOLDS AND FAULTS—is based on Gilles Deleuze’s concept of an “origami universe” that is forever expanding and unfolding. Saban sculpts with cracked concrete and folds it like paper, and treats paintings like fabric weavings. The show also includes a selection of her laser-sculpted paper-on-ink panels.

ANALIA SABAN—FOLDS AND FAULTS, through August 19.

SPRÜTH MAGERS LOS ANGELES, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

A concurrent exhibition of Saban’s work, PIGMENTE, is also on view at Sprüth Magers, Berlin.

ANALIA SABAN—PIGMENTE, through September 2.

SPRÜTH MAGERS BERLIN, Oranianburger Strasse 18, Berlin

Los Angeles:  spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/446

Berlin:  spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/452

Top: Analia Saban, from Pigmente. Bottom: Analia Saban, from Folds and Faults (detail).

452


446

POWER AT SPRÜTH MAGERS

“The cultural contributions of women and women of color are still underrepresented in the art world, and we are still asked to contextualize our practice in ways that other privileged artists simply are not.” — Shinique Smith*

“I have recently been exploring the idea of doing my work in secret. I was inspired by discovering the work of The United Order of Tents. They are a secret society of black nurses. They have supported each other and done good works since the Civil War. The Mother Emmanuel Church met in secret for 35 years, while black churches were banned in South Carolina after the Nat Turner rebellion.

“I don’t really have time to explain my work to people who feel that I have an identity and they don’t. I don’t have time to unpack all that. I’m focused on using black feminist theory or any other tools that can help me sharpen my knife, and make better work.” — Simone Leigh*

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, a survey of over 60 works by 37 artists—including Ellen Gallagher, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Betye Saar, Ntozake ShangeMickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, and Carrie Mae Weems—is now on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles.

The exhibition, curated by Todd Levin, also includes a selection of images from the Ralph DeLuca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography.

 

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, through June 10.

SPRÜTH MAGERS, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

*Artists’ quotes from Power, the booklet published on the occasion of the exhibition:

spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/445

ALSO SEE: theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/apr/05/kara-walker-karon-davis-power-black-female-artists

The participating artists: Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Sonya Clark, Renee Cox, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Karon Davis, Minnie Evans, Nona Faustine, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ellen Gallagher, Leslie Hewitt, Clementine Hunter, Steffani Jemison, Jennie C. Jones, Simone Leigh, Julie Mehretu, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Sondra Perry, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Joyce J. Scott, Emmer Sewell, Ntozake Shange, Xaviera Simmons, Lorna Simpson, Shinique Smith, Renee Stout, Mickalene Thomas, Alma Woodsey Thomas, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Kara Walker, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Carrie Mae Weems, and Brenna Youngblood.

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014 Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood 243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm 96 x 20 x 20 inches Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014
Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood
243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
96 x 20 x 20 inches
Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers