Tag Archives: Sylvère Lotringer

AVENGERS AT GAGA AND REENA SPAULINGS

This is the closing week of AVENGERS—SOMEONE LEFT THE CAKE OUT IN THE RAIN, a group show at Gaga & Reena Spaulings Fine Art, Los Angeles.

The exhibition features photographs by Julie Becker and Reynaldo Rivera—including several from the Cha Cha Girls ’87 series—prints by Juliana Huxtable, Stephen Willats, and Felix Bernstein & Gabe Rubin, paintings by Jill Mulleady, Mayo Thompson, and Bedros Yeretzian & Nicole-Antonia Spagnola, multimedia works by Harry Dodge, Megan Plunkett, Matthew Langan-Peck, and Larry Johnson, and videos by Ken Okiishi and Gary Indiana.

In addition, Hedi El Kholti’s Collage sketchbook #10 is here, as well as ABC Pong, Bernadette Corporation’s table piece, featuring audio by Sylvère Lotringer.

On closing night the gallery will host a video program, with work by Alexander Kluge, Alex Hubbard, and exhibition artists Dodge, Huxtable, Indiana, and Spagnola.

 AVENGERS—SOMEONE LEFT THE CAKE OUT IN THE RAIN

Through Saturday, August 10.

Video program:

Saturday, August 10, at 8 pm.

Gaga & Reena Spaulings Fine Art

2228 W. 7th Street, 2nd Floor (entrance on South Grand View Street), Los Angeles.

Avengers—Someone Left the Cake Out in the Rain, 2019, from top: Matthew Langan-Peck, Untitled, 2019, digital C-print, wood, acrylic, oil paint; Mayo Thompson, Alligator & Turtle, 2019, gouache on canvas; installation view with Juliana Huxtable’s prints The Feminist Scam, 2017 (left) and The War on Proof, 2017, on wall and Bernadette Corporation’s ABC Pong in foreground; Megan Plunkett, The Encounter 01/The Prime Mover, 2019; installation view; Jill Mulleady, A Place in the Sun (Larry), 2019, oil on linen; Larry Johnson, Untitled (Century Schoolbook, Annotated), 1991, foamcore, photo mechanical transfer, rubber cement, ink, paint; installation view with Hedi El Kholti’s Collage sketchbook #10, 2015–2019, on stand; Mayo Thompson (2), Column and Bather, both 2019, gouache on canvas; Felix Bernstein & Gabe Rubin, Free Dissociation II, 2019, inkjet print; Reynaldo Rivera, Untitled (Fausto), inkjet print; installation view with four C-prints by Julie Becker from her The Same Room series; Felix Bernstein & Gabe Rubin, Free Dissociation I, 2019, inkjet print; Harry Dodge, The Gross Part (Stencil Series), 2015, plexiglass, primer, paint, UV-proof varnish, polished aluminum frame; Ken Okiishi, Being and/or Time, 2013–2016, HD video, 17 minutes, 15 seconds; Matthew Langan-Peck, J-U-, 2019, silkscreen on aluminum, wood,acrylic, oil paint, LED; installation view with Gary Indiana’s 2014 digital video Stanley Park on left. Images courtesy and © the artists and Gaga & Reena Spaulings Fine Art, Los Angeles. Special thanks to Jacob Eisenmann.

JEAN BAUDRILLARD AT CHÂTEAU SHATTO

A selection of the photographs of Jean BaudrillardTHE CONSPIRACY OF ART: PART I—is now on view at Château Shatto.

“It is not true that we need to believe in our own existence to live… Our consciousness is never in fact the echo of our own reality, of our existence in ‘real time,’ but rather the echo in delayed time, the dispersion screen of the subject and its identity. We are only distinguishable from ourselves in sleep, unconsciousness, and death. This consciousness, which is something altogether different than belief, comes more spontaneously from challenging reality, from siding with objective illusion than from objective reality. This challenge is more vital for our survival and for the survival of the species than the belief in reality and existence, which are spiritual consolations for use in another world.” — Jean Baudrillard*

JEAN BAUDRILLARD—THE CONSPIRACY OF ART: PART I

Through May 25.

Château Shatto

1206 Maple Avenue, Suite 1030, downtown Los Angeles.

*Jean Baudrillard, La Pensée radicale (Paris: Sens & Tonka, 1994); “Radical Thought,” in The Conspiracy of Art, edited by Sylvère Lotringer and translated by Ames Hodges (New York: Semiotext(e), 2005), 162–177.

From top: Jean Baudrillard, St. Clément II, 1988, front and reverse; Baudrillard.

