Tag Archives: Vito Acconci

MASKULINITÄTEN

What does a feminist exhibition on masculinity look like? This was the question asked by curators Eva Birkenstock, Michelle Cotton, and Nikola Dietrich while organizing MASKULINITÄTEN, their three-part exhibition now open in Bonn, Cologne, and Düsseldorf.

The Bonn section—curated by Cotton, head of Artistic Programmes and Content at Mudam, Luxembourg—includes work by Lynda Benglis, Judith Bernstein, Alexandra Bircken, Patricia L. Boyd, Jana Euler, Hal FischerEunice Golden, Richard Hawkins, Jenny Holzer, Hudinilson Jr., Allison Katz, Mahmoud Khaled, Hilary Lloyd, Sarah Lucas, Robert Morris, D’Ette Nogle, Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), Bea Schlingelhoff, and Anita Steckel.

The Cologne section—curated by Dietrich, director of the Kölnischer Kunstverein—includes Georgia Anderson & David Doherty & Morag Keil & Henry Stringer, Louis Backhouse, Olga Balema, Gerry Bibby, Juliette Blightman, Anders Clausen, Enrico David, Jonathas de Andrade, Jimmy DeSana, Hedi El Kholti, Hilary Lloyd, Shahryar Nashat, Carol Rama, Bea Schlingelhoff, Heji Shin, Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Carrie Mae Weems, Marianne Wex, Martin Wong, and Katharina Wulff.

The presentation in Düsseldorf—curated by Birkenstock, director of the Kunstverein for the Rheinland and Westfalen, Düsseldorf—features the work of Vito Acconci, The Agency, Keren Cytter, Vaginal Davis, Nicole Eisenman, Andrea Fraser, keyon gaskin with Samiya Bashir, sidony o’neal & Adee Roberson, Philipp GuflerAnnette Kennerley, Sister Corita Kent, Jürgen Klauke, Jutta Koether, Tetsumi Kudo, Klara LidénHenrik Olesen, D.A. Pennebaker & Chris Hegedus, Josephine Pryde, Lorenzo Sandoval, Julia Scher, Agnes Scherer, Bea Schlingelhoff, Katharina Sieverding, Nancy Spero, and Evelyn Taocheng Wang.

MASKULINITÄTEN will be accompanied by a catalogue published by Koenig Books, with contributions by—among others—CAConrad, Nelly Gawellek, Chris Kraus, Quinn Latimer, Kerstin Stakemeier, Marlene Streeruwitz, and Änne Söll.

MASKULINITÄTEN

Through November 24.

Bonner Kunstverein

Hochstadenring 22, Bonn.

Kölnischer Kunstverein

Hahnenstrasse 6, Cologne.

Kunstverein Düsseldorf

Grabbeplatz 4, Düsseldorf.

Maskulinitäten, a co-operation of the Bonner Kunstverein, Kölnischem Kunstverein, and Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf, September 1–November 24, 2019. Cologne installation photographs by Mareike Tocha, except second from top and fourth from bottom, by Katja Illner. Images courtesy and © the artists, the institutions, and the photographers.

OSCAR TUAZON — COLLABORATOR

Oscar Tuazon‘s sculptural works made in collaboration with artists and writers Ariana Reines, Matias Faldbakken, Elias Hansen, and Vito Acconci are now on view at the Bellevue Arts Museum—Tuazon’s first solo museum show in his native Washington State.

The exhibition—COLLABORATOR—also includes work in honor of Leonard Peltier, and “new sculptures and site-responsive interventions that respond, in part, to the porous, light-filled nature of architect Steven Holl‘s design” for the museum’s third floor galleries.*

OSCAR TUAZON—COLLABORATOR*

Through September 15.

Bellevue Arts Museum

510 Bellevue Way NE, Bellevue.

See PARIS LA 13—”CHEZ CHEZ PERV PERV” (Spring 2015), an issue guest-edited by Gardar Eide EinarssonMatias Faldbakken, and Oscar Tuazon.

Oscar Tuazon—Collaborator, 2019, installation views, Bellevue Arts Museum. Photographs by Dorothée Perret. Images courtesy and © the artists and the Bellevue Arts Museum.

