Tag Archives: Trisha Brown

DOUGLAS CRIMP

Douglas Crimp—art historian, essayist, educator, author (Before Pictures), editor (October, throughout the 1980s), curator (Pictures)—died this morning in New York City.

“[In Before Pictures] I was interested in putting together two aspects of my life that were fairly difficult to negotiate in my first decade in New York—my art-world self and my gay-world self—at a time when both those worlds were highly experimental. I experienced innovation, experimentation, and transformation in the queer world and the art world simultaneously but mostly separately. I had to figure out how to make my two worlds, if not cohere, at least not be absolutely in conflict. My hope for Before Pictures is that it will provide a ‘queer history’ of both these worlds by putting them in conversation. I expect it might change how we think of 1970s gay culture, which we know mostly from the work of historians who write about the flourishing of gay politics. It might also change how we think about the art world of the ’70s.

“I had several different motivations for writing the book. One is that, in my ACT UP days, I made a whole bunch of younger friends, people mostly twenty years younger than me. I experienced the extraordinary explosion of gay culture during the 1970s, but they didn’t. I talked about it, they asked me about it, and on a couple occasions people said, you should really write about the gay ’70s in New York. That is not only because of their interest in what I was saying but because we were all horrified by the new narrative that was being put in place by gay conservatives. This narrative held that the ’70s represented our immaturity, an immaturity that led inevitably to AIDS, which in turn made us grow up and mature, become good citizens who wanted to get married and settle down and behave ourselves. I opposed that narrative in all of my AIDS writing.” — Douglas Crimp, interview by Jarrett Earnest*

“It has always seemed to me, given what little I understand or have experienced of seeking sexual partners over the internet, that people not only advertise who they want to appear as, but also believe they truly know who they are and what they want. What I took from the gay liberation ethos was that we didn’t know who we were and we didn’t necessarily know what we wanted. Instead, we felt we should be open to everything, even things we thought we didn’t want, which might open you to partners of different races, to differently abled partners, and certainly to people with different sexual proclivities. I tried many things that frankly I was quite repelled by, but I was just being a good liberationist, thinking, ‘OK, I can’t say, No, I don’t do that, or That’s not who I am.’ I didn’t necessarily seek such things out a second time, but I often surprised myself. I guess that would be my question to you: How much do you surprise yourself?

“My experience of diversity and of racial discourses was all in my queer life, not in my art world life. The latter was a very white world, no question. There only began to be a consciousness about the paucity of women artists and numbers of black artists in the Whitney Biennials around that time. We’ve moved some from there. It was also the time when the Museo del Barrio was founded as a response to the lack of diversity in the mainstream art world. But I would have had to go pretty far afield from my own activities and experience to bring that stuff in. So it really came in terms of my other life, essentially. I experienced that as just one of the really big differences between the kind of people I knew in the art world and the kind of people I knew in the queer world…

“The interdisciplinary or hybrid quality of the memoir flows from that juxtaposition that started with the first chapter, in which I discuss what I call ‘my two first jobs,’ haute couture with Charles James and conceptual art with Daniel Buren at the Guggenheim; two seemingly incommensurate things, I use that sort of incommensurability throughout as a means through which to interrogate both sides. I do this in the chapter about [George] Balanchine and  [Jacques] Derrida, for example. The idea was that juxtaposing the gay world and the art world would unsettle the standard narratives of each and then come up with a different kind of history of both. I’m hoping that is what the book accomplishes. It’s a history of New York in the 70s, it’s a very personal history, but I think it is also a broader history.” — Douglas Crimp, interview by Malik Gaines**

See Crimp on Trisha Brown.

See David Velasco on Crimp.

*”Douglas Crimp with Jarrett Earnest,” Brooklyn Rail, 2016; reprinted in Jarrett Earnest, What it Means to Write About Art (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 102–118.

**”Conversations: Douglas Crimp and Malik Gaines,” Document 9 (Fall-Winter 2016): 130–133.

From top: Douglas Crimp in the 1970s; book covers, MIT Press (2); Crimp in his loft on Chambers Street, downtown Manhattan, circa 1975; book covers, MIT Press (2); Crimp (right) and Daniel S. Palmer in New York City, 2016, photograph by Katherine McMahon; book cover University of Chicago Press and Dancing Foxes Press; Pictures exhibition catalog, Artists Space, 1977. Images courtesy and © the author’s estate, the photographers, and the publishers.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER SYMPOSIUM

In one of the last programs in the Judson exhibition, the symposium JUDSON DANCE THEATER—A COLLECTIVE SPECULATION brings together artists, scholars, and critics for presentations, discussions, and sound improvisations.

