Tag Archives: Trisha Brown

JUDSON DANCE THEATER SYMPOSIUM

In one of the last programs in the Judson exhibition, the symposium JUDSON DANCE THEATER—A COLLECTIVE SPECULATION brings together artists, scholars, and critics for presentations, discussions, and sound improvisations.

Organized by MOMA, participants include Malik GainesAndré LepeckiFred Moten; K.J. Holmes and Ramsey AmeenMarina Rosenfeld with Eli Keszler and Greg FoxClare CroftBarbara ClausenGus Solomons Jr.; and Philip Corner with Daniel Goode, David Demnitz, Leyna Marika PapachPhoebe Neville, and Iris Brooks.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER—A COLLECTIVE SPECULATION

Sunday, January 27, from 2 pm to 6 pm.

MOMA P.S.1

22–25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens.

From top: Harold Edgerton, Gus Solomons, Dancer, 1960; Philip Corner and Phoebe Neville, photograph by Dawid LaskowskiSteve Paxton and Trisha Brown at Bennington College, 1980, photograph by Tylere Resch.

STEVE PAXTON AND DAVID VELASCO IN CONVERSATION

Join dancer-choreographer Steve Paxton and Artforum editor David Velasco on Thursday for a conversation following the 3 pm performance of STEVE PAXTON—PERFORMANCES BY STEPHEN PETRONIO COMPANY, part of the Judson Dance exhibition at MOMA.

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POST-PERFORMANCE ARTIST CONVERSATION

Thursday, December 13, at 4 pm.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Top: Trisha Brown and Steve Paxton.

Above: Yvonne Rainer and Paxton in Word Words, 1963. Photograph by Al Giese.

Below: Paxton (standing) and Robert Rauschenberg in Spring Training (1965). Photograph Ugo Mulas © Heirs of Ugo Mulas. All rights reserved.

WINTER DANCE AT REDCAT

This weekend, CalArts Winter Dance at Redcat takes an iconic turn with a presentation of works by revolutionaries Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, Trisha Brown, Rennie HarrisJiří Kylián, and Merce Cunningham, staged by dancers who carry deep histories of the choreographers’ practices and intentions.

Cunningham’s CANFIELD (1969) will be staged by his former company member Holley Farmer, Zollar’s SHELTER (1988) by fellow Urban Bush Women member Marjani Forté, and Brown’s SOLO OLOS (1976) by her former company member Samuel Wentz.

For CANFIELD, Ben Richter, Justin Scheid, and Davy Sumner will perform a score by Pauline Oliveros, and actor-vocalist Toritseju Danner and drummer Emilia Moscoso Borja will accompany SHELTER.

Kylián’s FALLING ANGELS is staged by Fiona Lummis, who danced with Nederlands Dans Theater in the 1989 premiere of the piece. Live percussion will be provided by drummers Brandon Carson, Katie Eikam, Jason Fragoso, and Kevin Good performing a composition by Steve Reich.

FACING MEKKA was choreographed in 2003 by Harris—whose new Lazarus for the Alvin Ailey company created a sensation in New York last week—and will be staged by Nina Flagg, a former member of Rennie Harris Puremovement.

CALARTS WINTER DANCE

Friday and Saturday, December 7 and 8, at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Facing Mekka, Rennie HarrisCanfield, Merce CunninghamShelter, Jawole Willa Jo ZollarSolo Olos, Trisha Brown; Falling AngelsJiří Kylián; and Facing Mekka. All images from the CalArts Winter Dance Concert, November 2018, at CalArts. Photographs by Rafael Hernandez, courtesy CalArts. Special thanks to Kelly Hargraves and Margaret Crane.

TRISHA BROWN

A year after moving outdoors for a series of site-specific pieces, the Trisha Brown Dance Company returns to the proscenium stage this week for seven performances of their late, great founder’s GROOVE AND COUNTERMOVE, GEOMETRY OF QUIET, and L’AMOUR AU THÉÂTRE, at the Joyce.

 

TRISHA BROWN DANCE COMPANY

Tuesday and Wednesday, December 12 and 13, at 7:30 pm.

Thursday and Friday, December 14 and 15, at 8 pm.

Saturday, December 16, at 2 pm and 8 pm.

Sunday, December 17, at 2 pm.

JOYCE THEATER, 175 Eighth Avenue (at 19th Street), New York City.

joyce.org/performances/trisha-brown-dance-company

See: roberttyree.net/trisha-brown-company

From top: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Groove and Countermove. Photograph by Stephanie Berger.

Trisha Brown, Water Motor (1978), a film by Babette Mangolte. Photo © Julieta Cervantes, 2011.

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EXHIBITION: CHARLES GAINES AT THE HAMMER

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989, the first museum exhibition of Gaines’s early conceptual serial work, opened last weekend at the Hammer Museum. In a highly informative walkthrough, Gaines and Studio Museum Harlem curator Naima J. Keith discussed the difficulty of producing beautiful and meaningful art absent of subjective expression.

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The exhibited series, produced while Gaines was living in Fresno and before he moved to Los Angeles to teach at CalArts, employ rigorously mathematical formulations to plot–and superimpose–the coordinates of photographs onto hand-drawn graph paper, as system he described as “aesthetic and functional at the same time.” Throughout the exhibition’s fifteen years, Gaines continued to create increasingly difficult systems for his work, moving from static subjects (trees) to human faces and eventually moving bodies, in a collaboration with Trisha Brown.

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“I was troubled by the problem of expressivity and the linkage of that to notions of self and identity, almost like the simple idea that a personal signature is an expression of the self, and this becomes extrapolated to an entire discipline like art,” said Gaines. “And I was troubled by it because I was painting but I couldn’t feel a relationship with the images that I produced as a painter, which were produced out of a kind of strategy production based upon subjective expression.”

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Gaines cited the writings of Henri Focillon and an early exposure to Eastern Tantric art as revealing the possibility of employing systems to create beautiful images without the influence of subjective expression. “I simply wanted to be able to articulate casually the way images are there, and demonstrate that even though I am operating in a deterministic, mimetic system, subjectivity is suppressed but the poetic relationship with the work isn’t suppressed,” he said.

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989 is on view until May 24.