Tag Archives: UCLA Film and Television Archive

ALLYSON NADIA FIELD AND MARSHA GORDON

When we began researching SCREENING RACE IN AMERICAN NONTHEATRICAL FILM, we put out a call to archivists for suggestions of lost, hidden or neglected films that deserved scholarly attention.

Stephen Parr of Oddball Films, who passed away in 2017, enthusiastically recommended Nikolai Ursin’s BEHIND EVERY GOOD MAN (circa 1967), a short 16mm portrait of a transgender African American person. Mark Quigley at UCLA made it possible for us to view the film, which had been recently restored. We were moved by its sophisticated engagement with questions of gender, sexuality and race. Noah Tsika of Queens College wrote a thoughtful and deeply informed essay on the film’s representational politics as well as its subject’s self-presentation.

Rediscovering an important film in the archives like BEHIND EVERY GOOD MAN and helping bring more attention to it energized us—it’s one of the reasons we do what we do. — Allyson Nadia Field and Marsha Gordon, editors of Screening Race

Top and below: Nikolai Ursin, Behind Every Good Man (circa 1967) (2), courtesy and © the filmmaker. Above: Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film (2019), edited by Allyson Nadia Field and Marsha Gordon, courtesy and © Duke University Press.

SÁTÁNTANGÓ STREAM

The structure of SÁTÁNTANGÓ came from the novel… [which] we didn’t change. László Krasznahorkai wrote twelve chapters, six forward and six back, which is the structure of the tango. — Béla Tarr

SÁTÁNTANGÓ has a reputation for duration (long) and velocity (slow). Think of it as a suspended thriller playing out over several episodes.

For a limited time, Arbelos Films and the UCLA Film & Television Archive are presenting the opportunity to watch the seven-hour film at your leisure—over a 72-hour period.

Devastating, enthralling for every minute of its seven hours. I’d be glad to see it every year for the rest of my life. — Susan Sontag on SÁTÁNTANGÓ

See link below for details.

UCLA Film & Television Archive presents

SÁTÁNTANGÓ

Béla Tarr, Sántátangó (1994). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker and Arbelos Films.

SUSAN SONTAG — FROM THE ARCHIVE

We felt that this was very exciting. That this film could be something very new. But we couldn’t judge. Because the script didn’t say so much.Agneta Ekmanner, actor in Duet for Cannibals*

On Friday, two UCLA institutions—the Film and Television Archive and the Library Special Collections—will screen the 2K restoration of Susan Sontag’s directorial debut DUET FOR CANNIBALS and present a selection of the Susan Sontag Papers.

DUET FOR CANNIBALS

Friday, February 7, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater—Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*Agneta Ekmanner, author’s interview in Benjamin Moser, Sontag: Her Life and Work (New York: Ecco, 2019), 313.

See “Benjamin Moser’s Pulitzer Prize for Biography is a Travesty,” by Nádia Gotlib, Lisa Paddock, Carl Rollyson, and Magdalena Edwards.

From top: Susan Sontag, photograph by Jill Krementz, 1974; Sontag, Duet for Cannibals (1969) (4). Images courtesy and © Jill Krementz, the filmmakers, actors, producers, stills photographers, and Metrograph Pictures.

SHIRLEY CLARKE — THE COOL WORLD

I know a lot about alienation… I think all women filmmakers are aware of it. It was the subject of a lot of the conversations I had with Maya Deren. We agreed that we were always going to present a united front to the world…

I would not have been able to make THE COOL WORLD had I not been living with Carl Lee at that time. It took Carl three months of going up to Harlem all the time, gathering kids, and bringing them down for us to interview… The “good” kids in school weren’t giving us believable readings… I finally persuaded Carl to try to get to the gangs, [and] it was very exciting because the “real” kids started improvising the script we had written right back to us.Shirley Clarke

As part of the UCLA Film and Television Archive series American Neorealism, Part One—1948–1984, Clarke’s THE COOL WORLD will screen at the Billy Wilder Theater, Hammer Museum this weekend on a double bill with Michael Roemer’s Nothing But a Man.

Frederick Wiseman produced THE COOL WORLD, and the jazz score is by Mal Waldron, with Dizzy Gillespie on the soundtrack.

THE COOL WORLD

Saturday, January 18, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater—Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Shirley Clarke, The Cool World (1964). Film stills and (above) photographs of Clarke on set and with composer Mal Waldron. Images courtesy the filmmaker’s estate, the actors, the producers, and the distributors.

YOUNG SOUL REBELS

London, 1977. A year of nascent punk rock explosion and the rebirth of soul. Pirate DJs and the Queen’s Jubilee. Love on the run and racist skinheads on the prowl. YOUNG SOUL REBELS—an early feature by Isaac Julien—is part-thriller, part-musical, and a groundbreaking exemplar of the New Queer Cinema movement of the 1990s.

Starring Mo Sesay, Valentine Nonyela, Jason Durr, and Sophie Okonedo, the film screens this week in Westwood as part of the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project Screening Series.

YOUNG SOUL REBELS

Friday, August 16, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater, Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard., Los Angeles.

Isaac Julien, Young Soul Rebels (1991). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker.