Tag Archives: UCLA

MICHAEL KEEGAN-DOLAN’S SWAN LAKE

Matthew Bourne, with his aggressive male swans and nightclub scenes, took Swan Lake in one direction. Michael Keegan-Dolan’s short, Tchaikovsky-free take—LOCH NA HEALA (SWAN LAKE)—goes somewhere else altogether. Inspired by a number of folktales, including “The Children of Lir,” and updated to present-day Ireland, Keegan-Dolan gives us predatory priests, suicidal depressives, and Mikel Murfi as a goat, leading up to an exhilarating, shambolic climax.

This dance-theater-performance art hybrid—performed by Keegan-Dolan’s company, Teaċ Daṁsa, and co-presented by UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance and the Ford Theatres—will be at Royce Hall for one night only. The trio Slow Moving Clouds will perform their score onstage.

LOCH NA HEALA (SWAN LAKE)

Saturday, November 9, at 8 pm.

Royce Hall, UCLA

10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles.

Michael Keegan-Dolan / Teaċ Daṁsa, Loch na hEala (Swan Lake), November 9, 2019, Royce Hall, UCLA, from top: Rachel Poirier (left) and Alex Leonhartsberger (foreground); Michael Murfi, (left) Leonhartsberger (sitting), Erik Nevin, Zen Jefferson and Keir Patrick; Leonhartsberger (left), Patrick, Murfi, Nevin, Jefferson, and Dr. Elizabeth Cameron Dalman; Murfi, Nevin, Dalman, and Patrick; Poirier, Latisha Sparks, Carys Staton, and Anna Kaszuba. Photographs by Reed Hutchinson, images courtesy and © the photographer, the choreographer, the artists, and CAP UCLA.

217 BOXES OF DR. HENRY ANONYMOUS

I am homosexual, I am a psychiatrist. I, like most of you in this room, am a member of the [American Psychiatric Association] and am proud of that membership. However, tonight, I am insofar as it is possible, a we.— Dr. John E. Fryer, aka Dr. Henry Anonymous

So began Dr. Fryer’s 1972 speech at the APA convention in Dallas. Wearing a rubber mask and speaking through a voice-altering device, Fryer anonymously addressed a panel titled Psychiatry: Friend or Foe to the Homosexual? A Dialogue.

(Since 1952, the APA had classified homosexuality as a “sociopathic personality disorder”—a diagnosis, paradoxically, welcomed at the time by many in the gay community, who saw it as a step up from the then prevailing view of queerness as a criminal perversion.)

Dr. Fryer was convinced he needed his disguise to keep medical license, but his courageous speech struck the convention like a bolt of lightening, and the following year the APA removed homosexuality from its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

Writer-director Ain Gordon went through Dr. Fryer’s personal papers to create 217 BOXES OF DR. HENRY ANONYMOUS, onstage this weekend at UCLA’s Freud Playhouse. This conceptual theater piece focuses on three people in Dr. Fryer’s life: his secretary Katherine M. Luder (played by Laura Esterman), his father Ercel Fryer (Ken Marks), and one of his patients, Alfred A. Gross (Derek Lucci)—a fascinating character who, among other things, assisted doctors working with the Selective Service System to weed out potential gay troops leading up to World War II, during which time Gross was accused of “fraternization” with a number of his interlocutors.

217 BOXES OF DR. HENRY ANONYMOUS

Friday, October 11, at 8 pm.

Saturday, October 12, at 3 pm and 8 pm.

Freud Playhouse, UCLA

245 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles.

Ain Gordon, 217 Boxes of Dr. Henry Anonymous, from top: Derek Lucci; Dr. John E. Fryer (right) at the 1972 APA convention in Dallas; Lucci; Laura Esterman(2); Ken Marks, with rear projection of Dr. Fryer. Lucci (top) and Marks photographs by Paula Court. Images courtesy and © the performers, the photographers, and CAP UCLA.

THE LEHMAN TRILOGY

THE LEHMAN TRILOGYStefano Massini’s acclaimed epic of immigrant commerce, high finance, and spectacular ruin—stars Simon Russell Beale, Adam Godley, and Ben Miles as a cast of dozens across a century and a half of ascendancy while remaining the three Lehman brothers—Henry, Meyer, and Emanuel—who stepped off the boat in 1844, landing in the “magical music box” of America.

The original five-hour version premiered in Paris in 2013, and went on to Milan, where it was first seen by director Sam Mendes. Shortened to a little over three hours, adapted into English by Ben Power, and designed by by Es Devlin, THE LEHMAN TRILOGY is on the West End boards for one more month. Fortunately for local audiences, over the next several months L.A. Theatre Works will present six encores of the National Theatre Live presentation.

THE LEHMAN TRILOGY—NT Live

Saturday, July 27.

Sunday, July 28, August 4, August 25, and September 8.

Saturday, November 23.

All presentations at 3 pm.

James Bridges Theater

Melnitz Hall, UCLA

235 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles.

THE LEHMAN TRILOGY

Through August 31.

Piccadilly Theatre

16 Denman Street, Soho, London.

The Lehman Trilogy, from top: Simon Russell Beale (2); Beale (left), Ben Miles, and Adam Godley; Miles, Beale, and Godley; Godley; Miles, Godley, and Beale; Miles; Beale, Miles, and Godley; Godley, Beale, and Miles. Photographs by Mark Douet. Images courtesy and © the photographer, the performers, the designer, and the National Theatre.

OUTFEST 2019 — BARBARA HAMMER

TENDER FICTIONS—the late, great Barbara Hammer’s follow-up to Nitrate Kisses—traces the filmmaker’s evolution from would-be child-star of the fifties to heterosexual “earth mother” of the sixties to the lesbian artist and activist of her last decades.

As part of The Legacy Project—a partnership between OUTFEST and UCLATENDER FICTIONS (1996) will screen this weekend as part of the festival.

TENDER FICTIONS

Sunday, July 21, at noon.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

See A. L. Steiner on Hammer.

From top: Barbara Hammer, Tender Fictions; Barbara Hammer, On the Road, Big Sur, California, 1975, 2017, gelatin silver print; Barbara Hammer, Sappho Production Meeting, Los Angeles, 1978; Hammer. Images courtesy and © the artist’s estate.

BIXA TRAVESTY

BIXA TRAVESTY is a new documentary that “follows Linn da Quebrada, a black trans woman, performer and activist living in impoverished São Paulo. Her electrifying performances—with plenty of nudity—brazenly take on Brazil’s hetero-normative machismo.”*

The film—a Berlinale favorite directed by Kiko Goifman and Claudia Priscilla—screens this week at UCLA.

BIXA TRAVESTY*

Wednesday, May 1, at 7:30 pm.

James Bridges Theater

Melnitz Hall, UCLA

235 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles.

Linn da Quebrada in Bixa Travesty (2018). Images courtesy of the performer and filmmakers.