Tag Archives: UCLA

FOUR QUARTETS — TANOWITZ, MARDEN, SAARIAHO

If I am right to think this is the greatest creation of dance theater so far this century, we’re fortunate that FOUR QUARTETS will travel to other stages. I long to become more deeply acquainted with the many layers of its stage poetry.Alastair Macaulay

In great demand and at the height of her powers, Pam Tanowitz creates work that bridges contemporary dance and ballet. Her FOUR QUARTETS—the most acclaimed dance work of the past two decades—is a collaboration with Brice Marden, who created the set images, and composer Kaija Saariaho.

The title refers to T. S. Eliot’s poetry cycle, which provided the inspiration and text for the work, read in performance by Kathleen Chalfant.

This weekend, CAP UCLA presents two performances of FOUR QUARTETS at Royce Hall. Dancers include Kara Chan, Jason Collins, Dylan Crossman, Christine Flores, Zachary Gonder, Lindsey Jones, Victor Lozano, Maile Okamura, and Melissa Toogood.

The scenic and lighting design is by Clifton Taylor, the costume design by Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung, and the sound design by Jean-Baptiste Barriére. Saariaho’s music will be performed by The Knights.

PAM TANOWITZ, BRICE MARDEN, and KAIJA SAARIAHO—FOUR QUARTETS

Saturday, February 15, at 8 pm.

Sunday, February 16, at 3 pm.

Royce Hall, UCLA

10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles.

Pam Tanowitz, Brice Marden, Kaija Saariaho, Four Quartets, in performance. Photographs by Maria Baranova. Images courtesy and © the artists, the dancers, the photographer, and CAP UCLA.

PASSING THROUGH — LARRY CLARK IN CONVERSATION

Larry Clark and film curator Jheanelle Brown will participate in a post-screening discussion following a UCLA presentation of Clark’s rarely seen L. A. Rebellion classic PASSING THROUGH—”a film that by many accounts has successfully transposed the compositional principles of jazz improvisation into filmmaking and thus reached a powerful synergy between free jazz and film form.”

PASSING THROUGH

Thursday, February 13, at 7:30 pm.

James Bridges Theater—Melnitz Hall—UCLA

235 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles.

Larry Clark, Passing Through (1977), from top: Nathaniel Taylor as Womack (5), and with Pamela Jones as Maya (third from top). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker.

PETER WOLLEN

Whether one was auditing Peter Wollen’s classes at UCLA, reading his essays, or watching the films he wrote and/or directed, one was always persuaded by what Tilda Swinton calls his “dazzling prophetic genius.”

Wollen—director of Friendship’s Death and co-director with Laura Mulvey of Riddles of the Sphinx and Crystal Gazing—was born in London in 1938 and died earlier this month in England. He is survived by his wife, the writer and artist Leslie Dick.

He co-wrote Michelangelo Antonioni’s The Passenger, authored several books—including Signs and Meaning in the Cinema and Paris Manhattan: Writings on Art—and was professor emeritus of film, television and digital media in the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television.

From top: Peter Wollen, photograph by Karen Knorr; Wollen, Paris Manhattan: Writings on Art; Wollen, Paris Hollywood: Writings on Film; Michelangelo Antonioni, The Passenger (1975); Laura Mulvey and Wollen, Riddles of the Sphinx (1977); Wollen, Friendship’s Death (1987), with Tilda Swinton and Bill Paterson; Wollen, photograph by Leslie Dick. Images courtesy and © the filmmakers, the author, the photographers, and Verso books.

MICHAEL KEEGAN-DOLAN’S SWAN LAKE

Matthew Bourne, with his aggressive male swans and nightclub scenes, took Swan Lake in one direction. Michael Keegan-Dolan’s short, Tchaikovsky-free take—LOCH NA HEALA (SWAN LAKE)—goes somewhere else altogether. Inspired by a number of folktales, including “The Children of Lir,” and updated to present-day Ireland, Keegan-Dolan gives us predatory priests, suicidal depressives, and Mikel Murfi as a goat, leading up to an exhilarating, shambolic climax.

This dance-theater-performance art hybrid—performed by Keegan-Dolan’s company, Teaċ Daṁsa, and co-presented by UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance and the Ford Theatres—will be at Royce Hall for one night only. The trio Slow Moving Clouds will perform their score onstage.

LOCH NA HEALA (SWAN LAKE)

Saturday, November 9, at 8 pm.

Royce Hall, UCLA

10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles.

Michael Keegan-Dolan / Teaċ Daṁsa, Loch na hEala (Swan Lake), November 9, 2019, Royce Hall, UCLA, from top: Rachel Poirier (left) and Alex Leonhartsberger (foreground); Michael Murfi, (left) Leonhartsberger (sitting), Erik Nevin, Zen Jefferson and Keir Patrick; Leonhartsberger (left), Patrick, Murfi, Nevin, Jefferson, and Dr. Elizabeth Cameron Dalman; Murfi, Nevin, Dalman, and Patrick; Poirier, Latisha Sparks, Carys Staton, and Anna Kaszuba. Photographs by Reed Hutchinson, images courtesy and © the photographer, the choreographer, the artists, and CAP UCLA.

217 BOXES OF DR. HENRY ANONYMOUS

I am homosexual, I am a psychiatrist. I, like most of you in this room, am a member of the [American Psychiatric Association] and am proud of that membership. However, tonight, I am insofar as it is possible, a we.— Dr. John E. Fryer, aka Dr. Henry Anonymous

So began Dr. Fryer’s 1972 speech at the APA convention in Dallas. Wearing a rubber mask and speaking through a voice-altering device, Fryer anonymously addressed a panel titled Psychiatry: Friend or Foe to the Homosexual? A Dialogue.

(Since 1952, the APA had classified homosexuality as a “sociopathic personality disorder”—a diagnosis, paradoxically, welcomed at the time by many in the gay community, who saw it as a step up from the then prevailing view of queerness as a criminal perversion.)

Dr. Fryer was convinced he needed his disguise to keep medical license, but his courageous speech struck the convention like a bolt of lightening, and the following year the APA removed homosexuality from its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

Writer-director Ain Gordon went through Dr. Fryer’s personal papers to create 217 BOXES OF DR. HENRY ANONYMOUS, onstage this weekend at UCLA’s Freud Playhouse. This conceptual theater piece focuses on three people in Dr. Fryer’s life: his secretary Katherine M. Luder (played by Laura Esterman), his father Ercel Fryer (Ken Marks), and one of his patients, Alfred A. Gross (Derek Lucci)—a fascinating character who, among other things, assisted doctors working with the Selective Service System to weed out potential gay troops leading up to World War II, during which time Gross was accused of “fraternization” with a number of his interlocutors.

217 BOXES OF DR. HENRY ANONYMOUS

Friday, October 11, at 8 pm.

Saturday, October 12, at 3 pm and 8 pm.

Freud Playhouse, UCLA

245 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles.

Ain Gordon, 217 Boxes of Dr. Henry Anonymous, from top: Derek Lucci; Dr. John E. Fryer (right) at the 1972 APA convention in Dallas; Lucci; Laura Esterman(2); Ken Marks, with rear projection of Dr. Fryer. Lucci (top) and Marks photographs by Paula Court. Images courtesy and © the performers, the photographers, and CAP UCLA.