Tag Archives: Yves Saint Laurent

KARL LAGERFELD

“I was once a professor at the College of Applied Art in Vienna. In the short period in which I lectured, I realized that I had absolutely no educational fiber whatsoever, that I wasn’t interested in my students. Without being egotistical, what I do is make things. Explaining it to others is not my thing at all. I’m a battlefield person. And generals don’t necessarily make a good minister of war.” — Karl Lagerfeld

“It is with deep sadness that the House of Chanel announces the passing of Karl Lagerfeld, the Creative Director for the Chanel Fashion House since 1983. Virginie Viard, director of Chanel’s fashion creation studio and Lagerfeld’s closest collaborator for more than thirty years, has been entrusted by Alain Wertheimer with the creative work for the collections, so that the legacy of Gabrielle Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld can live on.” — Chanel, February 19, 2019

“I love frivolousness. I know a lot of people who would have disappeared long ago had they not been frivolous… I hate it when the gentlemen with their taffeta and scissors take themselves too seriously. I love everything that is transcient. You should never anchor yourself in an epoch. The tale of Romeo and Juliet lasted only one night, and now it’s the symbol of eternal love.” — Karl Lagerfeld

The fashion designer, creative director, photographer, artist, publisher, bibliophile, actor, author, costumer, and aphorist was a cherished contributor to PARIS LA, supporting Chanel’s campaign collaborations over the last ten years, and creating a poster for Issue 5.

“I have no conception of my valuable time. For me, wasting time is the ultimate luxury. For example, if I’m lying on the couch and reading an interesting book when I should be doing something else, maybe that’s wasting time. But the stimulation of a guilty conscience is extremely creative. It’s the spice of life.” — Karl Lagerfeld

Lagerfeld quotes from Deutsch Vogue Dialogues, “Camouflage, Camouflage: Voyeur Karl Lagerfeld in conversation with his friend Gabriele Henkel, an expert on the stage management of life” (originally published in Deutsch Vogue in 1992), edited by Condé Nast Germany (Munich: Prestel Verlag, 2004), 110–114.

From top: Karl Lagerfeld in Paris, Grand Palais, July 2018; young Lagerfeld in Paris; Lagerfeld with Donna Jordan (left) and Jane Forth in L’Amour (1973), directed by Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey; Lagerfeld in the 1970s; Lagerfeld with Jacques de Bascher, 1970s, photograph © Philippe Heurtault; Yves Saint Laurent and Lagerfeld at the Palace, 1970s; Karl Lagerfeld, photograph from Metamorphoses of an American (Göttingen: Steidl, 2008), his tribute to model Brad Kroenig; Karl Lagerfeld, posters (front and verso) for PARIS LA 5 (Winter 2010–2011); Lagerfeld with Paloma Picasso at Studio 54, photograph by Richard P. Manning.

JEROME ROBBINS AND NEW YORK

“My beautiful city is set on rock between two flowing paths of water that run to the sea. My city is tall and jagged—with gold-slated towers… My city chokes on its breath, and sparkles with its false lights—and sleeps restlessly at night. My city is a lone man walking at night down an empty street watching his shadow grow longer as he passes the last lamp post, seeing no comfort in the blank, dark windows, and hearing his footsteps echo against the building and fade away.” — Jerome Robbins

Admired, disparaged, beloved, feared, Jerome Robbins (1918–1998) was one of the great choreographers of the twentieth century. Arthur Laurents told Robbins he was “a shit” for naming names as a “friendly witness” for HUAC. (Robbins feared being exposed as bisexual.) Yet Laurents continued to collaborate with him, most notably on West Side Story. (Stephen Sondheim, the show’s lyricist, said that Robbins was one of the only geniuses he’d ever worked with.)

Through his work with the American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet, and on Broadway—On the Town, Gypsy, and Fiddler on the Roof, to name just three shows among dozens—Robbins was indelibly associated with his home base and muse: Manhattan.

A new exhibition curated by Julia Foulkes marks Robbins’ centenary and his lifelong celebration of the city, and includes dance films and videos, diaries, paintings, story scenarios, press clippings, and extensive photographic documentation.

VOICE OF MY CITY—JEROME ROBBINS AND NEW YORK

Through March 30.

New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York City.

From top: Sharks and Jets dance in West Side Story, on tour in Europe in the early 2000s; the original Fancy Free cast—Muriel Bentley, Janet Reed, Harold Lang, John Kriza, and Jerome Robbins—in Times Square in 1958, with photographer Gordon Parks leaning over his tripod, courtesy the Jerome Robbins Dance Division/The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Mikhail Baryshnikov in the New York City Ballet production of The Four Seasons (1979), choreographed by Robbins; Antoinette Sibley rehearses Afternoon of a Faun with the choreographer, photograph by Michael Childers, courtesy Dance Magazine; Damian Woetzel and Tiler Peck dance Robbins at Kennedy Center, 2017; Carmen de Lavallade, Robbins, and Yves Saint Laurent—photograph by Whiteside—and Robbins in 1944, both courtesy Dance Magazine.