Organized by MOMA, participants include Malik GainesAndré LepeckiFred Moten; K.J. Holmes and Ramsey AmeenMarina Rosenfeld with Eli Keszler and Greg FoxClare CroftBarbara ClausenGus Solomons Jr.; and Philip Corner with Daniel Goode, David Demnitz, Leyna Marika PapachPhoebe Neville, and Iris Brooks.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER—A COLLECTIVE SPECULATION

Sunday, January 27, from 2 pm to 6 pm.

MOMA P.S.1

22–25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens.

From top: Harold Edgerton, Gus Solomons, Dancer, 1960; Philip Corner and Phoebe Neville, photograph by Dawid LaskowskiSteve Paxton and Trisha Brown at Bennington College, 1980, photograph by Tylere Resch.

STEVE PAXTON AND DAVID VELASCO IN CONVERSATION

Join dancer-choreographer Steve Paxton and Artforum editor David Velasco on Thursday for a conversation following the 3 pm performance of STEVE PAXTON—PERFORMANCES BY STEPHEN PETRONIO COMPANY, part of the Judson Dance exhibition at MOMA.

STEVE PAXTON and DAVID VELASCO—

POST-PERFORMANCE ARTIST CONVERSATION

Thursday, December 13, at 4 pm.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Top: Trisha Brown and Steve Paxton.

Above: Yvonne Rainer and Paxton in Word Words, 1963. Photograph by Al Giese.

Below: Paxton (standing) and Robert Rauschenberg in Spring Training (1965). Photograph Ugo Mulas © Heirs of Ugo Mulas. All rights reserved.

WINTER DANCE AT REDCAT

This weekend, CalArts Winter Dance at Redcat takes an iconic turn with a presentation of works by revolutionaries Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, Trisha Brown, Rennie HarrisJiří Kylián, and Merce Cunningham, staged by dancers who carry deep histories of the choreographers’ practices and intentions.

Cunningham’s CANFIELD (1969) will be staged by his former company member Holley Farmer, Zollar’s SHELTER (1988) by fellow Urban Bush Women member Marjani Forté, and Brown’s SOLO OLOS (1976) by her former company member Samuel Wentz.

For CANFIELD, Ben Richter, Justin Scheid, and Davy Sumner will perform a score by Pauline Oliveros, and actor-vocalist Toritseju Danner and drummer Emilia Moscoso Borja will accompany SHELTER.

Kylián’s FALLING ANGELS is staged by Fiona Lummis, who danced with Nederlands Dans Theater in the 1989 premiere of the piece. Live percussion will be provided by drummers Brandon Carson, Katie Eikam, Jason Fragoso, and Kevin Good performing a composition by Steve Reich.

FACING MEKKA was choreographed in 2003 by Harris—whose new Lazarus for the Alvin Ailey company created a sensation in New York last week—and will be staged by Nina Flagg, a former member of Rennie Harris Puremovement.

CALARTS WINTER DANCE

Friday and Saturday, December 7 and 8, at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Facing Mekka, Rennie HarrisCanfield, Merce CunninghamShelter, Jawole Willa Jo ZollarSolo Olos, Trisha Brown; Falling AngelsJiří Kylián; and Facing Mekka. All images from the CalArts Winter Dance Concert, November 2018, at CalArts. Photographs by Rafael Hernandez, courtesy CalArts. Special thanks to Kelly Hargraves and Margaret Crane.

TRISHA BROWN

A year after moving outdoors for a series of site-specific pieces, the Trisha Brown Dance Company returns to the proscenium stage this week for seven performances of their late, great founder’s GROOVE AND COUNTERMOVE, GEOMETRY OF QUIET, and L’AMOUR AU THÉÂTRE, at the Joyce.

 

TRISHA BROWN DANCE COMPANY

Tuesday and Wednesday, December 12 and 13, at 7:30 pm.

Thursday and Friday, December 14 and 15, at 8 pm.

Saturday, December 16, at 2 pm and 8 pm.

Sunday, December 17, at 2 pm.

JOYCE THEATER, 175 Eighth Avenue (at 19th Street), New York City.

joyce.org/performances/trisha-brown-dance-company

See: roberttyree.net/trisha-brown-company

From top: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Groove and Countermove. Photograph by Stephanie Berger.

Trisha Brown, Water Motor (1978), a film by Babette Mangolte. Photo © Julieta Cervantes, 2011.

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