Tag Archives: Venice Biennale

OKWUI ENWEZOR

“We knew it was coming but the finality of his passing makes it even more devastating. Okwui was this enormously prophetic figure, wise beyond his years, whose insights—vision, if you will—literally shaped the universe many of us now inhabit. He was like an enormous tree in the glare, whose shadow provided refuge, hospitality, generosity, and love for so many.” — John Akomfrah

Okwui Enwezor—the great historian, curator, writer, editor, and former artistic director of Haus der Kunst—has died in Munich following four years of cancer treatment.

Enwezor, who was 55 at the time of his death, is celebrated for his paradigm-shifting directorship of Documenta 11 in 2002, and the 56th Venice BiennaleAll the World’s Futures—in 2015.

A writer and editor in demand, Enwezor’s contributions will live on in the work of the artists he championed.

From top: Contemporary African Art Since 1980 (2009), by Okwui Enwezor and Chika Okeke-Agulu, image courtesy Damiani; John Akomfrah: Signs of Empire (2018), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy the New Museum; Candice Breitz: The Scripted Life (2010), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Kunsthaus Bregenz; Recent Histories: Contemporary African Photography and Video Art from the Walther Collection (2017), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Steidl and the Walther Collection; Gary Simmons: Paradise (2012), conversation with Enwezor, image courtesy Damiani; Kerry James Marshall: Painting and Other Stuff (2014), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Ludion; Lyle Ashton Harris: Excessive Exposure (2010), text by Enwezor, image courtesy Gregory R. Miller & Co.; Home Lands–Land Marks: Contemporary Art from South Africa (2009), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Haunch of Venison.

JOAN JONAS — THEY COME TO US WITHOUT A WORD

THEY COME TO US WITHOUT A WORDJoan Jonas’ 2015 Venice Biennale installation—will be on view in California for the first time.

The work incorporates performance, video art, sculpture, and drawing, and will be in San Francisco through mid-March.

In conjunction with the exhibition, Jonas will present two live performances of MOVING OFF THE LAND, “a tribute and poetic response to the power of the ocean.”*

Jonas will also participate in a public conversation with David Gruber, Chrissie Iles, and Markus Reymann at this year’s FOG Design + Art Fair.

JOAN JONAS—

THEY COME TO US WITHOUT A WORD

January 17 through March 10.

Fort Mason Center for Arts and Culture

2 Marina Boulevard, San Francisco.

A CONVERSATION WITH JOAN JONAS

Thursday, January 17, at 3 pm.

Fort Mason Festival Pavilion

2 Marina Boulevard, San Francisco.

JOAN JONAS—

MOVING OFF THE LAND*

Saturday and Sunday, January 19 and 20.

Both shows at 6 pm.

Cowell Theater, Fort Mason

2 Marina Boulevard, San Francisco.

From top: Production images from Joan Jonas, They Come to Us without a Word (2015), (2), images courtesy the artist; Joan Jonas, They Come to Us without a Word II (2015) at the Venice Biennale, performance with Jason Moran at Teatro Piccolo Arsenale, July, 2015, photograph by Moira RicciJonas (right) with Michelle Obama (center) and Malia Obama, June 20, 2015, U.S. Pavilion, Venice Biennale, photograph by Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty ImagesJonas performing Moving Off the Land, Ocean—Sketches and Notes (2018), at Danspace Project, New York, photograph by Ian Douglas, image courtesy of Danspace Project; production images from Joan Jonas, They Come to Us without a Word, image courtesy the artist.

DAWN KASPER — FOUR SCORES (FROM ZERO TO NOTHING)

Last year Dawn Kasper moved into the Central Pavilion at the Venice Biennale for her performance installation The Sun, The Moon, The Stars.

Her new work at David Lewis “returns to the question of cosmology,… addressing topics of human behavior and the creation myth.”*

DAWN KASPER—FOUR SCORES (FROM ZERO TO NOTHING)*

Through January 6.