DENEUVE’S SAINT LAURENT

They met in 1966 on the set of Belle de Jour—each making indelible contributions to Luis Buñuel’s masterpiece—and the following year she was the first to wear the designer’s “le smoking” tuxedo.

In the decades that followed, the relationship between Catherine Deneuve and Yves Saint Laurent bridged friendship, creative expression, and commerce—she was his greatest ambassador.

For Thursday’s live auction at Christie’s, the star has emptied her Normandy closets of over 120 YSL couture pieces. (An online auction the day before will focus on prêt-à-porter.)

CATHERINE DENEUVE

YVES SAINT LAURENT—DE MODE ET AMITIÉ

Thursday, January 24, at 2:30 pm.

Christie’s

9 avenue Matignon, 8th, Paris.

From top: Yves Saint Laurent and Catherine Deneuve, 1968; Helmut Newton (foreground) photographing Yves Saint Laurent and Catherine Deneuve in 1981, photograph by Bruno Bachelet/Paris Match via Getty Images, image credit Christie’s; from right, Zizi Jeanmaire, Deneuve, Françoise HardyElsa Martinelli, and Hélène Rochas at Saint Laurent, 1967, image credit Getty Images; Deneuve at Saint Laurent, photography credit Botti/Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images.

OLIVIER MEYROU’S CÉLÉBRATION

Documentarian Olivier Meyrou was imbedded within the house of Yves Saint Laurent from 1998 to 2001, the designer’s last years at the maison he founded with Pierre Bergé. Unsurprisingly, neither of the principals was in top form during these years of final decline, and—displeased with the results—Bergé suppressed the commercial release of the footage.

Since his death all legal barriers have been cleared, and the paradoxically titled CÉLÉBRATION opened this week in Paris.

CÉLÉBRATION

Through November 20.

MK2 Beaubourg

50 rue Rambuteau, 3rd, Paris.

MK2 Parnasse

11 rue Jules Chaplain, 6th, Paris.

Q & A’s with Olivier Meyrou at Beaubourg on November 15 and 20.

Stills from Célébration. Image credit: Hold Up Films.

ANTONIO LOPEZ

“Antonio didn’t record—he rendered.” — Joan Juliet Buck

ANTONIO LOPEZ 1970—SEX, FASHION & DISCO—an exquisite time capsule directed by James Crump—takes viewers back to the would-be golden age of the early 1970s for an exploration into the lives of artist Antonio Lopez (1943-1987) and his personal and creative partner Juan Ramos (1942-1995) as they navigated the art and fashion worlds of Manhattan and Paris.

With the flashy exuberance that characterized Antonio’s life as well as his drawings, the documentary features extensive on-screen interviews with Antonio discoveries Pat Cleveland, Donna Jordan, Jane Forth, Patti D’Arbanville, Jessica Lange, and Corey Tippin.

Editors Grace CoddingtonJoan Juliet Buck, and Bob Colacello explain Antonio’s various entanglements within the distinct yet overlapping Yves Saint Laurent and Karl Lagerfeld “families,” and the late photographer and Lopez-Ramos confidante Bill Cunningham walks away with the film, giving the last word on Lagerfeld’s final betrayal and Oscar de la Renta’s heroism.*

ANTONIO LOPEZ 1970—SEX, FASHION & DISCO

Through Thursday, October 4.

Laemmle Royal, 11523 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

 

Through Thursday, September 27.

Laemmle Playhouse, 673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

 

Post-screening Q & A with director James Crump, Corey Tippin and artist and Lopez estate-director Paul Caranicas

Friday, September 21, at 7:30 pm.

Laemmle Royal

theantoniolopezbook.com

bookdepository.com/Antonio-Lopez-Instamatics

* See Alicia Drake, The Beautiful Fall: Fashion, Genius, and Glorious Excess in 1970s Paris for an in-depth look at the Antonio LopezJuan RamosKarl Lagerfeld saga.

From top:

Antonio Lopez in Paris, 1970. Photograph by Bill Cunningham.

Corey Tippin, Donna Jordan, Jane Forth, and Jay Johnson in Paris, 1971.

Lopez in the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1971. Photograph by Juan Ramos.

Cunningham and Lopez. Photograph by Ramos.

Jessica Lange. Photographs by Lopez.

Lopez, Tippin, and Jordan.

Image credits: The Estate of Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos, and Film Movement.