Tag Archives: Vito Acconci

INGA LĀCE AT LAXART

Inga Lāce—a curator from Riga whose practice connects the art/historical with the social/political—will give a talk at LAXART this week and present AMERICA IS NOT READY FOR THIS, the artist Karol Radziszewski’s 2012 film that takes as its starting point the 1977 trip Natalia LL made to New York City.

“Radziszewski revives Natalia LL’s memories, confronting both Polish and Western narratives of art history and raising a series of questions on issues such as gender, feminist art, conceptual art, and queer and East-West relations and their impact on the art world in the context of the period of the Iron Curtain.

“The film is both a search for parallels between the artistic experiences of Natalia LL and Radziszewski, as well as an attempt to examine the rules governing the positioning of artists in the art world, both in the 1970s and today.”*

Included in the film are interviews with Carolee SchneemannVito Acconci, AA Bronson, Douglas Crimp, Antonio Homem, and Mario Montez.

CURATORIAL TALK AND FILM SCREENING WITH INGA LĀCE*

Wednesday, November 7, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

LAXART

7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood.

Top: Inga Lāce. Image credit: LAXART.

Above: Karol Radziszewski, America is Not Ready for This material.

Below: Karol Radziszewski, Karol and Natalia LL, 2011. Image credit: Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw.

ACCONCI — TUAZON — VIOLETTE

An exhibition at Migros revisiting works by Oscar Tuazon and Banks Violette will be up for two more weeks.

In addition to sculptures by the two artists, the show includes Tuazon’s two-track sound piece My Flesh to Your Bare Bones (2010), a dialog with Vito Acconci:

“Acconci drew up the text Antarctica of the Mind (2004) as a kind of utopian blueprint for the British research station Halley II in Antarctica; his proposal was never realized. The recording guides the listener in imagining a virtual place unconnected to any points of reference: ‘So think of this world as a white sheet of paper, a blank page,’ Acconci’s voice instructs the visitor before furnishing his virtual world with balloonlike structures made of light. Tuazon responds to the audio recording by combining it with his own voice in a simultaneous confrontation. Spoken in the perspective of a first-person narrator, his sentences transport the body to Acconci’s immaterial and featureless landscape and compete with it in a subjective and almost vulnerable manner.”*

 

COLLECTION ON DISPLAY—

OSCAR TUAZON, BANKS VIOLETTE*

Through May 13.

Migros Museum

Limmatstrasse 270, Zürich.

Above: Vito Acconci and Oscar Tuazon, My Flesh to Your Bare Bones, 2010. Two-channel audio installation, 9:46 min.

Below: Oscar Tuazon, I use my body for something, I use it to make something, I make something with my body, whatever that is. I make something and I pay for it and I get paid for it., 2010 (detail). Concrete, rebar, mesh. Collection Migros Museum.

Photographs © Stefan Altenburger.

MODERN SCULPTURE READER

The unofficial mascot for the fifth decennial Skulptur Projekte Münster—through October 1, 2017—is a cartoon of a man holding a drink and a cigarette exclaiming, “This shit rocks!” In the year of the previous exhibition, the Henry Moore Institute and its curator Penelope Curtis initiated and published the MODERN SCULPTURE READER (2007)—which quickly sold out and fell out of print.

Five years later, the J. Paul Getty Museum sponsored a second edition of this essential volume on twentieth-century sculpture, which includes:

Essays by Eva Hesse (“Contingency”), Apollinaire (“Duchamp–Villon”), Vito Acconci (“Notes on Vienna”), and Benjamin H. D. Buchloh (“Michael Asher and the Conclusion of Modern Sculpture”). Interviews with Louise Bourgeois, Robert Smithson, Rachel Whiteread, Bruce Nauman, and Richard Serra. Excerpts from longer pieces—Robert Irwin’s “Notes Toward Conditional Art,” Rilke on Rodin, Wilhelm Worringer on abstraction, Carl Einstein on African sculpture, and Allan Kaprow on assemblages and happenings.

