Tag Archives: Victoria Miro gallery

CELIA PAUL

[Celia Paul’s] story is striking. It is not, as has been assumed, the tale of a muse who later became a painter, but an account of a painter who, for ten years of her early life, found herself mistaken for a muse, by a man who did that a lot. [Self-Portrait] is about many things besides [Lucian] Freud: her mother, her childhood, her sisters, her paintings. But she neither rejects her past with Freud nor rewrites it, placing present ideas and feelings alongside diary entries and letters she wrote as a young woman, a generous, vulnerable strategy that avoids the usual triumphalism of memoir. For Paul, the self is continuous (“I have always been, and I remain at nearly sixty, the same person I was as a teenager…. This simple realisation seems to me to be complex and profoundly liberating”), and equal weight is given to “the vividness of the past and the measured detachment of the present.” — Zadie Smith, 2019

Landscapes and portraiture—self- and otherwise—are the focus of an exhibition of paintings by Celia Paul, who has just published an extensively illustrated memoir.

CELIA PAUL

Through December 20.

Victoria Miro Gallery II

16 Wharf Road, London.

CELIA PAUL—SELF-PORTRAIT

2019, Jonathan Cape.

Celia Paul, from top: Self-Portrait, Early Summer, 2018, oil on canvas; Self-Portrait, 1983, ink on paper; Kate in White, Spring, 2018 (detail), oil on canvas; Room and Tower, 2019, oil on canvas; 2016 photograph of Paul in her London studio by Gautier Deblonde; My Sisters in Mourning, 2015–16, oil on canvas; Last Light on the Sea, 2016; Celia Paul, Self-Portrait (2019), cover image courtesy and © Jonathan Cape; Lucian and Me, 2019, oil on canvas; Painter and Model, 2012, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, Jonathan Cape, and Victoria Miro.

ISAAC JULIEN — LINA BO BARDI

ISAAC JULIEN: LINA BO BARDI—A MARVELLOUS ENGAGEMENT is the British artist and filmmaker’s nine-screen installation in tribute to the great Brazilian architect.

“Linear time is a western invention; time is not linear, it is a marvellous entanglement, where at any moment points can be chosen and solutions invented without beginning or end.” — Lina Bo Bardi*

ISAAC JULIEN: LINA BO BARDI—A MARVELLOUS ENGAGEMENT*

Through July 27.

Victoria Miro

16 Wharf Road, Hoxton, London

ISAAC JULIEN in conversation with MARIA BALSHAW

Friday, July 5, at 6:30 pm.

Tate Britain

Millbank, London.

Isaac Julien—Lina Bo Bardi: A Marvellous Engagement, Victoria Miro, 2019, installation views. Images courtesy and © the artist and Victoria Miro. Isaac Julien limited edition cover courtesy and © the artist and Wallpaper.

ISAAC JULIEN SYMPOSIUM

At LACMA this weekend, join Charles Gaines, writers and scholars Jennifer González, Shelleen Greene, Ariel Osterweis, B. Ruby Rich, Jeffrey Stewart, and Sarah Thornton, curator Mark Nash, and LACMA‘s Naima J. Keith and Christine Y. Kim for a daylong symposium of screenings and panel discussions celebrating the work of Isaac Julien—who will be in attendance.

Among the complete works to be presented are PLAYTIME, LESSONS OF THE HOUR—FREDERICK DOUGLASS, WESTERN UNION: SMALL BOATS, and a 30th anniversary screening of LOOKING FOR LANGSTON, Julien’s film about Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes.

Excerpts from KAPITAL and TEN THOUSAND WAVES will also be shown.

ISAAC JULIEN SYMPOSIUM

Saturday, May 18, from 9 am to 5 pm.

ISAAC JULIEN—PLAYTIME

Through August 11.

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Full schedule of screenings and speakers:

9:00 am — Coffee and pastries.

9:25 am — Welcome and introductions by Christine Y. Kim, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, LACMA.

9:30 am — PLAYTIME (2014). Sarah Thornton.

9:50 am — KAPITAL (2013), excerpt. Charles Gaines and Mark Nash.

10:50 am — WESTERN UNION: SMALL BOATS (2007). Jennifer González and Shelleen Greene.

