Tag Archives: Whitney Museum of American Art

MICHAEL RAKOWITZ

Artist and professor Michael Rakowitz—whose work focuses on “singular subjects as literal and symbolic embodiments of the history of Iraq, its diaspora, and the broader Middle East”—recently seceded from the Whitney Biennial in light of the museum’s decision to appoint and defend a tear gas manufacturer as its vice chairman.

Redcat presents Rakowitz’s first Los Angeles exhibition—DISPUTE BETWEEN THE TAMARISK AND THE DATE PALM—in their gallery.

MICHAEL RAKOWITZ—DISPUTE BETWEEN THE TAMARISK AND THE DATE PALM

Through June 2.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Michael RakowitzReturn, 2004-ongoing, mixed media installation view, Michael Rakowitz: Backstroke of the WestMCA Chicago, 2017–18, photograph by Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago; Michael Rakowitz, Minaret, performance, 2001–ongoing, mosque alarm clock, megaphone, image courtesy the artist.

PULLING OUT OF THE WHITNEY

In protest against the Whitney’s refusal to disassociate from Warren B. Kanders—the vice chairman of the museum’s board and the owner of Safariland, a manufacturer of tear gas cannisters and smoke grenades that were used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border this past November—W.A.G.E. is urging artists to withdraw their work from the 2019 Whitney Biennial.

See Working Artists and the Greater Economy and Decolonize This Place.

From top: Safariland tear gas found at the border and Whitney director Adam Weinberg, 2018, poster; Decolonize this Place, W.A.G.E. and Chinatown Art Brigade protest invitation, 2019. Images courtesy Decolonize this Place, W.A.G.E. and Chinatown Art Brigade.

JILL JOHNSTON DANCING

In 1963 and 1964, Andy Warhol captured dancer-choreographers Lucinda Childs, Yvonne Rainer, and Freddy Herko, and Village Voice dance critic Jill Johnston with his Bolex—performing in lofts, on rooftops, and at Judson.

These cinematic time capsules will be screened this weekend and next at the Whitney, and in early December at MOMA.

The films include Jill Johnston Dancing, Freddy Herko, Jill and Freddy Dancing, Lucinda Childs, and Shoulder.

 

DO IT YOURSELF—WARHOL AS BALLETOMANE

Saturday, November 17, at 7 pm.

Friday, November 23, at 2 pm.

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

Through March 31.

Whitney Museum of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

 

ANDY WARHOL AT JUDSON

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30.

Saturday, December 8, at 4:30 pm.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER—THE WORK IS NEVER DONE

Through February 3.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Above: Andy WarholJill Johnston Dancing, 1964.

Below: Andy Warhol, Jill and Freddy Dancing, 1963.

Image credit: © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved.

IRVING BLUM IN CONVERSATION

“Warhol didn’t make a mark on American culture. He became the instrument with which American culture designated itself.” — Peter Schjeldahl

In conjunction with the Whitney show ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN, Irving Blum—whose Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles was the first to exhibit Warhol’s post-advertising artwork, the Campbell’s soup-can paintings—will talk about working with the artist.

Blum will be joined by Bob ColacelloInterview editor throughout the 1970s—and Vincent Fremont, the former executive manager of Warhol’s studio and a co-founder of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Exhibition curator Donna De Salvo will moderate the conversation.

MY LIFE WITH WARHOL

Friday, November 16, at 6:30 pm.

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

Through March 31.

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

From top:

Andy Warhol, Irving Blum, Polaroid.

Andy Warhol, from the Campbell’s Soup Can series, 1962. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol’s Exposures (1979), edited by Bob Colacello.

Warhol (left) and Irving Blum.

KARA WALKER IN CONVERSATION

Join Kara Walker and Whitney director Adam D. Weinberg for a discussion of how art can address the ongoing legacy of slavery in contemporary American life.

 

KARA WALKER

Thursday, November 1, at 7 pm.

Hess Theater, Whitney Museum of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

Above: Kara Walker, My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love, exhibition catalogue. Image credit: Walker Art Center, 2007.

Below: Kara WalkerExodus of Confederates From Atlanta, 2005, from the portfolio Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated), photolithograph and screenprint.

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City. © 2005 Kara Walker.