Tag Archives: Tacita Dean

ADÈS, MCGREGOR, AND DEAN — WORLD PREMIERES

This weekend at the Music Center, choreographer Wayne McGregor, composer and conductor Thomas Adès, artist Tacita Dean, the Royal Ballet, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic present two world premieres, preceded by a work—OUTLIER—new to West Coast audiences.

LIVING ARCHIVE: AN AI PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENT—danced by Company Wayne McGregor—is a first look at the results of McGregor’s collaboration with Google’s Arts and Culture Lab to develop a choreographic tool that generates new outcomes for works in McGregor’s repertoire. This iteration of LIVING ARCHIVE will be danced to Adès’ In Seven Days, performed by the LA Phil.

The evening will close with the dance world premiere of Part One of McGregor’s full-evening work THE DANTE PROJECT. Set to Adès’ new eponymous composition, INFERNO will be performed by the Royal Ballet, and features a set designed by Tacita Dean—her first work for dancers and the stage—and lighting design by Lucy Carter and Simon Bennison.

ADÈS AND MCGREGOR—A DANCE COLLABORATION

OUTLIER, LIVING ARCHIVE: AN AI PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENT, and THE DANTE PROJECT PART 1 (INFERNO)

Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13, at 7:30 pm.

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

135 North Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Wayne McGregor, The Dante Project (Inferno), featuring Royal Ballet dancers Fumi Kaneko and Edward Watson; Watson and company; Calvin Richardson; artists of the Royal Ballet. Wayne McGregor, Living Archive, featuring Company Wayne McGregor dancers Izzac Carroll, Maria Daniela Gonzalez, and Jordan James Bridge; Chien-Shun Liao; Carroll; Rebecca Bassett-Graham and Carroll. Wayne McGregor, Outlier, artists of Company Wayne McGregor; Lauren Cuthbertson, Jacob O’Connell, and Joshua Barwick; Gonzalez, O’Connell, and Bassett-Graham. Photographs by Cheryl Mann, July 12, 2019, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Images courtesy and © Wayne McGregor, Tacita Dean, the Royal Ballet, the Music Center, the photographer, and the performers.

PARKETT — PHOTO

Parkett presents PHOTO, “the first survey exhibition of all photographic works made by artists for the journal over the last three decades. On view at Parkett’s Zurich space, the show includes some ninety works spanning a rarely seen, vast, and diverse range of photographic positions and ideas.”*

“The exhibition follows the evolution of photographic methods in the past three decades, with many of the earlier photographs making use of analog techniques, while digital editing informs the more recent works. Common threads including people and portraiture, landscapes both urban and natural, everyday objects, and abstraction, connect an otherwise expansive range of visual topics.”*

“Many of the works on view combine photographic elements with other media, such as gouache, collage, textiles, installation, or printmaking. Also on view are works, which while similar in terms of media and format, are unique and contain distinct differences within each project. Further exhibition displays include five video works, as well as a selection of artists’ inserts—the specially commissioned 10–12 book page projects published in each issue of Parkett.”*

“You can grab an issue from thirty years ago and see the context. You can grab that context and time. The internet has no historical orientation. You click on an article and you don’t know what context [it was published in]. I think this loss of memory is deplorable.” — Jacqueline Burckhardt, Parkett co-founding editor**

PHOTO

THE FIRST SURVEY OF ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS MADE BY ARTISTS FOR PARKETT SINCE 1984*

Through September 28.

Parkett Space Zürich

Limmatstrasse 268, Zürich.

**See “Time, Context, Object—The Parkett Story,” PARIS LA 16 (2018).

PHOTO artists include: Tomma Abts, Franz Ackermann, Doug Aitken, Allora/Calzadilla, Francis Alys, Ed Atkins, John Baldessari, Yto Barrada, Vanessa Beecroft, Alighiero e Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Glenn Brown, Angela Bulloch, Maurizio Cattelan, Chuck Close, Tacita Dean, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Trisha Donnelly, Tracey Emin, Omer Fast, Robert Frank, Katharina Fritsch, Cyprien Gaillard, Ellen Gallagher, Adrian Ghenie, Gilbert & George, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Andreas Gursky, David Hammons, Rachel Harrison, Christian Jankowski, Annette Kelm, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Jannis Kounellis, Lee Kit, Zoe Leonard, Liu Xiaodong, Paul McCarthy, Marilyn Minter, Tracey Moffatt, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Bruce Nauman, Gabriel Orozco, Richard Phillips, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, RH Quaytman, Charles Ray, Jason Rhoades, Pipilotti Rist, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Thomas Ruff, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Gregor Schneider, Shirana Shahbazi, Cindy Sherman, Roman Signer, Dayanita Singh, Hito Steyerl, Beat Streuli, Thomas Struth, Sturtevant, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sam Taylor-Wood, Diana Thater, Rosemarie Trockel, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo, Charline von Heyl, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Wool, and Yang Fudong.

