Tag Archives: Thelma Golden

JORDAN CASTEEL — WITHIN REACH

JORDAN CASTEEL—WITHIN REACH—the exhibition catalog of the artist’s suspended solo show at the New Museum—is edited by Massimiliano Gioni, with a foreword by Lisa Phillips.

The volume includes texts by Dawoud Bey, Lauren Haynes, and Amanda Hunt, and features interviews by Thelma Golden and Gioni.

Jordan Casteel, from top: Shirley (Spa Boutique2Go), 2018, oil on canvas, Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College; Medinilla, Wanda and Annelise, 2019, oil on canvas; Benyam, 2018, oil on canvas, Komal Shah and Gaurav Garg collection;; Serwaa and Amoakohene, 2019, oil on canvas; exhibition catalog cover image courtesy and © the artist and the New Museum; Cansuela, 2019, oil on canvas; Miles and Jojo, 2015, oil on canvas, Lumpkin-Boccuzzi Family Collection; Lourdes and Karina, 2019, oil on canvas; Joe and Mozel (Pompette Wines), 2017, oil on canvas, private collection; Jenna, 2019, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York.

CHARLES GAINES IN CONVERSATION

When I went to graduate school in the 1960s… I was faced with a dilemma… I was surrounded by ideas about art that I couldn’t identify with. I couldn’t identify with the practice of trying to decide what to put in a painting using a kind of intuition. Or looking at a painting as a vehicle for self-expression. It’s not that I looked down on that, or that I thought it was such a bad idea. It’s just that I wasn’t working in a manner that required that kind of behavior… Then I ran into a person who told me about a couple of books, which I bought and read. One was by the art historian Henri Focillon [1881–1943], called The Life of Forms in Art [1934]. The other was a big picture book on Tantric Buddhist art by Ajit Mookerjee [1915–1990]. In those books I began to find things that made sense to me in terms of art production.

[Focillon] had a Platonic perspective, that form was synonymous with number, with mathematics, with structure. And he said that form had a life of its own, had its own reciprocal fitness, had its own autonomous exigency..

This sounds like the tenets of high modernism. I don’t think it followed those tenets in talking about some kind of tautology or self-referential or self-reflexive apparatus. I saw it as a general critique of expressionism, which was central to my problem. I didn’t feel connected with the objects I was making, because when I made them, I wasn’t convinced that there was any connection between my motive to make something and the thing that I made. It just seemed arbitrary to me. I would see painters laboring in front of a painting, trying to decide whether a corner should be red or blue. To me it didn’t make any difference. It could be red or blue, you know? How can they feel good about a judgment that they make? On what basis do they establish this connection? And for the life of me, I couldn’t figure it out.

Focillon gave me the idea that you’re ultimately not the author of the object. You’re more like a vehicle of this realization without an author. With Tantric art I saw visual representation of the same idea.Charles Gaines*

This weekend—in conjunction with his Hauser & Wirth exhibition CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS—join Gaines in conversation with Thelma Golden, Laura Owens, and Gary Simmons.

ARTIST TALK—CHARLES GAINES IN CONVERSATION with THELMA GOLDEN, LAURA OWENS, and GARY SIMMONS

Sunday, November 3, at 3 pm.

Hauser & Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

“Charles Gaines, January 31, 1995,” in ArtCenter Talks: Graduate Seminar, The First Decade 1986–1995, edited by Stan Douglas (New York: David Zwirner Books / Pasadena, CA: ArtCenter Graduate Press, 2016), 172–197.

See Gina Osterloh on Gaines’ Shadows series.

Charles Gaines—Palm Trees and Other Works, Hauser & Wirth, Los Angeles, September 14, 2019–January 5, 2020, photographs by Fredrik Nilsen. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographer, and Hauser & Wirth.

SOUL OF A NATION SYMPOSIUM

Thelma Golden and Kellie Jones—joined by CAAM‘s departing deputy director and chief curator Naima J. Keith—will participate in the first panel of the SOUL OF A NATION SYMPOSIUM at the Aratani Theatre in Little Tokyo.*

The symposium marks the opening day of the SOUL OF A NATION exhibition at The Broad. Panel 1—which runs from 10:35 am to 11:50 am—will turn on the subject “The Politics of Black Exhibitions.” UC Irvine associate professor Bridget R. Cooks will moderate.

For complete information on the day’s speakers and panels, see the link below.

SOUL OF A NATION SYMPOSIUM

Saturday, March 23, from 10 am to 5:30 pm.

Aratani Theatre

244 San Pedro Street, downtown Los Angeles.

*On April 1, 2019, Keith will join LACMA as the vice president of education and public programs.

From top: Betye Saar, Rainbow Mojo, 1972, acrylic painting on cut leather, courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, photograph by Robert Wedemeyer; Roy DeCarava, Mississippi freedom marcher, Washington, D.C., 1963, photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, courtesy Sherry DeCarava and the DeCarava Archives, © Roy DeCarava; Barkley L. Hendricks, Icon for My Man Superman (Superman Never Saved Any Black People — Bobby Seale), 1969, oil, acrylic and aluminum leaf on linen canvas, © Estate of Barkley L. Hendricks, courtesy of the artist’s estate and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Superman S–Shield © and ™ DC Comics, used with permission.

ON ROY DECARAVA

To celebrate the reissue of The Sweet Flypaper of Life—text by Langston Hughes, photographs by Roy DeCaravaThelma Golden will moderate a panel on the work and Harlem milieu of the late photographer.

Participants include writer A.D. Coleman, filmmaker Radiclani Clytus, professors Leslie Hewitt and John Stauffer, and photographer Hope Wurmfeld.

A RADICAL VISION

ROY DECARAVA’S THE SWEET FLYPAPER OF LIFE panel

Monday, October 29, from 6:30 pm to 8 pm.

Great Hall, Cooper Union, 7 East 7th Street, New York City.

Above: Roy DeCarava and Langston Hughes, The Sweet Flypaper of Life.

Below: Roy DeCarava, Woman walking above, New York, 1950.  © The Estate of Roy DeCarava, 2018. All rights reserved.

Images courtesy David Zwirner.

THELMA GOLDEN AND LORNA SIMPSON

SIMPSON LORNA with border
Lorna Simpson and Thelma Golden – the director and chief curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem – are holding court at the Underground Museum this week to discuss, among other things, the publication of LORNA SIMPSON COLLAGES, a new monograph published by Chronicle Books.
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THELMA GOLDEN and LORNA SIMPSON, Thursday, May 24, at 7 pm.

UNDERGROUND MUSEUM, West Washington, Los Angeles.

hauserwirth.com/lorna-simpson-thelma-golden-underground-museum

Thelma Golden (left) and Lorna Simpson at Hauser & Wirth, London, March 1, 2018. Image credit: Hauser & Wirth.

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