The 70 texts—artists’ statements, newspaper and magazine articles, poems, transcribed lectures and interviews—are arranged chronologically, and edited by Jon Wood, David Hulks, and Alex Potts.

MODERN SCULPTURE READER (Leeds: Henry Moore Institute/Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2007 and 2012).

Claes OldenburgGiant Pool Balls—which was made for the first Skulptur Projekte Münster in 1977—covered with graffiti. Image credit: Rudolf Wakonigg/LWL, 1977/©1987 Skulptur Projekte Münster.

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KK_1977_Oldenburg_Wakonigg

THE LARRY CLARK COLLECTION

“Symbols are more meaningful than things themselves.”—  Jenny Holzer, from Truisms, in LARRY CLARK—WHITE TRASH

Larry Clark is one of the great New York collectors, and the walls of his Tribeca loft present an ever-changing gallery of the art he has bought, traded, been given by friends, or created himself over the last half century.

LARRY CLARK—WHITE TRASH, at Luring Augustine Bushwick, is an exhibition of artworks from Clark’s personal collection. In addition to the work below, participating artists include: Vito Acconci, Richard Artschwager, Donald Baechler, Max Blagg, Lisa Bowman, Chris Burden, Jeff Elrod, Leo Fitzpatrick, Robert Frank, Paul Gauguin, Robert Gober, Mark Gonzales, Martin Kippenberger, Sherrie Levine, Paul McCarthy, Bjarne Melgaard, Scott Myles, Méret Oppenheim, Jack Pierson, Jason Polan, Sigmar Polke, Christy Rupp, Philip Taaffe, Koichiro Takagi, Sally Webster, Sue Williams, Franz West, Brian Weil, David Wojnarowicz, and Christopher Wool.

LARRY CLARKWHITE TRASH, through June 18.

LUHRING AUGUSTINE BUSHWICK, 25 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brooklyn.

luhringaugustine.com/exhibitions/larry-clark9

 

i-d.vice.com/en_au/article/larry-clark-on-his-astoundingly-eccentric-personal-art-collection

 

Image credits (top to bottom): Joe Andoe, Spaniard in the Works, 2012, oil on canvas; Wade Guyton, Untitled, 2008, Xerox print; Mike Kelley, Blood and Soil (Potato Print), 1989, silkscreen in colors on a silk banner; Richard Prince, Untitled (Joke), 2013, ink jet on canvas; Wallace Berman, Untitled, 1967, verifax collage; Helmut Newton, Larry Clark, Cannes, 1995, photograph; Raymond Pettibon, No Title (They Ought To…), 1985, pen and ink on paper.

Larry Clark’s White Trash

Larry Clark’s White Trash

Marfa Girl: il regista del film Larry Clark fotografato da Helmut Newton

CHRIS BURDEN DOCUMENTARY

“Joe the Lion”—David Bowie’s song about Chris Burden—is a tribute to the seminal performance artist’s early days, when his body was a laboratory and canvas for bullets, nails, starvation, and potential electrocution. As a student at UC Irvine, Burden didn’t wait around for the bullies; he stuffed himself into a locker. Hitting his heyday during the rise of video art, his pieces have been well-documented, and today his Urban Light sculpture is the number one selfie spot in Los Angeles.

Join Richard Dewey and Timothy Marrinan at the LACMA screening of their 2016 documentary BURDEN, followed by a conversation with the directors.

BURDEN features interviews with Marina Abramovic, Ed Moses, Alexis Smith, Larry Bell, Billy Al Benston, Robert Irwin, Barbara Smith, Peter Schjeldahl, Jonathan Gold, Ed Ruscha, Paul Schimmel, Frank Gehry, Christopher Knight, and the late Vito Acconci.

BURDEN, Thursday, May 4, at 7:30 pm.

BING THEATER, LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

eventbrite.com/e/free-screening-burden-tickets-33719463824

Chris Burden, post-performance Image credit: Lewright

Chris Burden, post-performance
Image credit: Lewright