Parkett editions, from top: Doug Aitken, Decrease the Mass and Run like Hell, 1999, for Parkett 57; Vanessa Beecroft, untitled, 1999, for Parkett 56; Andy Warhol, untitled, 1987, for Parkett 12, 1987; David Hammons, Money Tree, 1992, for Parkett 31; Wolfgang Tillmans, Parkett edition 1992–1998, for Parkett 53; Trisha Donnelly, The Dashiell Delay, 2006 (2), for Parkett 77; Shirana Shahbazi, Composition with Mountain, 2014, for Parkett 94; Sigmar Polke, Desastres und andere bare Wunder, 1982–1984, for Parkett 2; Cindy Sherman, untitled, 1991, for Parkett 29; Jannis Kounellis, untitled, 1985, for Parkett 6; Tracey Emin, Self-Portrait, 12.11.01, for Parkett 63; Franz Ackermann, Peak Season, 2003, for Parkett 68. Images courtesy and © the artists and Parkett.


LUCY LIPPARD — TACITA DEAN — EDWARD RANNEY

“I was always pro-artist because I was well aware that what I knew about art I learned from artists—not from criticism… [Robert Smithson] went to Max’s Kansas City every other night, and he’d bring a question to be discussed; he’d come ready to talk. I was there rarely, but I love to argue, so I’d argue with him… I liked him, but I always said he was a more important writer than he was an artist, and that pissed him off—for good reason, I guess.” — Lucy Lippard*

Following a Getty Center screening of Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty and Charles and Ray Eames’s Powers of Ten—in conjunction with an exhibition on monumentalityTacita Dean, Edward Ranney, and writer-activist Lucy Lippard will talk about their engagement with land art.

“I’ve always liked what feels like the impossibility of writing about images, and I always welcome the chance to mess around with form in ways that try to address that… Writing parallel to art, or collaborating with it, is what I’ve been trying to do, and it’s certainly more fun than just acting alone.” — Lippard*

(Lippard and Ranney collaborated on the books Down Country and The Lines.)

MONUMENTALITY AND COSMIC SCALE

LUCY LIPPARD, TACITA DEAN, and EDWARD RANNEY

Saturday, March 9, at 2 pm.

Getty Center

Harold M. Williams Auditorium

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Lucy Lippard,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 288, 289, 302–303.

From top: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Lucy Lippard, from the series Art World, 1982, gelatin silver print, © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Studio International, July/August 1970; Tacita Dean, JG (offset) (detail), 2013, set of fourteen handmade offset prints, the Getty Research Institute, courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris, Frith Street Gallery, London, and Niels Borch Jensen Edition, Berlin and Copenhagen, © Tacita Dean; Edward Ranney, Ollantaytambo, Peru, 1975, © Edward Ranney, courtesy of the artist.

TACITA DEAN’S ANTIGONE

ANTIGONE (2018)—an hour-long, 35mm, twin-projected film featuring Stephen Dillane and poet Anne Carson—is the centerpiece of a new Tacita Dean exhibition at the Serralves Museum in Portugal, which includes the artist’s early cinematic works and her recent large-scale blackboard drawings.

TACITA DEAN

Through May 5.

Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art

Rua D. João de Castro, 210, Porto.

Tacita DeanAntigone, 2018. Courtesy of the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris, and Frith Street Gallery, London.

PARKETT’S TIME CAPSULE

Image result for tacita dean the green ray

The exhibition A TIME CAPSULE—WORKS MADE BY WOMEN FOR PARKETT, 1984–2017 will be up through July 21.

Image result for tacita dean the green ray

PARKETT EXHIBITION SPACE, Limmatstrasse 268, Zürich.

parkettart.com/time-capsule-at-parkett-space-zurich

“The Parkett Story,” an interview with Parkett founding editiors Jacqueline Burckhardt and Bice Curiger, will be published in the forthcoming print issue of PARIS LA.

Above: Tacita Dean, The Green Ray, 2001, front and reverse. Edition for Parkett 62.

Below: Nairy Baghramian, Maintainers, 2017. Edition for Parkett 100/101.

Image credit: Parkett.

Image result for nairy baghramian Maintainers

___________________________________________________

the-green-ray-tde-64-1458559682-100-ce0

the-green-ray-tde-64-1458559682-100-919

Copia-di-nb478_02Copia-di-nb478_02