INGA LĀCE AT LAXART

Inga Lāce—a curator from Riga whose practice connects the art/historical with the social/political—will give a talk at LAXART this week and present AMERICA IS NOT READY FOR THIS, the artist Karol Radziszewski’s 2012 film that takes as its starting point the 1977 trip Natalia LL made to New York City.

“Radziszewski revives Natalia LL’s memories, confronting both Polish and Western narratives of art history and raising a series of questions on issues such as gender, feminist art, conceptual art, and queer and East-West relations and their impact on the art world in the context of the period of the Iron Curtain.

“The film is both a search for parallels between the artistic experiences of Natalia LL and Radziszewski, as well as an attempt to examine the rules governing the positioning of artists in the art world, both in the 1970s and today.”*

Included in the film are interviews with Carolee SchneemannVito Acconci, AA Bronson, Douglas Crimp, Antonio Homem, and Mario Montez.

CURATORIAL TALK AND FILM SCREENING WITH INGA LĀCE*

Wednesday, November 7, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

LAXART

7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood.

Top: Inga Lāce. Image credit: LAXART.

Above: Karol Radziszewski, America is Not Ready for This material.

Below: Karol Radziszewski, Karol and Natalia LL, 2011. Image credit: Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw.

ACCONCI — TUAZON — VIOLETTE

An exhibition at Migros revisiting works by Oscar Tuazon and Banks Violette will be up for two more weeks.

In addition to sculptures by the two artists, the show includes Tuazon’s two-track sound piece My Flesh to Your Bare Bones (2010), a dialog with Vito Acconci:

“Acconci drew up the text Antarctica of the Mind (2004) as a kind of utopian blueprint for the British research station Halley II in Antarctica; his proposal was never realized. The recording guides the listener in imagining a virtual place unconnected to any points of reference: ‘So think of this world as a white sheet of paper, a blank page,’ Acconci’s voice instructs the visitor before furnishing his virtual world with balloonlike structures made of light. Tuazon responds to the audio recording by combining it with his own voice in a simultaneous confrontation. Spoken in the perspective of a first-person narrator, his sentences transport the body to Acconci’s immaterial and featureless landscape and compete with it in a subjective and almost vulnerable manner.”*

 

COLLECTION ON DISPLAY—

OSCAR TUAZON, BANKS VIOLETTE*

Through May 13.

Migros Museum

Limmatstrasse 270, Zürich.

Above: Vito Acconci and Oscar Tuazon, My Flesh to Your Bare Bones, 2010. Two-channel audio installation, 9:46 min.

Below: Oscar Tuazon, I use my body for something, I use it to make something, I make something with my body, whatever that is. I make something and I pay for it and I get paid for it., 2010 (detail). Concrete, rebar, mesh. Collection Migros Museum.

Photographs © Stefan Altenburger.

MODERN SCULPTURE READER

The unofficial mascot for the fifth decennial Skulptur Projekte Münster—through October 1, 2017—is a cartoon of a man holding a drink and a cigarette exclaiming, “This shit rocks!” In the year of the previous exhibition, the Henry Moore Institute and its curator Penelope Curtis initiated and published the MODERN SCULPTURE READER (2007)—which quickly sold out and fell out of print.

Five years later, the J. Paul Getty Museum sponsored a second edition of this essential volume on twentieth-century sculpture, which includes:

Essays by Eva Hesse (“Contingency”), Apollinaire (“Duchamp–Villon”), Vito Acconci (“Notes on Vienna”), and Benjamin H. D. Buchloh (“Michael Asher and the Conclusion of Modern Sculpture”). Interviews with Louise Bourgeois, Robert Smithson, Rachel Whiteread, Bruce Nauman, and Richard Serra. Excerpts from longer pieces—Robert Irwin’s “Notes Toward Conditional Art,” Rilke on Rodin, Wilhelm Worringer on abstraction, Carl Einstein on African sculpture, and Allan Kaprow on assemblages and happenings.

The 70 texts—artists’ statements, newspaper and magazine articles, poems, transcribed lectures and interviews—are arranged chronologically, and edited by Jon Wood, David Hulks, and Alex Potts.

MODERN SCULPTURE READER (Leeds: Henry Moore Institute/Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2007 and 2012).

Claes OldenburgGiant Pool Balls—which was made for the first Skulptur Projekte Münster in 1977—covered with graffiti. Image credit: Rudolf Wakonigg/LWL, 1977/©1987 Skulptur Projekte Münster.

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