Tag Archives: Village Voice

GARY INDIANA IN LOS ANGELES

“In 1985, the Village Voice offered me a job as senior art critic. This made my life easier and lousy at the same time. I now had to actually enter all those galleries instead of peeking in the windows.” — Gary IndianaVile Days

Indiana’s art reviews for the Voice—collected and republished as Vile Days: The Village Voice Art Columns, 1985–1988—combine “his novelistic and theatrical gifts with a startling political acumen to assess art and the unruly environments that give it context.”

Indiana will give this week’s graduate art lecture at ArtCenter’s Hillside Campus.

In mid-January he will read from Vile Days and present the Michael Haneke film Happy End (2017) at a Hard to Read event in West Hollywood.

 

GARY INDIANA ON VILE DAYS

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30 pm.

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

 

GARY INDIANA AT HARD TO READ

Tuesday, January 15, at 7 pm.

Standard Hotel

8300 Sunset Boulevard, West Hollywood.

 

See ArtCenter Talks: Graduate Seminar, The First Decade 1986–1995, Stan Douglas, ed. (New York: David Zwirner Books/Pasadena, CA: ArtCenter Graduate Press, 2016).

Image credit above: Semiotext(e).

Below: Gary Indiana. Photograph by Hedi El Kholti, courtesy El Kholti and Indiana.

JILL JOHNSTON DANCING

In 1963 and 1964, Andy Warhol captured dancer-choreographers Lucinda Childs, Yvonne Rainer, and Freddy Herko, and Village Voice dance critic Jill Johnston with his Bolex—performing in lofts, on rooftops, and at Judson.

These cinematic time capsules will be screened this weekend and next at the Whitney, and in early December at MOMA.

The films include Jill Johnston Dancing, Freddy Herko, Jill and Freddy Dancing, Lucinda Childs, and Shoulder.

 

DO IT YOURSELF—WARHOL AS BALLETOMANE

Saturday, November 17, at 7 pm.

Friday, November 23, at 2 pm.

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

Through March 31.

Whitney Museum of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

 

ANDY WARHOL AT JUDSON

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30.

Saturday, December 8, at 4:30 pm.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER—THE WORK IS NEVER DONE

Through February 3.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Above: Andy WarholJill Johnston Dancing, 1964.

Below: Andy Warhol, Jill and Freddy Dancing, 1963.

Image credit: © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved.

CRITICAL METHOD

Chris Kraus, interview, Sleek 53 (Spring 2017): 57.

“I was writing a column for an art magazine, Artfest, in the late ’90s and early 2000s. I had just moved to L.A. and I really didn’t know that much about art. I still don’t—actually I have a very limited knowledge of great art—but I had to come up with a column every three months! So what I did was I ended up writing about all the conditions around me, combining a description of the arts with everything else that I was doing and seeing and thinking and feeling. It was about discovering L.A. and a lot of it was about living alone for the first time. But I copied that from Gary Indiana, he did something similar in the Village Voice in the 1980s—he copied it from Jill Johnston, who did that in the late ’50s and the early ’70s. And I think if we go back into history and art criticism, we can talk about Proust doing that and the damn radical depiction of visual art that’s contained within some of the books in In Search of Lost Time. I mean there’s a great tradition of writers embracing and describing and understanding and interpreting visual art, and it doesn’t have to come from a purely technocratic and theoretical place….

“It’s not that I can only think about my own little life, but when I think about larger things, I like to think about larger things in simpler and more human ways….”

sleek-mag.com/2017/05/05/chris-kraus-interview-i-love-dick/

Chris Kraus.

chriskraus