Tag Archives: Ursula magazine

DASH SNOW — THE DROWNED WORLD

“Dash [Snow] and David Hammons are both artists with a witch-doctor feel to their work, which is important, because ultimately what is the value of art?… In an increasingly secular society, it’s even more important as people try to form their belief systems. If you’re not going the readymade route, then you look around for the tools available to make something of your own. That’s a big part of the artist’s job or the writer’s job…

“It’s found in the moment, not in an academic way. You find it in the practice. I think the academic and institutional part of the art world is a big problem. Artists often collaborate with them to their detriment, because they think they need the institution as a go-between, a translator for the public. Dash, like Hammons, understood that you don’t need the middleman. Cut out the middleman. Make him wait in line with everyone else. It has to be on the artist’s terms.” — Glenn O’Brien on Dash Snow*

The new exhibition THE DROWNED WORLD presents work from the late artist’s archive, including a selection of rarely seen sculptures.

DASH SNOW—THE DROWNED WORLD

Through May 12.

Participant Inc

253 East Houston Street, New York City.

*”I Don’t Believe in Masterpieces AnywayGlenn O’Brien on Dash Snow,” Ursula 2 (Spring 2019).

See Nicole Miller and David Rimanelli on Snow.

Dash Snow, from top: Mixed-media sculpture, 2000–2009; The Drowned World: Selections from the Dash Snow Archive, 2019, installation view, Participant Inc, New York, photograph by Mark Waldhauser; Untitled, 2000–2009, Polaroid (Kunle Martins (left) and Snow); Untitled (Past, Present), 2006, mixed-media sculpture; Untitled, 2007, collage; Untitled (Her Kisses Were Dangerous), 2006–2007, collage. Images © Dash Snow, courtesy of the Dash Snow Archive, New York City and Participant Inc. Special thanks to Lia Gangitano.

ASPECTS OF GLOBAL PERFORMANCE IN THE 1970S

Columbia University professor Kellie Jones will discuss “the global reaches of performance art during the 1970s through the lens of projects by Latin American and African American artists”—including Adrian Piper, Senga NengudiFelipe Ehrenberg, Lourdes Grobet, and David Lamelas—and considers “the circumstances that allowed performance to be dispersed effortlessly into the flow of everyday life.”*

KELLIE JONES—SIGNS OF LIFE

ASPECTS OF GLOBAL PERFORMANCE IN THE 1970s*

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30 pm.

Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

See “Making Doors: Linda Goode Bryant in conversation with Senga Nengudi,” Ursula 1 (Winter 2018).

Top: David Lamelas, Office of Information about the Vietnam War at Three Levels: The Visual Image, Text and Audio, 1968. Image credit: MoMA.

Above: Felipe Ehrenberg performance.

Below: Lourdes Grobet, Horas y media, 1975. © Lourdes Grobet.