12:00 pm — TEN THOUSAND WAVES (2010) (excerpt). Jeffrey Stewart and Ariel Osterweis, with Christine Y. Kim.

1:10 pm to 1:55 pm — Lunch will be provided for participants.

2:00 pm — LOOKING FOR LANGSTON (1989). B. Ruby Rich and Isaac Julien

3:35 pm — LESSONS OF THE HOUR—FREDERICK DOUGLASS (2019). Isaac Julienand Jeffrey Stewart, with Naima J. Keith

Isaac Julien, from top: Emerald City / Capital (Playtime), 2013; Playtime, 2013, LACMA, installation view Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 2013 (2); The Abyss (Playtime), 2013; Playtime, 2013, LACMA, installation view Metro Pictures, 2013, photograph by Genevieve Hanson; All that’s solid melts into air (Playtime), 2013; Ten Thousand Waves, 2010, 35mm film, transferred to HD 9.2 surround sound; Icarus descending (Playtime), 2013; Isaac Julien, Eclipse (Playtime), 2013. Black and white photograph of Isaac Julien, 2017, by Thierry Bal. All works and images courtesy and © Isaac Julien, the photographers, Victoria Miro, London, and Metro Pictures, New York.

STAN DOUGLAS AT THE HAMMER

“Jacques Derrida loved the word observe. He paid special attention to its root word, serve, which tied observation to respect, service, and deference. To observe something, he thought, was an act of humility. You gave yourself over to the details, gathering data and storing it in reserve for the future… *

Stan Douglas uses lens-based media to facilitate this kind of servitude to details. I mention Derrida not to overemphasize the theoretical structures at work in Douglas’ output (and there are many), but rather to point out that the production details Douglas wants viewers to notice in his work are many and fine, and require sustained concentration…. [His work] is an invitation to become curious: about the narratives that have brought Douglas’ subjects to his camera and to the viewer’s gaze; about the processes Douglas uses to make an image look the way it does; and about how his subjects have emerged from seemingly long-lost historical moments and ended up in his pictures.” — Katie Anania

This week, Stan Douglas will give the UCLA Department of Art Lecture at the Hammer.

STAN DOUGLAS talk

Thursday, April 25, at 7:30 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*See Jacques DerridaMemoirs of the Blind: The Self-Portrait and Other Ruins, translated by Pascale-Anne Brault and Michael Naas (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993), 23.

Stan Douglas, from top: Exodus, 1975, 2012, digital C-print mounted on aluminum; Malabar People series, Dancer, 1951, 2011, digital fiber print; The Secret Agent installation view, David Zwirner, New York, 2016, six-channel video installation, eight audio channels with six musical variations, color, sound, 53:35 minutes; Luanda-Kinshasa (2013, still, Jason Moran at left), single-channel video projection, color, sound, 6 hours, 1 minute; Abbott and Cordova, 7 August 1971, 2008, chromogenic print mounted on aluminum; Inconsolable Memories (2005, still), two synchronized asymmetrical film loop projections, 16 mm black-and-white film, sound, fifteen permutations with a common period of 5:39 minutes. Images © Stan Douglas and courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, and Victoria Miro.

ALICE NEEL, UPTOWN

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Last year Hilton Als curated an exhibition of paintings and drawings by Alice Neel for David Zwirner in New York City (the show then traveled to Victoria Miro in London). The catalogue of paintings is accompanied by Hilton’s subjective texts on art, race, gender, Neel, and the city.

“In ALICE NEEL, UPTOWN, Als brings together a body of paintings and works on paper of African-Americans, Latinos, Asians, and other people of color for the first time. Highlighting the innate diversity of Neel’s approach, the selection looks at those whose portraits are often left out of the art-historical canon and how this extraordinary painter captured them…

“A contemporary and personal approach to the artist’s oeuvre, Als’ project is ‘an attempt to honor not only what Neel saw, but the generosity of her seeing.’ ”*

 

HILTON ALSALICE NEEL, UPTOWN,  forward by Jeremy Lewison (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2017). Available now.

davidzwirnerbooks.com/alice-neel-uptown

From top: Alice Neel, Georgie Arce, 1955. Alice Neel, Uptown layout (Alice Neel, Call Me Joe, 1955). Alice Neel, Mercedes Arroyo, 1952 (detail). Images courtesy of David Zwirner.

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