David Lewis

88 Eldridge Street, Fifth floor, New York City.

From top:

Dawn Kasper—Four Scores (From Zero to Nothing) installation view, 2018.

Dawn Kasper, Cover Up, 2017. Oil paint, acrylic paint, and collage on pigmented ink jet print.

Dawn Kasper, The Stars, 2017-2018. Acrylic on fabric canvas.

Dawn Kasper, Lights 1 (black), 2018. Electrical cords, copper tubing, light bulbs, lighting fixtures, heat shrink plastic, and lighting switch.

Dawn Kasper, Community, 2017. Acrylic paint, iridescent paint, gouache, pencil, Venezia lagoon water on canvas.

All images courtesy the artist and David Lewis gallery.

MARK BRADFORD AND SHARON LOCKHART IN CONVERSATION

At this year’s VENICE BIENNALE, Los Angeles-based artists Sharon Lockhart and Mark Bradford found themselves in the position of “representing” two counties whose federal governments have, to varying degrees, fallen into the hands of nationalist, reactionary forces: the United States in Bradford’s case, Poland in Lockhart’s. (See the recent fate of Pawel Machcewicz, below.*)

This week at the Orpheum Theatre, curator/critic Katy Siegel and the Broad Museum’s Un-Private Collection program welcome Bradford and Lockhart for a conversation about community engagement and their recent work for the biennale.

MARK BRADFORD, SHARON LOCKHART + KATY SIEGEL, Wednesday, August 16, at 7:30 pm.

ORPHEUM THEATRE, 842 South Broadway, downtown Los Angeles.

thebroad.org/programs/un-private-collection-mark-bradford-sharon-lockhart-katy-siegel

2017 ART + FILM GALA HONORING MARK BRADFORD AND GEORGE LUCAS, Saturday, November 4.

LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

lacma.org/sites/default/files/LACMA-2017-Art%2BFilm-Gala-Announcement-8.1.17-final_0.pdf

MARK BRADFORD: TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY, UNITED STATES PAVILION.

SHARON LOCKHART: LITTLE REVIEW, POLISH PAVILION

VENICE BIENNALE, through November 26.

labiennale.org/en

*See, Rachel Donadio, “What Poland Did in the War: Museum Becomes a Cultural and Political Battlefield,” New York Times, November 10, 2016; and Julia Marchalska, “Director of Poland’s Second World War Museum Dismissed,” The Art Newspaper, April 11, 2017:

theartnewspaper.com/news/museums/director-of-poland-s-second-world-war-museum-dismissed/

Top: Mark Bradford, Tomorrow is Another Day installation view, 2017 Venice Biennale.

Bottom: Mark Bradford, Spoiled Foot (prototype for Venice Biennale, photographed at Bradford’s studio in Los Angeles), 2017. Images courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

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ANNE IMHOF — GOLDEN LION

“My work stands for the grace of thoughts, for liberty, for the right to be different, for gender nonconformity, and the pride of being a woman in this world.” — Anne Imhof, representing Germany, after winning the Golden Lion in Venice, 2017

FAUST, by Anne Imhof, took the top prize at the 57th Biennale Arte. Her durational installation/performance piece—Dobermans circling a theater featuring dancers on and under a transparent stage—was a hit among Biennale visitors, too.

“The concept of movement is treacherous. It seems to denote an external, natural movement, whereas in my work is as much about how people project into the future, considering what they might do, how they will do it, why and with whom.” — Anne Imhof*

 

ANNE IMHOF—FAUST 

LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA, 57th INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITION, through November 26, 2017.

THE GERMAN PAVILION

 

labiennale.org/en/Home.html

*Susan Pfeffer, “Anne Imhof,” interview, Kaleidoscope 29 (Spring 2017): 70.

Video, 10 min., FAUST/GERMAN PAVILION:

​the i-D guide to what you need to see at the venice biennale

Faust, Anne Imhof, 57th Biennale Arte, Venice, 2017. Image credit: i-D Vice