DAVID WOJNAROWICZ AND BEN NEILL — ITSOFOMO

“In 1983, Ben Neill moved from Ohio to New York City. What was going on at the time in music was a very free improvisatory kind of style, a way of fusing different elements together through oppositions and similarities. The result was rather superficial. Ben was more interested in isolating some elements in order to produce a kind of deep resonance keeping each element separate, unexpected, untimely, a kind of creative chaos, in which the pieces clashed and resonated in the distance without ever being pinned down logically. It was the aesthetic of the collage. This is what attracted Ben to David Wojnarowicz’s work.

“With David you always got the feeling that the pieces weren’t randomly chosen; they made some kind of underlying structure that held the pieces together. There was something in his visual work that Ben was trying to do in a musical sense, putting together styles from different historical periods and contemporary forms, but always with the idea of creating some kind of larger by-product. It was very profound. So he called up David and he suggested that they do a collaborative piece at the Kitchen with him. And this was ITSOFOMO [In the Shadow of Forward Motion].

“In 1946 Antonin Artaud recorded a radio version of his famous text To Have Done with the Judgment of God. Directed by Artaud himself, this remarkable recording set shrieks and drumbeats inspired by the Tarahumara Indians against Artaud’s reading of a text about the mid-century American technology of war. War in a test tube, as the Virus of the Invisible, a destruction that is accomplished without bodily contact, spreading as seamlessly as the dream-transmission of primitive plagues.

“Fifty years later we are plagued by the invisible violence of a technology so accelerated that human life has come to a standstill. A globe cut up into cities of dead time. The texts that Wojnarowicz reads are an antidote to abstraction. Passionate, grounded, and dead precise, these texts violently reclaim the body by forcing us to experience the visceral reality of space and time. Set against Neill’s delicate, composed mutantrumpet, percussion, interactive electronics, and South American ethno-music, ITSOFOMO‘s forward motion becomes a battle to reclaim the organism of life.” — Sylvére Lotringer*

This weekend, Wojnarowicz and Neill’s multimedia performance piece ITSOFOMO will be restaged and performed by Neill and Don Yallech at KW Berlin.

ITSOFOMO (IN THE SHADOW OF FORWARD MOTION)

Friday, April 26, at 8 pm.

Saturday, April 27, at 6 pm.

KW Institute for Contemporary Art

KW Hall

Auguststrasse 69, Berlin.

*Sylvère Lotringer, in conjunction with the 1992 CD ITSOFOMO by David Wojnarowicz and Ben Neill, and included in the liner notes for the 2018 vinyl release by Jabs.

From top: David Wojnarowicz, ITSOFOMO, performance (1) and rehearsal (2, 3) at the Kitchen, 1989, photographs © Andreas Sterzing; Ben Neill (left) and Don Yallech perform ITSOFOMO at the Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018.

WOJNAROWICZ — LOTRINGER — SCEMAMA

Following a screening of DAVID WOJNAROWICZ—A CONVERSATION WITH SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER AND MARION SCEMAMA, Lotringer and Amy Scholder will join Hedi El Kholti for a conversation about Scemama’s film and Wojnarowicz’s life and work.*

The film intercuts footage from Lotringer‘s extensive 1989 interview with Wojnarowicz—itself filmed by Scemama—with documents from the artist’s estate and papers, and Scemama’s personal archives.

DAVID WOJNAROWICZ—A CONVERSATION WITH SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER AND MARION SCEMAMA

Tuesday, February 19, at 7:30 pm.

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

*At the recent Berlinale, the film screened under the title SELF-PORTRAIT IN 23 ROUNDS: A CHAPTER IN DAVID WOJNAROWICZ’S LIFE, 1989–1991.

David Wojnarowicz. Images courtesy Marion Scemama.

PIERRE GUYOTAT AND CHRISTOPH VON WEYHE

On the opening weekend of Pierre Guyotat and Christoph von Weyhe’s exhibition SCENES AND STAGES, The Box presents a conversation with the artists, followed by the panel PIERRE GUYOTAT IN LOS ANGELES with Sylvère Lotringer, Paul McCarthy, Ariana Reines, and Noura Wedell.

PIERRE GUYOTAT AND CHRISTOPH VON WEYHE—SCENES AND STAGES

Through March 30.

PIERRE GUYOTAT AND CHRISTOPH VON WEYHE IN CONVERSATION

PIERRE GUYOTAT IN LOS ANGELES panel

Sunday, February 3, from 1 pm to 4 pm.

The Box

805 Traction Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Pierre Guyotat, Untitled, pen and colored pencil on graph paper; Christoph von Weyhe, 7.3.2009, 2009, acrylic on canvas, photograph by Laurence Godart; Pierre Guyotat, Untitled, 2017, pen, colored pencil, gouache, pastel, graphite on paper. Images courtesy the artists and The Box.